Flexicrew makes your recruiting a Slam Dunk!

Yes…March Madness has arrived with excitement and upsets.

 

 

POP QUIZ: How does March Madness Parallel Flexicrew’s mission?Basketball Cleanup Desk Set

 

We started kicking around that March Madness – filling out brackets and picking winners – parallels what we do at Flexicrew to build your workforce every day.

 

For March Madness, fans look at a wide number of teams, review their records and decide among them which they will advance in their brackets to the Sweet Sixteen. Likewise, Flexicrew reviews the resumes of possible candidates, screens them against several criteria, and decides which candidates should move forward in the recruiting process.

 

Finally, the March Madness Championship Game takes place where the two best teams play each other head-to-head and one of them wins.  Similarly, Flexicrew often compares two finalists in detail against each other and recommends to you our favorite candidate that we believe should get offered the job.

 

Like a perceptive team coach, Flexicrew recruiters search for and recruit good talent just the way a team needs to fill out various positions.

 

At the end of the day, whether it’s a basketball team or a work team, it’s all about picking capable people, having a winning attitude and how you play the game!

 

Flexicrew hopes to team up with you to provide winners. Look forward to a small gift coming your way in a few days to remind you of how Flexicrew can help YOU be the CHAMPION!

Sincerely,

Your Flexicrew Team

HOT JOBS listed Today!

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Traveling Mechanic
Laboratory Assistant
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Construction Team Leader

Baton Rouge

Valve Mechanics
Machine Operator
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Millwright
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Manual Machinist
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Field Tech

New Orleans

Life Raft Tech
Assembly
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Mobile

40 hour Hazwoper Techs
Shipfitters
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Cold Warehouse Labor
Forklift Driver

Want lower Worker’s Comp Costs? Integrity Tests may be the answer

January 5th, 2015   •   employer of record, Employment Agency, jobs, Safety, workers compensation   •   no comments   

Lowering Workers’ Comp Claims:
Integrity Assessment Use Lowers Claims of Workers’ Compensation

Workers’ compensation claims are significantly lower for employers conducting pre-employment integrity testing, according to a recent research report by the Journal of Business and Psychology. The April 2011 study compared screened vs. unscreened workers in the service, manufacturing, and health care industries and examined the effectiveness of using an integrity test to reduce the frequency and severity of worker compensation claims.

Background
The researchers collected data from four different companies in four industries and found the same results in each company. After each company began using an integrity test in it’s hiring process, they found that over the next year those who had been screened with the integrity test had a significantly lower percent of worker compensation claims than those who had been hired before the integrity test screening began, even though accident statistics consistently show that new hires normally have the highest accident frequency rates.

Results
According to the study, the average cost per employee was dramatically less, plus the average cost per accident was also lower. The average cost per claim for the screened group was only 67% as much as the unscreened group – which is substantial enough for employers to justify screening all their job applicants.

Conclusion
These results strongly support the idea that an integrity test would be expected to make a significant reduction in the frequency and severity of worker compensation accidents.

Flexicrew’s test
Flexicrew uses a 100 point integrity test in all of our hiring decisions. We help you make a better choice in your employees.

www.flexicrew.com

Few Tips to Remember for Grilling Outdoors!

July 25th, 2014   •   Safety   •   no comments   

charcoal400

 

 

For many, summer is coming to an end as schools are getting ready to go back into session and the transition into the fall season is approaching.  Those who are going to do last minute BBQ’s or outdoor grilling we have a few reminders for grill safety.  Between 2007 and 2011 the National Fire Protection Association reported 8,800 fires as a result in grilling with gas and charcoal grills.  It is very important to have safe grilling practices to prevent grill accidents in future.   Here are a few tips to remember:

 

  • Make sure it is a well ventilated area
  • Keep the grill stable
  • Wear safe clothing
  • Use Long-Handled utensils
  • Keep fire under control
  • DO NOT leave a grill unattended

 

When we work with fire things are able to get out of hand very quickly!  By doing the few simple tips above we can help to prevent tragedy from striking in our homes and families.  More information on grill safety can be found at Hearth, Patio, & Barbecue Association (HPBA.org) and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA.org).

Can Eyewear Measure Your Fatigue?

July 8th, 2014   •   Employment Agency, National Safety Week, Safety, Staffing   •   no comments   

Edge_Safety_GlassesIn an article posted on Rigzone.com, Karen Boman takes a deeper look into how that is possible. An Australia based company called Optalert Limited has created drowsiness detection glasses.  These glasses have the ability to capture worker’s eyelid blinks through a tiny LED that has been built into the frame of the glasses.  Optalert Limited is the only safety system worldwide that has the ability to continuously provide information in real time. The system measures how fast and how far a person opens their eyelid after closing it.  The glasses then show a rating from 1-10 based on the John Drowsiness Scale.

Multiple things can factor into fatigue, irregular hours, shift work, and even poor eating habits. Worker safety has come to the forefront of employers mind’s given the long hours they spend working or traveling.  When designing a plan, companies try to take into account the shift and how long in between shifts in order to ensure the employee can have enough time for sleep before the next shift begins. It can be hard sometimes given the type of shift and even the number of employees on hand but thinking about employee safety is also important and should be held at a high standard.

The full article can be found on Rigzone.com.

Distracted Driving is on the Rise – Pledge to Stop With Us!

July 1st, 2014   •   Employment Agency, National Safety Week, Safety, Staffing   •   no comments   

The-Cost-of-Distracted-DrivingAccording to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 387,000 injuries occurred in motor vehicle crashes in 2011 due to distracted drivers.  Distracted driving is a daily occurrence that is growing among teens as well as working business professionals as they make their way from meeting to meeting.  As citizens, we have a responsibility to our fellowman to reduce the amount of motor vehicle crashes and traffic violations.

On June 24, 2014, 19 Flexicrew Staff members joined in taking the “Texting and Driving…It Can Wait” pledge on Itcanwait.com.  The Flexicrew Corporation feels  there are valid reasons why we should stop with distracted driving.  First, in most states, it is illegal ; if you must talk on the phone while driving, the reasonable solution is to acquire a hands free device in order to limit the distraction a cell phone in hand creates. Second, being considerate of those around us whether they are our passengers, other motorists, or other pedestrians will  lessen the guilt that could ultimately become our responsibility if an accident were to occur. Third, but certainly not last, distracted driving  strengthens the chances of being in an accident.  Drivers have a 23% more risk of getting in an accident while texting and driving.

At Flexicrew, we are agents of change and will  do our part in making our roads safer.   While we have made the pledge, we ask that you also make the pledge with us!  You can pledge at http://www.itcanwait.com and if you do, please be sure to let us know!

Hurricane Preparedness Week – Be Ready

 
When a natural disaster does strike, Flexicrew has a team that can help with the aftermath. Call us for any Environmental Techs that you might need.

 

Flexicrew also offers OSHA  Hazmat/Hazwopper training.

 

 GET READY!

Hurricanes are strong storms that can be life-threatening as well as cause serious property-threatening hazards such as flooding, storm surge, high winds and tornadoes. Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. Know the difference between the threat levels and plan accordingly. Know the difference between watches & warnings.

 

Hurricane Watch is issued when hurricane conditions are a threat within 48 hours. Review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued, and stay informed.

 

Hurricane Warning is issued when hurricane conditions are expected within 36 hours. Complete your storm preparations and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities. Follow these tips to make sure you and your  family are prepared to stay safe during and after a hurricane.

 

PREPARE

 

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical information from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • Check your disaster supplies. Replace or restock as needed.
  • Bring in anything that can be picked up by the wind (bicycles, lawn furniture).
  • Close your windows, doors and hurricane shutters. If you do not have hurricane shutters, close and board up all windows and doors with plywood.
  • Turn your refrigerator and freezer to the coldest setting. Keep them closed as much as possible so that food will last longer if the power goes out.
  • Turn off propane tank.
  • Unplug small appliances.
  • Fill your car’s gas tank.
  • Create a hurricane evacuation plan with members of your household. Planning and practicing your evacuation plan minimizes confusion and fear during the event.
  • Find out about your community’s hurricane response plan. Plan routes to local shelters, register family members with special medical needs and make plans for your pets to be cared for.
  • Obey evacuation orders. Avoid flooded roads and washed out bridges.

 

SUPPLIES

 

  • Water—at least a 3-day supply; one gallon per person per day
  • Food—at least a 3-day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare food
  • Flashlight
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible)
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Medications (7-day supply) and medical items (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, etc.)
  • Multi-purpose tool
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Family and emergency contact information
  • Extra cash
  • Emergency blanket
  • Map(s) of the area
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Tools/supplies for securing your home
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Rain gear
  • Insect repellent and sunscreen
  • Camera for photos of damage (Insurance Purposes)

 

WHAT TO DO AFTER A HURRICANE

 

  • Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates.
  • Stay alert for extended rainfall and subsequent flooding even after the hurricane or tropical storm has ended.
  • If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe.
  • Drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed out bridges.
  • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.
  • Stay out of any building that has water around it.
  • Inspect your home for damage. Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance purposes.
  • Use flashlights in the dark. Do NOT use candles.
  • Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until you are sure it’s not contaminated.
  • Check refrigerated food for spoilage. If in doubt, throw it out.
  • Wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up to avoid injury.
  • Watch animals closely and keep them under your direct control.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.

 

Hurricane Ivan flooding, Asheville, NC - September 2004/Leif Skoogfors, FEMA

 

Struck-by injuries – Look for Flying or Falling Objects

Am I In Danger?

You are at risk from falling objects when you are beneath  cranes, scaffolds, etc., or where overhead work is being performed.  There is a danger from flying objects when power tools, or activities like pushing, pulling, or prying, may cause objects to   become airborne. Injuries can range from minor abrasions to concussions, blindness, or death.

How Do I Avoid Hazards?

HardhatGeneral

  • Wear hardhats.
  • Stack materials to prevent sliding, falling, or collapse.
  • Use protective measures such as toeboards and debris nets.
Safety gogglesPower Tools, Machines, etc.

  • Use safety glasses, goggles, face shields, etc., where machines or tools may cause flying particles.
  • Inspect tools, such as saws and lathes, to insure that protective guards are in good condition.
  • Make sure you are trained in the proper operation of powder actuated tools.
CraneCranes and Hoists

  • Avoid working underneath loads being moved.
  • Barricade hazard areas and post warning signs.
  • Inspect cranes and hoists to see that all components, such as wire rope, lifting hooks, chains, etc., are in good condition.
  • Do not exceed lifting capacity of cranes and hoists.
BarricadeOverhead Work

  • Secure tools and materials to prevent them from falling on people below.
  • Barricade hazard areas and post warning signs.
  • Use toeboards, screens, or guardrails on scaffolds to prevent falling objects, or,
  • Use debris nets, catch platforms, or canopies to catch or deflect falling objects.
Air CompressorCompressed Air

  • Reduce compressed air used for cleaning to 30 psi, and only use with appropriate guarding and protective equipment.
  • Never clean clothing with compressed air.

National Safety Month – Slips Trips and Falls

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, slips, trips and falls make up the majority of general industry accidents, which account for:

  • 15% of all accidental deaths per year, the second-leading cause behind motor vehicles
  • About 25% of all reported injury claims per fiscal year
  • More than 95 million lost work days per year – about 65 percent of all work days lost

Fall-chart

 

In general, slips and trips occur due to a loss of traction between the shoe and the walking surface or an inadvertent contact with a fixed or moveable object which may lead to a fall. There are a variety of situations that may cause slips, trips and falls.

  • Wet or greasy floors
  • Dry floors with wood dust or powder
  • Uneven walking surfaces
  • Polished or freshly waxed floors
  • Loose flooring, carpeting or mats
  • Transition from one floor type to another
  • Missing or uneven floor tiles and bricks
  • Damaged or irregular steps; no handrails
  • Sloped walking surfaces
  • Shoes with wet, muddy, greasy or oily soles
  • Clutter
  • Electrical cords or cables
  • Open desk or file cabinet drawers
  • Damaged ladder steps
  • Ramps and gang planks without skid-resistant      surfaces
  • Metal surfaces – dock plates, construction plates
  • Weather hazards – rain, sleet, ice, snow, hail, frost
  • Wet leaves or pine needles

Here are six guidelines to help you create a safer working environment for you and your employees.

 

1) Create Good Housekeeping Practices
Good housekeeping is critical. Safety and housekeeping go hand-in-hand. If your facility’s housekeeping habits are poor, the result may be a higher incidence of employee injuries, ever-increasing insurance costs and regulatory citations. If an organization’s facilities cleaning up spillare noticeably clean and well organized, it is a good indication that its overall safety program is effective as well.

Proper housekeeping is a routine. It is an ongoing procedure that is simply done as a part of each worker’s daily performance. To create an effective housekeeping program, there are three simple steps to get you started

  • Plan ahead– Know what needs to be done, who’s going to do it and what the particular work area should look like when you are done.
  • Assign responsibilities– It may be necessary to assign a specific person or group of workers to clean up, although personal responsibility for cleaning up after himself/herself is preferred.
  • Implement a program– Establish housekeeping procedures as a part of the daily routine.

 

2) Reduce Wet or Slippery Surfaceswetfloorsignweb_
Walking surfaces account for a significant portion of injuries reported by state agencies. The most frequently reported types of surfaces where these injuries occur include

  • Parking lots
  • Sidewalks (or lack of)
  • Food preparation areas
  • Shower stalls in residential dorms
  • Floors in general

Traction on outdoor surfaces can change considerably when weather conditions change. Those conditions can then affect indoor surfaces as moisture is tracked in by pedestrian traffic. Traction control procedures should be constantly monitored for their effectiveness.

  • Keep parking lots and sidewalks clean and in good repair condition.
  • When snow and ice are present, remove or treat these elements. In some extreme cases, it may be necessary to suspend use of the area.
  • Use adhesive striping material or anti-skid paint whenever possible.

Indoor control measures can help reduce the incidence of slips and falls.

  • Use moisture-absorbent mats with beveled edges in  entrance areas. Make sure they have backing material that will not slide      on the floor.
  • Display “Wet Floor” signs as needed.
  • Use anti-skid adhesive tape in troublesome areas.
  • Clean up spills immediately. Create a procedure for taking the appropriate action when someone causes or comes across a food or drink spill.
  • Use proper area rugs or mats for food preparation areas.

 

3) Avoid Creating Obstacles in Aisles and Walkways
Injuries can also result in from trips caused by obstacles, clutter, materials and equipment in aisles, corridors, entranceways and stairwells. Proper housekeeping in work and traffic areas is still the most effective control measure in avoiding the proliferation of these types of hazards. This means having policies or procedures in place and allowing time for cleaning the area, especially where scrap material or waste is a by-product of the work operation.

  • Keep all work areas, passageways, storerooms and service areas clean and orderly.
  • Avoid stringing cords, cables or air hoses across hallways or in any designated aisle.
  • In office areas, avoid leaving boxes, files or briefcases in the aisles.
  • Encourage safe work practices such as closing file cabinet drawers after use and picking up loose items from the floor.
  • Conduct periodic inspections for slip and trip hazards.

 

4) Create and Maintain Proper Lighting
Poor lighting in the workplace is associated with an increase in accidents.

  • Use proper illumination in walkways, staircases, ramps, hallways, basements, construction areas and dock areas.
  • Keep work areas well lit and clean.
  • Upon entering a darkened room, always turn on the light first.
  • Keep poorly lit walkways clear of clutter and obstructions.
  • Keep areas around light switches clear and accessible.
  • Repair fixtures, switches and cords immediately if they malfunction.

 

5) Wear Proper Shoes
The shoes we wear can play a big part in preventing falls. The slickness of the soles and the type of heels worn need to be evaluated to avoid slips, trips and falls. Shoelaces need to be tied correctly. Whenever a fall-related injury is investigated, the footwear needs to be evaluated to see if it contributed to the incident. Employees are expected to wear footwear appropriate for the duties of their work task.

 

6) Control Individual Behavior
This condition is the toughest to control. It is human nature to let our guard down for two seconds and be distracted by random thoughts or doing multiple activities. Being in a hurry will result in walking too fast or running which increases the chances of a slip, trip or fall. Taking shortcuts, not watching where one is going, using a cell phone, carrying materials which obstructs the vision, wearing sunglasses in low-light areas, not using designated walkways and speed are common elements in many on-the-job injuries.

It’s ultimately up to each individual to plan, stay alert and pay attention.

 

National Safety Month – Prescription Pain Med Abuse

This week’s focus – Prescription Drug Abuse.

Please take a few moments to inform yourself of the dangers and how it affects all of us.

Death from painkillers higher than prescription drugs

 

 

image 5 poppingpills-image 5  poppingpills-image 3 poppingpills-image 4 poppingpills-image 2

Hurricane Preparation

June 2nd, 2014   •   Employment Agency, National Safety Week, Safety, Staffing   •   no comments   

Hurricanes are strong storms that can be life-threatening as well as cause serious property-threatening hazards such as flooding, storm surge, high winds and tornadoes. Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. Know the difference hurricane tropicbetween the threat levels and plan accordingly. Know the difference between watches & warnings. Hurricane Watch is issued when hurricane conditions are a threat within 48 hours. Review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued, and stay informed. Hurricane Warning is issued when hurricane conditions are expected within 36 hours. Complete your storm preparations and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities. Follow these tips to make sure you and your  family are prepared to stay safe during and after a hurricane.

PREPARE

 

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical information from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • · Check your disaster supplies. Replace or restock as needed.
  • · Bring in anything that can be picked up by the wind (bicycles, lawn furniture).
  • · Close your windows, doors and hurricane shutters. If you do not have hurricane shutters, close and board up all windows and doors with plywood.
  • · Turn your refrigerator and freezer to the coldest setting. Keep them closed as much as possible so that food will last longer if the power goes out.
  • · Turn off propane tank.
  • · Unplug small appliances.
  • · Fill your car’s gas tank.
  • · Create a hurricane evacuation plan with members of your household. Planning and practicing your evacuation plan minimizes confusion and fear during the event.
  • · Find out about your community’s hurricane response plan. Plan routes to local shelters, register family members with special medical needs and make plans for your pets to be cared for.
  • · Obey evacuation orders. Avoid flooded roads and washed out bridges.

 

SUPPLIES

 

  • Water—at least a 3-day supply; one gallon per person per day
  • Food—at least a 3-day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare foodhurricane road
  • Flashlight
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible)
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Medications (7-day supply) and medical items (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, etc.)
  • Multi-purpose tool
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items
  • Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)
  • Cell phone with chargers
  • Family and emergency contact information
  • Extra cash
  • Emergency blanket
  • Map(s) of the area
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Tools/supplies for securing your home
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Rain gear
  • Insect repellent and sunscreen
  • Camera for photos of damage (Insurance Purposes)

 

WHAT TO DO AFTER A HURRICANE

 

  • Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio or the local news for the latest updates.
  • Stay alert for extended rainfall and subsequent flooding even after the hurricane or tropical storm has ended.
  • If you evacuated, return home only when officials say it is safe.
  • Drive only if necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed out bridges.
  • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the power company.
  • Stay out of any building that has water around it.
  • Inspect your home for damage. Take pictures of damage, both of the building and its contents, for insurance purposes.
  • Use flashlights in the dark. Do NOT use candles.
  • Avoid drinking or preparing food with tap water until you are sure it’s not contaminated.
  • Check refrigerated food for spoilage. If in doubt, throw it out.
  • Wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up to avoid injury.
  • Watch animals closely and keep them under your direct control.
  • Use the telephone only for emergency calls.

 

 

 

TURN AROUND DON’T DROWN

May 29th, 2014   •   Employment Agency, Environmental Disaster Cleanup, Safety, Staffing   •   no comments   

During hurricane preparedness week, and together with safety awareness month, Flexicrew wanted to stress the importance of knowing when NOT to drive in standing water.

 

What Can I Do to Avoid Getting Caught is This Situation?

Most flood-related deaths and injuries could be avoided if people who come upon areas covered with water followed this simple advice:  TURN AROUND DON’T DROWN.

The reason that so many people drown during flooding is because few of them realize the incredible power of water.

  • A mere six inches of fast-moving flood  water can knock over an adult.
  • It takes only two feet of rushing water to carry away most vehicles. This includes pickups and SUVs.

If you come to an area that is covered with water, you will not know the depth of the water or the condition of the ground under the water. This is especially true at night, when your vision is more limited.

 
Play it smart, play it safe. Whether driving or walking, any time you come to a flooded road,  TURN AROUND DON’T DROWN.

Follow these safety rules:

turn around don't drown

  • Monitor your favorite news source for vital weather related information.
  • If flooding occurs, get to higher ground. Get out of areas subject  to flooding. This includes dips, low spots, canyons, washes etc.
  • Avoid areas already flooded, especially if the water is flowing fast.Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. TURN AROUND DON’T DROWN
  • Road beds may be washed out under flood waters. NEVER drive through flooded roadways.  TURN AROUND DONT DROWN.
  • Do not camp or park your vehicle along streams and washes, particularly  during threatening conditions.
  • Be especially cautious at night when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.

 

When approaching water on a roadway, always remember Turn Around Don’t Drown.

NATIONAL SAFETY MONTH – JUNE

May 27th, 2014   •   Employment Agency, jobs, Safety, Staffing, Uncategorized, workers compensation   •   no comments   

June is National Safety Month and we want to see our employees working safely on the jobsite and of course show it off on our Facebook page. As our recruiters conduct random site audits and jobsite visits, we’re going to be snapping a quick picture of one employee or a small groups who are working safely.

Photos will be judged by a committee. Contest will last from June 1- June 30 and winners will be announced July 7th.

1st PLACE:$25 Gift Card-Contract Employee(s) in Photo Flexicrew Employees

2nd PLACE: $20 Gift Card-Contract Employee(s) in Photo

3rd PLACE: $10 Gift Card-Contract Employee(s) in Photo

Safety boots: One size does not fit all

March 7th, 2014   •   employer of record, Employment Agency, jobs, Safety, Staffing, workers compensation   •   no comments   

safety shoesWhen it comes to protective footwear on the job, no single work boot meets the needs of all employees. Every jobsite or work environment is different, and different occupations require distinct, purpose-built features. Whether you purchase PPE directly for employees, offer them vouchers or facilitate on-site mobile truck visits, it is imperative that you coach your workers on the proper foot protection for their specific working conditions.

To help guide you and your team to the right footwear, here are 14 common occupations and some key features to look for in work boots for each:

Bricklayers/Masons. Look for 6-to-8-inch lace-up boots for ankle protection and support and cushioned outsoles/footbeds for comfort on concrete. Select boots with oil-tanned leathers for resistance to lime and calcium.

Carpenters. For these workers, seek boots featuring a welt outsole with shank and defined heel for climbing ladders. Choose boots with waterproof leather for outdoor work.

Plaster/Drywall Contractors. These specialists often wear boots with wedge outsoles for traction. You may extend the life of these boots with toe armor or boot bumpers. Choose oil-tanned leathers for resistance to lime and calcium.

Construction Workers. These craftsmen need tight-grain, oil-tanned leather for resistance to hydraulic fluid and wet/dry cycles outdoors. Select harder soles for rough duty, with proper tread for uneven terrain.

HVAC Professionals. Like construction workers, HVAC technicians perform at multiple sites and in varying conditions throughout the day. Look for boots that are waterproof for outdoor conditions with cushioned outsoles/footbeds for comfort on concrete. Also, choose boots with flat outsoles that don’t track dirt when going into and out of homes.

Farmers/Ranchers. These individuals should seek pull-on or lace-up boots for ankle protection and support. Look for oil-tanned, waterproof leathers for exposure to wetness and fertilizers. Farmers and ranchers working in rough and tumble environments should select boots with a more aggressive tread for traction.

Truck Drivers. Choose boots with lighter weight leather for flexibility and comfort while driving, and harder soles that wear better on metal steps and asphalt. Cushioned outsoles/footbeds reduce shock absorption.

Electricians. Electrical hazard protection is, of course, a must. Beyond that, electricians should look for boots with a welt sole and shank, and a defined heel for climbing ladders. Cushioned outsoles/footbeds add comfort on concrete.

Landscapers. Oil-tanned, waterproof leathers stand up to exposure to fertilizers. Landscapers should choose boots with strong heel counters to reduce walkover in wet, uneven terrain. Look for flat tread, wedge outsoles that won’t tear up new installations.

Mechanics and Machinists. Select boots or shoes with oil/slip-resistant urethane outsoles for traction, and direct-attach or sealed-welt construction for resistance to petroleum products.

Well Drillers. Consider logger-style lace-up boots with strong waterproof leather for wet conditions. Hard outsoles with deep cleats are ideal for grip in loose soil.

Plumbers. These specialists should seek boots with waterproof leathers, supporting shank and defined heels for climbing ladders. Flat soles pick up less dirt and are ideal for going into and out of homes.

Cold Weather Safety Gear

Safety precautions for cold weather work: More than just clothes

 

“There is no such thing as bad weather; only bad clothing.” ~Norwegian Proverb

 

While wearing proper (clean, dry and insulated) clothing is crucial for working outdoors in cold weather, it’s not the only precaution hi-vis-winter-coverallyou need to take. There are many less obvious preventative measures you should take to ensure a safe work site in cold weather.

 

Bulky clothing tends to limit one’s mobility, causing falls and other accidents. Be aware of your surroundings and adjust your work style according to your extra clothing.

 

Dehydration is often overlooked; the importance of wearing protective clothing is always encouraged, but many forget the importance of drinking water. Wearing multiple layers of clothing causes workers to sweat, even in the cold temperatures. Pumping extra fluids is necessary, but also make sure they’re the right ones. Coffee may look like the best option – warm with a boost – but caffeine is a diuretic. Drink water, and lots of it.

 

Speaking of caffeine – other beverages, such as soda and energy drinks, shouldn’t be consumed in excess while working in cold weather. While tired employees run a greater risk of getting injured on the job site, these drinks make you jittery and cause you to crash once the caffeine wears off.

 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) offers advice to employers and employees on taking necessary precautions to prevent and treat cold-related health problems:

  • Recognize the environmental and workplace conditions that may be dangerous.
  • Learn the signs and symptoms of cold-induced illnesses and injuries and what to do to help employees.
  • Encourage employees to wear proper clothing for cold, wet and windy conditions, including layers that can be adjusted to changing conditions.
  • Be sure that employees in extremely cold conditions take frequent, short breaks in warm and dry shelters to allow their bodies to warm up.
  • Try to schedule work for the warmest part of the day.
  • Avoid exhaustion or fatigue because energy is needed to keep muscles warm.
  • Use the buddy system: work in pairs so that one employee can recognize danger signs.
  • Eat warm, high-calorie foods such as hot pasta dishes.
  • Drink warm, sweet beverages (sugar water, sports-type drinks) and avoid drinks with caffeine (coffee, tea, sodas or hot chocolate).

Lifting Safely

October 9th, 2013   •   Employment Agency, jobs, Safety, Uncategorized, workers compensation   •   no comments   

Each day in some form or fashion you do lifting in this facility and at home. Lifting safely is one the most important things you can do to protect your back throughout your lifetime.lifting back pain
Back Strain and Back Injury Cause Serious Pain and Disability
The back supports the body. One wrong move or repeated stress on weak back muscles can cause pain and injury.
• Back injuries are one of the most common causes of work-related disability.
• Back pain is the second-leading cause of lost work days, after the common cold.
• Once back strain occurs, it often returns.
• Back injury often requires extended bed rest and, in some cases, surgery.

Personal Habits Can Make Back Injury More Likely

You’re more likely to have a back injury if you’re in poor physical condition, overweight, under stress, have poor posture, or overexert yourself.
• Regular exercise can strengthen back and stomach muscles.
• Always consult your doctor before starting an exercise program.
• Sit and stand straight; poor posture strains the back.
• Be realistic about what you can carry and what you can do; overdoing can cause lasting damage.

Gravity Always Wins

September 16th, 2013   •   jobs, Safety, Staffing, unemployment, workers compensation   •   no comments   

Ladder Safety

Gravity never forgets. As soon as you set foot on the ladder’s first rung and pull your body off the ground, gravity works to bring you back to earth. Therefore, it’s no surprise that ladder safety begins from the ground up.ladder-safety

Start with a good foundation

 

Proper ladder setup will help prevent slips and falls. Place the base on a firm, solid surface. Avoid slippery, wet or soft surfaces. If you must put the ladder on a soft surface, place a board under the ladder’s feet to provide firm footing. Make sure the top of the ladder has firm support as well.

 

Never lean a ladder against a window pane or other unstable surface. If you’re using a straight or extension ladder, the angle of the ladder is the next critical safety factor. A straight or extension ladder should be placed 1 foot away from the surface it rests against for every 4 feet of ladder height. For example, if the ladder is 4 feet high, the bottom of the ladder should be 1 foot away from the support surface.

 

If you use a ladder to access a roof or platform, make sure the ladder extends at least 3 feet over the roof or platform edge. Be sure to securely fasten straight and extension ladders to the upper support. If you have angled the ladder properly and still have doubts about its stability, have someone hold the ladder before climbing up.

 

If you’re using a step ladder, be sure to open it completely before you climb. If you have to use a step ladder near a doorway, lock or barricade the door and post signs so no one will open it and knock you off the ladder.

 

Climb with care

When you climb, always face the ladder and grip the rungs of the ladder to climb, not the side rails. Never get on or off a ladder from the side ladder_safety_falling_accidentunless it has been secured to prevent movement.

 

Never climb with equipment in your hands. Use your pockets, equipment belt, or a tool pouch and raise heavy objects with a hand line. If you forget something, always climb down the ladder to retrieve it yourself; don’t have someone toss it up to you. And never ask someone to climb up your ladder to give you supplies. It is dangerous to exceed the weight limits that a specific ladder can handle.

 

When you descend a ladder, practice the same safety rules. Face the ladder, keep your body square and hold on to the rungs. Lastly, step off at the bottom rung of the ladder. Never jump off of a ladder.

 

Think before you carry

Before you start to haul a ladder around, evaluate the area where you’ll be working. Ladders can be heavy and unwieldy. You can strike another person or object, or hit electrical power lines. Make the ladder as compact as possible before transporting it. Carry it horizontally while tilting it higher in front and lower in back. If the ladder is particularly long and heavy, get a coworker to help you carry it.

 

Follow the rules

  • Ladder safety may seem simple, but injuries occur every year. Below are some ladder safety dos and don’ts:ladder_safety
  • Use the right ladder for the job.
  • Inspect the ladder before and after a job.
  • Read all warning labels carefully and follow directions before you climb.
  • Clean the ladder after each use to prevent dirt buildup.
  • Wear clean, dry, slip-resistant shoes and use ladders with slip resistant feet.
  • Don’t stand any higher than the third rung from the top of the ladder.
  • Don’t lean too far or overreach. Reposition the ladder closer to the work instead.
  • Don’t use a ladder as a bridge or scaffold.
  • Don’t put a ladder on a box, barrel or other object to gain additional height.
  • Don’t use a damaged or unsafe ladder.

 

Experts also warn about ladder use in bad weather. Descend immediately if high winds, rain or other inclement weather begins. Wind force can blow you off the ladder. Rain can make the rungs and the ground slippery. Bitter cold can make metal ladders more brittle and can cause other structural damage. If you encounter bad weather while on a ladder, do not speed up to finish the job and risk injury. Wait to finish the job until conditions are once again safe.

 

Remember, don’t let gravity get you down. Practice ladder safety rules every time you climb to make your work easier, faster and safer.

Ask The Flexpert! – Spoggles

August 27th, 2013   •   Employment Agency, jobs, Safety, Uncategorized, workers compensation   •   no comments   

We are having a lot of eye injuries, debris getting in and causing pain and irritation. Does Flexicrew have any new ideas on how to avoid this? 

Great question! We were dealing with this very same issue recently.

The answer might weirdly enough be – SPOGGLES.

So, for those of you not in the environmental health and safety field, Spoggles is an industry term for safety eyewear designed to prevent airborne dust and debris from getting in our eyeballs. Airborne dust and debris is a leading cause of eye injuries in today’s workplaces.

Spoggles = Safety + Goggles, with a random “p” thrown in there since “sgoggles” or “sagoggles” or “safoggles” sound even weirder.

The glasses/goggles are supposed to seal up against your face (via the foam inserts at the interior edges of the lenses), and keep dust out of your eyes. There are potential issues with spoggles, and reasons why people sometimes choose not to wear their personal protective equipment (PPE) when doing work in a dusty environment:

  • the glasses fog upFlexpert!
  • the glasses can get scratched so it is hard to see
  • the foam can get “smushed” (technical term) and be less effective
  • when you take off your glasses, the dust that was at the top and sides/edges of the glasses (and in your eyebrows) can fall right into your eye anyway
  • some people think they look nerdy (also a technical term)
  • the earpieces can irritate the heck out of the back of your ears

 

But looking nerdy and having to take care of your PPE and using good personal hygiene while at work are a small price to pay compared to losing your eyesight or getting a nasty infection in your eye from contaminated dust.

So our Flexpert’s advice – Keep a supply of spoggles on hand. With some lanyards. And some no-fog.

And to sum up: spoggles are real. Spoggles are good. Spoggles may save your eyesight. Wear them if you have them.

hornet dx spoggles

 

SAFETY SPOTLIGHT – Teen Driving

August 22nd, 2013   •   Employment Agency, Safety, Staffing   •   no comments   

teen driving

Safe Teen Driving

Learning to drive is often considered a rite of passage for teenagers. But with the reward of being a new driver comes real risk. Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States, taking the lives of eight teens a day. CDC’s Injury Center is committed to preventing teen crashes and related deaths and injuries.

According to a CDC study, the annual number of 16- and 17-year-old drivers involved in fatal crashes decreased by 36% from 2004 to 2008. The study states that graduated driver licensing (GDL) laws, or teen driving laws, that exist in 49 states can be credited at least in part for the reduction in death rates. These laws limit driving under high risk conditions for newly-licensed drivers, such as driving at night and transporting other teen passengers.

However, since one out of every three teen deaths is the result of a motor vehicle crash, further reductions in teen crashes and related injuries are essential. CDC’s new “Parents Are the Key” campaign and “Policy Impact: Teen Driver Safety” issue brief can help parents, policymakers, and others take steps to save young lives.

Parents Are the Key” Campaign Launched Nationallysafe teen driving

CDC developed the “Parents Are the Key” campaign to help inform parents across the nation about the key role they can—and should—play in protecting their teen drivers. Individuals and groups can use the “Parents Are the Key” campaign materials to help parents learn about the most dangerous driving situations for their young driver and how to avoid them. All of the campaign materials—including a parent-teen safe driving agreement, posters, fact sheets, video, social media tools, implementation guide, and more—are available free of charge at www.cdc.gov/parentsarethekey

The Top 4 Causes of Construction Injuries

May 8th, 2013   •   Employment Agency, jobs, Safety, Staffing, Uncategorized   •   no comments   

Anyone involved in the construction industry would know that construction safety accidents are part and parcel of the industry. However, this only means that you should be doing all you can to make sure that they don’t occur.

The next best thing to completely eliminating accidents is reducing them, or at least reducing the risk of them occurring.

If you want to achieve this goal, you have to first understand what the main causes of accidents and deaths are on US construction sites. Providing a solution to a problem is not impossible without first knowing the causes of a problem.

You can divide all construction safety accidents into 4 main categories, listed below:

Electrical constructionElectrical Incidents

Electricity is such an essential part of our daily lives that we sometimes tend to take it for granted. More importantly, we take for granted how dangerous a safety hazard such as electricity can really be. The OSHA or otherwise known as the Occupational Safety & Health Administration says that workers should not work near an electrical power circuit unless they are wearing adequate protection. Below are a number of hazards that electricity can pose:

– Contact with power lines

– Equipment not used properly

– Extension cords not used properly

 

falls scaffoldingFalls

Construction always involves people climbing great heights. In the American construction industry, the leading cause of deaths is falls, and as a result, it must be treated seriously and appropriately. All construction safety plans must contain provisions in order to protect workers from falling from dangerous heights. Here are a couple of hazards to manage:

– Unprotected sides

– Bad scaffold construction

– Portable ladders not used properly

 

Struck-By

This category refers to dangerous contact between humans and heavy equipment. In the great majority of cases, cranes and trucks are the main cause of accidents and deaths. Apart from heavy vehicles, you must also watch out for falling objects and unstable walls.

 

trenching and evacuationTrenching & Evacuation

Contrary to popular belief, cave-ins are not the leading cause of accidents and fatalities when it comes to trenching. Here are a couple of other hazards to watch out for:

– Not having enough oxygen in a closed space (which leads to asphyxiation)

– Toxic fumes

– Drowning

– Unexpected contact with underground pipes and lines

 

 

Now that you know the leading causes of Construction Safety Accidents, it’s time to make sure that you are aware of your surroundings and to report any issues to your supervisor or to Flexicrew.