Introducing the Employer Advocate

Launching Flexicrew’s Employer Advocate

We’re very excited to launch Flexicrew’s Employer Advocate.  We will post on many issues – from using a staffing agency to using seasonal workers, from risk of law violation in hiring, to retention of quality talent.

Talent acquisition and workforce management are difficult, so we will provide tips and shortcuts from our experience.

The tone will be serious and conservative – meaning factual – but with a light touch to make dry subjects readable.

Employer Advocate Feedback

Periodically, we will ask for your feedback by having a periodic survey or poll on the blog.

We hope you ask questions about what interests you because the Employer Advocate must be a useful tool for you. In other words, we plan to blog what you want to read.

Employer Advocate Content

How will we achieve this?

In the first place, the blog will offer content in several categories:

  • Staffing agency
  • Temporary employees
  • Industry trends
  • Best safety practices
  • Useful resources from the web
  • Flexicrew Company
  • News
  • Valuable insights from human resource articles

 

So, welcome to Employer Advocate blog, the online magazine devoted to:
• Helping you take the next steps in managing your workforce.
• Getting the most productivity out of your workplace
• Enhancing your career
• Meeting your goals.

Explore content focusing on important aspects related to achieving your ambitions and balancing your personal life on your path to career success.

Your Turn

In fact, please give us your feedback  and pass along any topics you would like us to address.

9 Tips to Help Your Employees Keep Their Heads in the Game – March Madness

March 14th, 2018   •   Employment Agency, Productivity, Staffing, Temp Service, Temporary Staffing   •   no comments   

 So much office productivity is lost during March Madness basketball season. And it isn’t going away anytime soon. So why not make the best of the situation? Who knows? You might even win it all and get bragging rights for the remainder of the year!

 

9 Tips to Increase Productivity During March Madness

  1. Refs review the rules.

    Supervisors should review the company rules with all staff concerning work breaks and use of the internet for non-work related activities. So everyone is clear on what’s acceptable when it comes to March Madness.

  2. Lead the fast break.

    Set the example by not getting sidelined from duties. If you complete assignments before talking hoops, team members will likely follow your lead.

  3. Diagram the play.

    Set goals and make sure work activities are scheduled for each day. Having them write downHiring - Call Flexicrew a daily to-do list helps them stay engaged.

  4. Team jerseys.

    Let workers wear their favorite team’s apparel or decorate their work areas to get in the mood.

  5. Bring on the competition.

    Think about forming a competition where members can pick their favorites individually or in small groups and winners can rib their work-mates about their success in a friendly way. Your company could even award small prizes to winners.

  6. Stay out of foul trouble.

    Make sure workers put away their cell phones. This helps minimize the impulse to keep sneaking a peek for scores, texts from friends or social media updates that can distract them from their activities.

  7. Grant timeouts. Staying productive doesn’t mean nose to the grindstone 8 hours a day – That’s unrealistic. It’s okay to allow employees 5-minute breaks to review scores, check their brackets, or chat with co-workers about the tourney to re-energize and refocus.
  8. Save it for halftime. Suggest workers schedule lunch times with other March Madness fans. Within a defined time, they can discuss the results and scores to their heart’s content to get it out of their systems during off-company hours
  9. Bring in your bench players. If your team wants to request time off to watch the tournament, have them put in for it in advance so you’re not caught short-handed. That way you can manage workloads and determine if temporary help is to meet required deadlines. If you need, we know a good temp staffing firm (www.flexicew.com) who can help you meet your temporary short-time employment needs.
    Flexicrew has a solid gameplan for maintaining March Madness productivity. Just give us a call and pass the ball into our court.

     

Ask the Flexpert…What is a JSA and should I be using them?

What is a JSA and should I be using them?

 

A JSA – Job Safety Analysis – is the most common type of general safety preparation employers can take against health and safety hazards on the job. It is usually a simple form that structures a quick hazard analysis that field supervision can use every day.

 

A JSA should be done before you start a task, after an accident or near miss, and if a new condition or hazard presents on the job.

 

How Do I use a JSA?

  1. Step back and examine the job you’re about to perform with fresh eyes, unclouded by routine and alert to potential hazards related to the scope of work. Be the detective and look for clues that you wouldn’t normally look for when performing your task.
  2. Look closely at how a job is done and what sort of tools and machinery people are working with.
  3. Notice any obvious hazards, then look deeper to see if you can uncover any hidden hazards. These are usually not intentionally hidden, they just might need a new set of objective eyes on them to notice the hazard.
  4. Are there controls in place already to prevent injury around the workplace hazards you have discovered? Discuss all hazards with the crew. Also discuss any controls that are in place to eliminate or mitigate them. Any hazards that have not been addressed should be documented and either mitigated or eliminated prior to starting work.
  5. If you’re working with a temp service or an employment agency, be sure to inform them of any hazards that employees need to be aware of.
  6. Everyone on the crew participates in the JSA. The people doing the job everyday are the best detectives!
  7. Fill out the document and get this paperwork in the hands of the Safety and Risk department or management ASAP.

 

Good detective work! You may have just saved a life.

JSA Job Safety Analysis

6 Ways to Become a Best Place to Work

 

Best Place to Work - Flexicrew

Usually, an employment agency offering a temp service to their clients have a range of experience with clients who have diverse work processes and office cultures. We thought an employment agency may be a good source to suggest some good tips for becoming a best place to work.

 

We know we must have boring old rules in the workplace for efficiency and safety. But employees also need to feel satisfied and fulfilled to stay with that company. Comfortable, satisfied employees lead to reduced turnover, reducing costs.

 

6 Tips for turning your company into a Best Place to Work

Don’t micromanage

An ideal workplace should not micromanage every detail of the work day. Good leadership will encourage all employees to practice quality independent work habits. These habits shouldn’t interfere with the results of others and result in goals being met. Everyone should be encouraged to respect and learn from the style of the others.

Even contractual or part-time workers, provided by a temp service or an employment agency, can and should be given autonomy if they demonstrate good work habits.

 

Managers should be welcoming and open

All new hires should be recognized as important parts of the company and be introduced as such. If done well, they will feel themselves to be an integrated part of their organization and give their best from the beginning.

New employees should not feel scared of approaching their supervisors or managers in case of any difficulty in doing their work. All team members should receive equal guidance and professional support from company managers.

 

Give Recognition

Employees crave recognition. Some studies show it is more important than pay or rank. Newer employees should be recognized for even nominal achievements so that they know they are fitting in and growing into the position.

 Sometimes the process of giving some inexpensive token, like a pen or a T-shirt, can also enhance the enthusiasm of employees. If employees have suggestions for changes in the existing system, hear them out. If the suggestion is worth being adopted, great! Give them a shout out for the idea. If not, explain why but encourage them to continue to come to you with new ideas.

 

Provide Regular Training

Trained employees are better employees. Employees given access to training feel supported in their roles. Also, corporate goals can be regularly reinforced with the latest research and methods related to company processes.

Other added benefits are that well trained employees will be able to deliver better service to clients. Also, these more well-rounded employees are better prepare to move up the corporate ladder when needed.

 

Point out weaknesses privately

Employees who make mistakes in their work should not be reprimanded in front of others. This can lead to demoralization and animosity among the team.

Rather, call the employee aside and speak privately. Weaknesses can be pointed out quietly and the processes redirected to improve work habits or attitude.

 

Set reasonable expectations

There is a lot  of info out there on how to set a reasonable workload for employees and when enough is enough.   When it’s too much, the employee turnover rate is high and the corporate reputation suffers. Good potential candidates will think again about working for your company because they don’t want to work in such a stress-filled environment.

 

Another effect of increased workload is the risk of accidents. Give every employee an amount of work which he/she will be able to complete successfully without error or injury.

Don’t be a workhouse, but a place where everyone comes ready and willing to work and each has a degree of flexibility that they individually control.

 

Help create happiness and be a Best Place to Work.

 

By Will Brennan, Oldest Intern in the Staffing Industry