10 Skills you need to get a job NOW

You recently graduated. You’ve prepared your resume and sent it to various hiring managers. Your resume is great and the cover letter clearly states Shutterstock - Businesswhy you are the best candidate for the job. You get an interview call. You get there well-dressed and on-time. You make eye contact with your interviewer, communicate effectively, and answer most questions with confidence. You get hired. Why? Probably because you’ve displayed the skills the employer desired.

 

However, these skills do not come easy for many graduates, skills which they failed to learn in their probably very expensive education.

 

What skills are sought by the employers?

 

In a recent GMAT survey nearly 600 employers were asked about the skills they look for when hiring new business graduates. The following statement by a technical recruiter  sums up the response, “Communications, teamwork, and interpersonal skills are critical—everything we do involves working with other people.”

 

The following prioritized set of skills and abilities are the most desirable:

 

  1. Working in a team

 

  1. Making decisions and solve problems (tie)

 

  1. Communicating verbally inside and outside an organization

 

  1. Planning, organizing and prioritizing work

 

  1. Retrieving and processing information

 

  1. Analyzing quantitative data

 

  1. Job specific technical knowledge

 

  1. Proficient with computer software programs

 

  1. Creating and/or editing written reports

 

  1. Persuading and influencing others

 

What makes it difficult for the employers to recruit talent?

 

According to a 2015 Talent Search global survey by recruiting firm ManpowerGroup, including 41,700 employers in 42 countries, one in three employers said that there just aren’t enough applicants. But other major reasons are related to the available applicant’s skills and abilities.

 

  • For example, 34% of them said that the candidates lack the required technical competencies (industry-specific professional qualifications and industry-specific skilled trades’ certifications).
  • In addition, 22% hiring managers cited that lack of experience is behind talent shortages and
  • 17% report soft skills deficits (particularly lack of professionalism, enthusiasm, motivation and a learning mindset).

 

Possible solutions?

 

The single most critical factor in bridging the technical and soft skills gap is improving the quality of “hands-on” education. The students need more real life experiences, project based learning, internships, co-op programs. They will then get to confront, discuss, and solve real world issues/problems.

Business leaders must communicate what skills are desirable, offer tools and resources, and collaborate with educators/institutions to showcase and demonstrate the ‘teamwork and communication’ they expect of their potential new hires.

5 Steps That Will Help You Change Careers

Changing careers takes focus and commitment. To be successful, you’ll need to develop short-term, intermediate and long-term goals, and decide on the steps you’ll need to accomplish them. Once you do that, it will be a lot easier to take the plunge into a new line of work.
time for change

 

 

 

  1. Start by researching the marketplace to identify expanding industries. Search the Labor Department’s Occupational Outlook Handbook, job boards and the business press to see what’s areas are most in demand.

 

  1. Next, take assessment tests to discover your hidden talents and jobs that fit them. Leading tests include the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Strong Interest Inventory and Campbell Interest & Skill Survey. Also, ask individuals you know personally and professionally for their insight into occupations that might be a strong fit for your background and skills.

 

  1. Once you’ve decided on a new path, do some online research and networking to determine the skills you’ll need to qualify for jobs that interest you. If you lack key credentials, consider signing up for volunteer work enrolling in classes to bridge the gap.

 

  1. Next, revamp your résumé to highlight skills and experiences that are most relevant to your desired new line of work. A professional career coach may be able to help.

 

  1. When applying for jobs, craft cover letters that will help employers understand why you’re looking to change careers and how you can add value. Similarly, prepare for interviews by crafting 30-second introduction that sums up what you can do for employers.

Staffing Companies Help a Struggling US Economy

Since 2008, most Americans have struggled right along with a lagging economy. But job growth through the staffing industry has helped fight both unemployment and underemployment.

More than 2.91 million people are employed by staffing agencies every business day, according to the American Staffing Association. A total of 11.5 million contract employees are hired by staffing firms every year, 80 percent of them working full time.

 

   

   

   

Four out of five clients believe staffing firms provide a good service in finding people who can become permanent employees.

   

   

   

Among other benefits of contract work, the staffing industry offers employees a path to permanent employment, according to the Association. Workers benefit, too, as 88 percent of contract employees believe that working in a temporary or contract position made them more employable overall.

 

Flexibility a growing desire among workers
Some staffing opponents say that the lack of permanency for contract employees adds stress to their situation, but many workers believe differently. Most surveyed employees cite that the added flexibility in projects and daily work is seen as a plus. An amazing 23 percent outright prefer the shifting responsibilities of contract work to traditional employment, according to the Association’s figures. A third of staffing employees said they enjoy the challenges of tackling different jobs .

 

Flexicrew wants to recognize all those who make an impact to our nation’s workforce and economy as a contract worker. We are proud to be part of something bigger than ourselves.

 

Contact us to learn more about Flexicrew’s job opportunities and staffing services.

 

www.flexicrew.com

251-443-1130

info@flexicrew.com

Industrial Carpenter Mobile AL Drywall Plaster Concrete Brick

March 27th, 2014   •   Job Postings, jobs, Mobile, AL Job Openings, Uncategorized, unemployment   •   no comments   

Industrial Carpenters -Must have 3-5 years experience and have dependable transportation. please see below job descriptions.

1. Designs, constructs, remodels, retrofits and repairs interior and exterior structures made of wood,

drywall, plaster, concrete or brick.

2. Designs, constructs, retrofits, and repairs cabinets, tables, shelves, benches, partitions, flooring, door

and window frames, and other types of furniture. May install and repair modular furniture.

3. Secures furniture for earthquake preparedness.

4. Cleans, maintains, adjusts, calibrates and services equipment used in the performance of duties.

 

See www.flexicrew.com/openings for all current openings.

Millwrights, Pipe Welders, Structural Welders, Carpenters, Fitters

March 27th, 2014   •   Job Postings, jobs, Mobile, AL Job Openings, unemployment   •   no comments   

 

All sorts of positions available in the Mobile area! Need a job? Check out our most current job listings here http://flexicrew.com/openings/

– Millwrights- must have 5 years experience

– General Labors steady work

– Industrial/Environmental Leadman- must have experience in industrial plants with environmental and vacuum work.

– Construction Carpenter- Must have 3-5 years experience

Structural and Pipe Welders and Fitters- 3-5 years experience in industrial and shipyard

– Tig Welders- must have 3-5 years experience

– General Labor- (MCINTOSH, AL AREA) must be hard working and dependable

– Sprinkler Fitter Helpers- must have 2 years experience be willing to travel

 

Call  251-443-1130  or apply online www.flexicrew.com

Cold Weather Safety Gear

Safety precautions for cold weather work: More than just clothes

 

“There is no such thing as bad weather; only bad clothing.” ~Norwegian Proverb

 

While wearing proper (clean, dry and insulated) clothing is crucial for working outdoors in cold weather, it’s not the only precaution hi-vis-winter-coverallyou need to take. There are many less obvious preventative measures you should take to ensure a safe work site in cold weather.

 

Bulky clothing tends to limit one’s mobility, causing falls and other accidents. Be aware of your surroundings and adjust your work style according to your extra clothing.

 

Dehydration is often overlooked; the importance of wearing protective clothing is always encouraged, but many forget the importance of drinking water. Wearing multiple layers of clothing causes workers to sweat, even in the cold temperatures. Pumping extra fluids is necessary, but also make sure they’re the right ones. Coffee may look like the best option – warm with a boost – but caffeine is a diuretic. Drink water, and lots of it.

 

Speaking of caffeine – other beverages, such as soda and energy drinks, shouldn’t be consumed in excess while working in cold weather. While tired employees run a greater risk of getting injured on the job site, these drinks make you jittery and cause you to crash once the caffeine wears off.

 

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) offers advice to employers and employees on taking necessary precautions to prevent and treat cold-related health problems:

  • Recognize the environmental and workplace conditions that may be dangerous.
  • Learn the signs and symptoms of cold-induced illnesses and injuries and what to do to help employees.
  • Encourage employees to wear proper clothing for cold, wet and windy conditions, including layers that can be adjusted to changing conditions.
  • Be sure that employees in extremely cold conditions take frequent, short breaks in warm and dry shelters to allow their bodies to warm up.
  • Try to schedule work for the warmest part of the day.
  • Avoid exhaustion or fatigue because energy is needed to keep muscles warm.
  • Use the buddy system: work in pairs so that one employee can recognize danger signs.
  • Eat warm, high-calorie foods such as hot pasta dishes.
  • Drink warm, sweet beverages (sugar water, sports-type drinks) and avoid drinks with caffeine (coffee, tea, sodas or hot chocolate).

The FOUR interview questions you HAVE to be ready for

February 21st, 2014   •   Employment Agency, interview, jobs, Staffing, unemployment, workers compensation   •   no comments   

i. “Could you tell me about yourself?” In just one minute, you need to make clear why you’d be a great person for the job.

 

ii. “What’s your greatest weakness”? Some employers are now using a variation of that: “What do you suck most at?” The informality makes you more likely to respond honestly.

 

iii. “Could you tell me about a problem you solved?” You need a one-minute story that showcases how your skills, ability or drive would be valuable in your target job.

 

iv. The question you fear most. Of course, it’s different for each applicant. Examples: “Why did you leave your previous employer?” “Why have you been unemployed so long?” Or it may be a technical question that would reveal that your skills for the job are marginal.

 

Practice these. Know what you’re going to say beforehand and you’ll be better prepared at some of these interview than your competition!

Gravity Always Wins

September 16th, 2013   •   jobs, Safety, Staffing, unemployment, workers compensation   •   no comments   

Ladder Safety

Gravity never forgets. As soon as you set foot on the ladder’s first rung and pull your body off the ground, gravity works to bring you back to earth. Therefore, it’s no surprise that ladder safety begins from the ground up.ladder-safety

Start with a good foundation

 

Proper ladder setup will help prevent slips and falls. Place the base on a firm, solid surface. Avoid slippery, wet or soft surfaces. If you must put the ladder on a soft surface, place a board under the ladder’s feet to provide firm footing. Make sure the top of the ladder has firm support as well.

 

Never lean a ladder against a window pane or other unstable surface. If you’re using a straight or extension ladder, the angle of the ladder is the next critical safety factor. A straight or extension ladder should be placed 1 foot away from the surface it rests against for every 4 feet of ladder height. For example, if the ladder is 4 feet high, the bottom of the ladder should be 1 foot away from the support surface.

 

If you use a ladder to access a roof or platform, make sure the ladder extends at least 3 feet over the roof or platform edge. Be sure to securely fasten straight and extension ladders to the upper support. If you have angled the ladder properly and still have doubts about its stability, have someone hold the ladder before climbing up.

 

If you’re using a step ladder, be sure to open it completely before you climb. If you have to use a step ladder near a doorway, lock or barricade the door and post signs so no one will open it and knock you off the ladder.

 

Climb with care

When you climb, always face the ladder and grip the rungs of the ladder to climb, not the side rails. Never get on or off a ladder from the side ladder_safety_falling_accidentunless it has been secured to prevent movement.

 

Never climb with equipment in your hands. Use your pockets, equipment belt, or a tool pouch and raise heavy objects with a hand line. If you forget something, always climb down the ladder to retrieve it yourself; don’t have someone toss it up to you. And never ask someone to climb up your ladder to give you supplies. It is dangerous to exceed the weight limits that a specific ladder can handle.

 

When you descend a ladder, practice the same safety rules. Face the ladder, keep your body square and hold on to the rungs. Lastly, step off at the bottom rung of the ladder. Never jump off of a ladder.

 

Think before you carry

Before you start to haul a ladder around, evaluate the area where you’ll be working. Ladders can be heavy and unwieldy. You can strike another person or object, or hit electrical power lines. Make the ladder as compact as possible before transporting it. Carry it horizontally while tilting it higher in front and lower in back. If the ladder is particularly long and heavy, get a coworker to help you carry it.

 

Follow the rules

  • Ladder safety may seem simple, but injuries occur every year. Below are some ladder safety dos and don’ts:ladder_safety
  • Use the right ladder for the job.
  • Inspect the ladder before and after a job.
  • Read all warning labels carefully and follow directions before you climb.
  • Clean the ladder after each use to prevent dirt buildup.
  • Wear clean, dry, slip-resistant shoes and use ladders with slip resistant feet.
  • Don’t stand any higher than the third rung from the top of the ladder.
  • Don’t lean too far or overreach. Reposition the ladder closer to the work instead.
  • Don’t use a ladder as a bridge or scaffold.
  • Don’t put a ladder on a box, barrel or other object to gain additional height.
  • Don’t use a damaged or unsafe ladder.

 

Experts also warn about ladder use in bad weather. Descend immediately if high winds, rain or other inclement weather begins. Wind force can blow you off the ladder. Rain can make the rungs and the ground slippery. Bitter cold can make metal ladders more brittle and can cause other structural damage. If you encounter bad weather while on a ladder, do not speed up to finish the job and risk injury. Wait to finish the job until conditions are once again safe.

 

Remember, don’t let gravity get you down. Practice ladder safety rules every time you climb to make your work easier, faster and safer.

Should I “Payroll” Employees Through a Staffing Agency?

What is “payrolling?” and how can it help my business?

Flexicrew works with many businesses who have chosen not to bring on an employee as a company hire, rather they “payroll” the employee through us. That means that Flexicrew is the employer of record and manages all payroll expenses such as taxes, unemployment, and worker’s compensation.payroll_question

Payrolling works well when there are large projects with a specified time frame. You know the employees that you like and trust and you want them on that project because you can trust that they will do the job right. But bringing them on permanent to your payroll isn’t an option. Flexicrew will hire these employees and send them to work for you in a seamless transaction. This situation usually costs a fraction of what a normal recruited staffing arrangement would cost.

Payrolling also allows your company to bring back the skills of experienced former employees or retirees and utilize the services of consultants, interns or specialized independent staff without legal worries.

Flexicrew’s payroll solutions can be your perfect alternative to downsizing. You can continue to utilize the valuable skills of your employees while they remain on our payroll.  We will provide your company’s payroll, record keeping, filing of insurance claims and government reporting- for one or one hundred employees for days, weeks, months or longer.

Find out more? Call Flexicrew 866.720.FLEX (3539)