Tag: job search

3 Steps to Help You Nail Your Next Interview

July 31st, 2018   •   interview   •   no comments   

Looking for a job can be very stressful and time consuming. Going to a job interview can be a nerve-racking process, even to the most confident person.

Meeting with job seekers on a daily basis, we are incredibly surprised to see how many people have not considered specific aspects of their daily life that would be beneficial in their job search. When looking for employment or looking to change your career path, there are specific steps that can be taken to assist with landing your dream job.

Step 1: Self Assess

Start with a self-assessment. The outcome of this assessment will help you better understand and nail down your interests, strengths, skill set and what specific needs you are trying to meet.

Take time to understand what you are genuinely interested in or passionate about. For example, if you are passionate about helping senior citizens or giving back to the community, it would be a great idea to look into non-profit organizations. Start to research companies in your area that are active in their local communities and giving back. If you enjoy being active and working with your hands, research warehouse and assembly positions in your community, which will allow you to be hands-on.

Don’t Forget!   It is also important to understand what your weaknesses and dislikes are. Every person has areas in life that need improvement and we all have things we do not like or enjoy. Understanding and being aware of these areas can help you in your career.

Self Assessment:

  1. What kind of work am I most comfortable with and willing to do?
  2. What am I passionate about or interested in?
  3. What area(s) do I need improvement in?
  4. What is it that I want to stay away from (ex: type of work, industry, environment, etc.)?
  5. What are the top 3 things that are important to me (ex: location, work schedule, pay, career advancement, etc.)?

Step 2: Research

Before stepping foot in an interview, research the company you are applying to work. Read and fully understand all aspects of the job description. Make sure that after the interview is scheduled, you have taken the research the company and its reputation. This can be done on company website and social media pages. Read company reviews. (There are numerous websites out there to assist with this research, such as Glassdoor.com) This is especially important when you are applying to a company you are not familiar with.

As with any research, be sure you use more than one source or website. The company’s social media pages will help you learn more about the work culture and work environment. Most companies post fun company pictures and community events to their social media sites. It is also a good idea to do a little research on the job title or industry if you are new to the field.

Step 3: Practice

Practice, practice, and practice! Do not skip this step!! This will build confidence and work out any kinks you might have or be feeling. I have found it is more beneficial to do a real practice interview with a family member or a trusted friend. Limit the practice to just you and the other person so you are more relaxed and focused. Make sure you ask them to have some questions prepared for the practice interview. Once the two of you are finished, ask for feedback on your performance. This will give you a good idea of how the interview went and what kind of questions you need to work on. Also ask for constructive feedback about your facial expressions, body language and anything else they noticed that a professional interviewer or hiring manager could view as negative. Practice, Practice, Practice!

Why a $14/hr employee really costs $20/hr

August 20th, 2012   •   Employment Agency   •   Comments Off on Why a $14/hr employee really costs $20/hr   

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — You probably cost your boss a lot more than you think you do.

For Jim Garland, who owns a corporate aircraft cleaning and support services company, a $14 per hour worker has a true cost of $19.63 per hour, or about 40% more than base pay. This so-called “loaded rate” includes fixed expenses — federal and state taxes, health insurance, workman’s compensation, uniforms, and paid time off — along with soft costs like the time spent training a new hire.

Washington’s lawmakers are throwing a lot of ammo at reducing the jobless rate, tax breaks for hiring the unemployed. But no matter what incentives the government offers, it’s hard to convince business owners to hire until they’re absolutely certain they need to. Employees are often the most expensive investment a business makes.

“Our entire existence revolves around two numbers: revenue and payroll,” Garland said of Sharp Details, in Dulles, Va., which he launched out of his car trunk in 1991. Payroll for 60 workers accounts for around 70% of his firm’s operating costs.

Garland outsources his entire human resource department. Joe Sherrier, director of human resources for Employment Enterprises — the company that manages Garland’s HR — said that as a general rule, business owners should to expect an employee to cost an additional 25% to 30% on top of base salary each year.

Breaking down the numbers: Hilda Kernc has been running a Lebanese food production company out of her home kitchen near Chicago for a bit more than a year. Her vegetarian cooking is so popular that she works as many as 20 hours a day keeping up with demand for her hummus and other Middle Eastern fare.

Kernc is applying for a Illinois state business license and is about to start renting out a commercial kitchen part-time. Previously distributed under the name Hilda’s Homemade Appetizers, Kernc’s snacks will now be branded “Deleez Appetizers,” a combination of the word “delicious” and the Arabic word that means the same.

Kernc thinks it might be time to bring on her first employee. “My husband is helping me, and we were thinking we need to hire somebody,” she said. “It will kill me if I am going to work like this.”

To prepare, Kernc began researching the costs.

State income taxes vary significantly, but federal taxes are standard: Social Security tax is 12.4% on the first $106,800 of earnings, and Medicare taxes run another 2.9% of all wages. The employer and employee each pay half. (The self-employed pay the full cost of both taxes themselves.)

Employers also have to pay a federal unemployment insurance tax of 6.2% on the first $7,000 of each employee’s wages. Illinois adds on a state unemployment tax that’s currently 3.9% for new companies on the first $12,520 of wages. (Existing companies have their rates adjusted up or down depending on how many former workers file unemployment claims.) Part of the state unemployment tax is deductible from the federal, but that still leaves employers on the hook for a tax bite.

“I can’t afford it,” Kernc concluded. “When I saw the price to hire somebody, at this point I can’t do it.”

But Kernc she also knows she can’t put it off indefinitely if demand stays high. “I can’t work 24 hours per day,” she said.

Hidden costs: The little perks that employees come to expect, from free coffee to daycare services to group life insurance, factor into the price tag of a new worker.

“All of a sudden, by hiring a new employee, adding up all the fringe benefits, it can be costly,” said Tom Ochsenschlager, a senior manager at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

Sam Meisler owns two animal hospitals and a vaccination clinic in Knoxville and Alcoa, Tenn. He’d like to hire another one or two full-time assistants to work in his My Pet’s Animal Hospital clinics. His company’s business is growing, but still, timing the staff expansion is tricky: “What we have to try to do is anticipate the recovery,” he said. “It is difficult to know when to hire.”

A new hire can actually decrease sales in the short term as they learn the job. As new assistants train on their computer system, Meisler expects occasional missed charges.

“You may even lose a client or two just from miscommunication, because of the veterinarian assistant not knowing how to talk to them on the phone,” he said. But on the flip side, extra administrative help gives the veterinarian more time to talk to each client and potentially sell additional services, such as grooming and dental cleaning.

0:00 /2:24Treat employees like family

A bad hiring decision can be a big hit to a company’s bottom line.

“The cost of hiring the wrong person becomes incrementally more expensive the shorter period of time they have been with you. The first 90 days are typically the most expensive to have them on board,” said Sherrier of Employment Enterprises. “If they stay, that is cost you can recover.”

The cost of losing an employee and hiring a replacement throws complicates the “loaded rate” calculation of what a worker costs each specific business.

Excerpted from CNN Money – By Catherine Clifford, First Published: March 26, 2010