Adversity in the Workplace How Are You Handling It?

When we think of adversity, we think of those situations and scenarios that pose challenges or create obstacles in our lives at work and at home. As much as we would like to avoid adversity, it is a constant and ever-present force.-women-in-trades-adversity

Thus, learning how to cope with and manage adversity becomes the key to our success. While there are many ways to approach adversity, this article highlights a few key ways to handle adversity as a means of overcoming obstacles and becoming more resilient.

Open-Minded

One of the keys to learning to cope with adversity can be found in how we approach the challenges we face. Our choice to face adversity with an open versus a closed mind can make or break us in times of crisis.

An open mindset embraces the idea that adversity is something we can learn from and thus approaches the challenge looking to learn and grow. A closed mindset does not see the opportunity in adversity and instead approaches it with hesitation and perhaps even objection. This mindset often will not gain anything from any adverse experience. Meanwhile, a person with an open mind will gain perspective, understanding, knowledge, and skills than can be useful to them in future situations (Maddock, 2013).

Determination

Determination is an attitude that decides an individual will overcome whatever the challenge or hardship being experienced. This attitude is essential to overcoming adversity because it is what energizes you when the challenges continue to bear down on you.

Essentially, determination serves as your ‘why’ when you’re tempted to give up. It is this attitude that will carry you through when the going gets tough and help you make it to a point where you can overcome adversity (Tyagi, 2019).

Goal setting

Setting goals when faced with adversity is a strong strategy for helping you to overcome the adversity you face. When faced with a challenge it can seem daunting and impossible at first. But breaking down the challenge and identifying the problem allows you to set actionable steps that will help you overcome the adversity. This helps the challenging go from massive and unmanageable, to easier to navigate and handle step-by-step (Tyagi, 2019).

Support

It may be tempting to isolate yourself when faced with a challenge but surrounding yourself with support can be a valuable asset. Support offers you the tools, information, resources, or skills you need to adequately assess and address the adversity you face. Support can be in the form of other individuals who can offer emotional and physical support, or even by the provision of resources you may need to address the issue at hand. This support can help you be better prepared to face the adversity and successfully navigate it (Essential Life Skills, n.d.).

Flexibility

A final key to learning how to successfully navigate adversity is learning to adapt and adjust. Most adversity is not predictable or expected. Learning how to pivot and change on the fly when faced with a challenge helps you to better cope and ultimately become more resilient. It’s this combination of flexibility and resilience that will help you better embrace and then overcome adversity.

Adversity is a normal part of every day, so the sooner we learn to embrace and deal with it, the better our lives will be. By confronting adversity with an open mind, a flexible and determined mindset, and by setting goals and having the right sets of supports in place, you’ll put yourself in the best position to not only cope with, but also conquer any adversity you face.

References:

Essential Life Skills. (n.d.). Tips for overcoming adversity. Essential Life Skills.net. https://www.essentiallifeskills.net/overcoming-adversity.html

Maddock, M. (2013, November 26). Three ways great leaders handle great adversity. Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikemaddock/2013/11/26/three-ways-great-leaders-handle-great-adversity/

Patel, D. (2018). 10 ways successful people push through adversity. Entrepreneur. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/319357

If You Believe You Are a Victim You Always Will Be

Every day brings a series of small and large challenges that workers sometimes win by overcoming them and sometimes lose by failing.  Most workers adapt to these challenges and understand that these challenges help them grow in their profession  even when they fail.  But if they believe they’re a victim of circumstances, they will find themselves being the victim even when they could have succeeded.

Feeling like a victim often starts early in life and maybe triggered by trauma.  As a child, some situations may be forced on you that are unfair, difficult, or harmful.  As an adult, a series of losses can lead to feeling like you have little control.resilience (2)

Lack of control is a hallmark of feeling like a victim. Victims believe they are powerless to change, improve, or overcome obstacles.

Victims feel helpless.  They often feel trapped by circumstances and believe they aren’t capable of overcoming their situation.  These feelings can cause a person to give up on themselves, their goals, and their performance.

Psychologists agree that believing you are a victim creates a cycle where your beliefs make you a victim over and over again.

According to Psychology Today, a leading group of psychologists and researchers, the beliefs a person has directly affect how they cope with challenges. These specialists have identified certain beliefs that lead to victim behavior.

  • Why try? I never win
  • Trust no one
  • I can’t
  • Everyone else is better than me
Why try? I never win

Everyone loses sometimes. Even a sports team with a perfect season rarely has more than one perfect season in a row.  In life, just like sports, you can lose sometimes and still win the overall prize in the end.  But if you let your losses overshadow your accomplishments, you can start to believe that your wins aren’t real or substantial.  When you see life as always loosing, it’s not worth trying for anything, and what you lose is the opportunity to win.

Trust no one

Victims don’t trust anyone. They believe that everyone else is against them and out to harm them.  Even innocent slights by others are perceived as intentional hurt.  While not everyone in life is willing to accept and help you, most people don’t spend all their time trying to hurt others.  Believing that you can’t trust anyone means that you will miss out on confiding and accepting help from people that could and would support you.  Without support, you remain a victim.

I Can’t

Feeling powerless robs you of control. If you believe that you don’t have control, you may start to feel like you are a victim.  “I can’t” becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Lack of commitment to change, refusal to learn and grow, and inability to accept mistakes as part of the path to success, all make it impossible to do something positive in your position.  It’s not that you can’t; it’s that you believe you can’t, so you don’t.

Everyone else is better than me

The powerless of believing you’re a victim elevates peers and co-workers above you. When you give others more control and power than you, you always remain a victim.  Believing everyone else is smarter, stronger, and more accomplished than you keep you from trying to improve and traps you as a victim.  Until you believe in yourself, you will always be a victim.

Work can be hard at times.  It’s possible to fail during the learning process and ultimately achieve goals.  But if you believe you are a victim of life, you always will be.  Letting others have power over you and giving up your control keeps you from the opportunities work offers to grow, change, and achieve.

Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need assistance recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in these challenging times, contact Flexicrew Today.

The Victim Mentality – Life Seems Unfair

Ongoing stress or a distressful situation can lead to the victim mentality. According to Healthline, a leading internet medical information provider, some people who experience ordeal may lose their sense of control over their lives and feel helpless when confronted with changes or challenges.  They feel trapped by circumstances that they think they have no control over and give up on being able to cope with or improve their situation.

People can be victims without developing the victim mentality.  When life seems unfair, or things don’t happen the way people want them to, most people adjust, adapt, and cope with their circumstances.  They make changes to improve themselves and their situation.

victim

People with the victim mentality are unable to make positive changes that help them control their circumstances. A person with the victim mentality always considers themselves a victim and behave as if they always will be the victim.  Even when they aren’t a victim, they refuse to see the difference between their perception of victimhood and reality.

Psychologists who study people’s reactions to disturbance believe the victim mentality is an acquired personality trait.  By thinking and acting as if they are always a victim, people’s personality becomes that of a victim no matter the circumstances.  The victim mentality includes thoughts and actions that keep people trapped as a victim.

Feeling Powerless

With the victim mentality, people feel powerless and unable to cope. They can’t find solutions for their problems because they don’t believe they have any power over themselves or their circumstances.  The victim mentality creates additional situations throughout life where people feel like victims because of the perception of powerlessness.

Feeling All Problems are Disasters

For people with the victim mentality, even small problems and challenges in life are perceived as significant disasters. They become upset and unreasonable when they feel the slightest thing is out of place or not up to their standards and expectations.  Because people with the victim mentality can’t find solutions, every problem they encounter feels like it’s unfixable and unending.

Thinking Others are Purposefully Trying to Cause Harm

Have you ever confronted someone about why they didn’t acknowledge you or do something to help you only to find that they were completely unaware of the situation? It’s easy to feel slighted when you think someone hasn’t responded to your needs, but the truth is they are often so wrapped up in their own lives; they aren’t fully aware of yours.

People with the victim mentality don’t see these types of situations as unintentional.  Instead, they believe other people are always out to hurt or harm them.  Because they don’t feel like they have control over their lives, they think that any lack of acknowledgment or help is a direct affront designed to hurt them.

Feeling Singled Out for Mistreatment

The victim mentality makes people feel that they are alone in their victimhood and receive worse treatment than others in the same situation. When a negative situation affects an entire group of people, they think that it’s harder and worse for them.  They may feel that they were included in the group only to make their lives worse, not because of circumstances but because they were singled out for mistreatment.

Being Unforgiving

When a situation is someone else’s fault, a person with the victim mentality refuses to forgive a sincerely offered apology or offers to make things right.  They may fear being hurt again by the same person.  They refuse to accept that others can make mistakes without malice or specific intent to harm them.

The victim mentality is a learned personality trait that results from not coping with and processing past distress. Because a person with the victim mentality can’t cope with challenges and problems, they feel they are always the victim of circumstances or other people’s intentional mistreatment.  The victim mentality makes people unable to take control of their lives and their responses to difficulty, keeping them always feeling like a victim.

Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need assistance recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in these challenging times, contact Flexicrew Today.

Your Workplace is Unfair – Deal with it

Often a firm does things that appear unfair. What if management is paid much more than the average employee.  That creates a sense of unfairness. When one worker is promoted over other co-workers who appear more worthy, it generates feelings of unfairness. If a project that a team worked on for a long time is eliminated without a reason given, it breeds a sense of unfairness.

That feeling that the work situation is unfair leads workers to question if they are truly a valued part of a company.  This leads to dis-engagement and lower productivity.fairness

Get Over it or Get Frustrated

If your firm wants to thrive and achieve any success, your workers must learn how to shift focus from the fact that life isn’t fair to the most important thing impacting their personal success – themselves. By focusing on who they are gives them the ability to channel their power into actionable progress and ultimate success.

Develop Self-Awareness

In order to tap into their abilities, they have to know who they are. Self-awareness is a system of reflection that allows us to develop a deep understanding of our inner thoughts, feelings, desires, motivations, behaviors, and actions. It is by implementing a regular process of checking in with themselves to understand how they are thinking and feeling, what is driving their desires and motivations, and what lies behind the actions that then gives your workforce the power to make changes within themselves.

When we are empowered with the necessary information about ourselves we can begin to identify patterns in our thinking and behaviors that are not serving us and make changes to those patterns in a meaningful way that moves us forward (Waters, 2013).

Belief in Their Abilities

A belief in what your employees are capable of is essential to being able to tap into the power of who they are. When your staff understands what it is able to do, they are more likely to position themselves in situations and take chances that will result in favorable outcomes.

Self-awareness can significantly support this process by making a worker aware of her strengths, thus giving her critical information about her abilities. It is this knowledge of personal strengths that can help overcome challenges and make strides towards their goals. Research supports this by showing that those who have a high level of confidence in their abilities have a greater ability to manage stress and are more resilient in the face of trauma (Cherry, 2020).

Find Their ‘Why’

When dealing with hardships, tapping into your ‘why’ or purpose for something is often the backbone needed to offer support when things seem unfair. Finding your ‘why’ serves as motivation in the midst of the discouragement and demotivation that dealing with unfairness work can bring. It is the purpose behind why pursue a specific goal or fighting for a certain cause that will energize individuals, keep them focused, and ultimately ensures they don’t stop until they reach their ultimate target (Cherry, 2020).

Set Goals For Themselves

Setting goals is another way to focus more on self than on circumstances in a manner that is going to produce actionable results. Setting goals takes the issue at hand, analyzes it, and breaks it down in a way that makes tackling it more feasible and manageable.

This allows efforts and energy to be better invested because the goal can be conquered bit by bit. Then, as success is achieved within each of the smaller established goals, confidence is increased, and motivation is gained towards completion of the larger goal. This continues to fuel the inner drive to work until the larger goal is met, ultimately driving progress (Cherry, 2020).

While there is no way to avoid the lack of fairness that sometimes exists, spending more energy looking at the power and abilities within, your employees will be able to tap into what they need to conquer challenges and overcome adversity. It is when they recognize their inner strength that they become truly powerful and elevate their performance.

References:

Cherry, K. (2020, January). Use these 10 tips to improve your resilience. Verywell Mind. https://www.verywellmind.com/ways-to-become-more-resilient-2795063

Waters, B. (2013, May 21). 10 traits of emotionally resilient people. Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/design-your-path/201305/10-traits-emotionally-resilient-people

Resilience: The Cornerstone of Your Personal Power

Do you remember when you were a child, and a bully called you a name or made fun of you? If you answered “I am rubber, and you are glue.  What you say bounces off of me and sticks to you,” your answer personified how resilience is the cornerstone of personal power.  Resilience, or the ability to bounce back from difficulties, is the basis for creating your own personal space, view, and power.

strength (3)

Your personal power depends on how resilient you are.  Life coaches teach that building resilience grows your personal power to cope with challenges and obstacles.  Psychologists have studied the link between resilience and personal power. They’ve determined that these key aspects of resilience help support personal power:

  • Focusing on the Present Supports Faith in Yourself
  • Learning from Your Failures Supports Self-Acceptance
  • Positive Thinking Supports Courage in Your Principles
  • Stress Management Supports Being Yourself
  • Changed Perspective Supports Choosing Your Response
Focusing on the Present Supports Faith in Yourself

Resilience requires focusing on the present. You can’t be resilient if you distract yourself from your goals by worrying about the past or future.  Learning to focus on the present supports your personal power by understanding and giving you faith in yourself.  Since you can’t change the past, you need to focus on what you can do now to improve your future.  Believing that you have the power to shape your future shows your personal control.

Learning from Your Failures Supports Self-Acceptance

Instead of blaming others, resilient people understand how they contributed to a failure. Resilient people are willing to examine their life and look for ways to overcome difficulty.  They use mistakes as opportunities to learn and grow.

Acknowledging your role in failure also allows you to own your part in success.  Self-acceptance means you have worked hard to understand yourself, including your strengths and weaknesses.  When you learn from your failures, you build the self-awareness that leads to self-acceptance.  Because you accept yourself, your personal power is built on your resilience to life’s obstacles.

Positive Thinking Supports Courage in Your Principles

Even when bad things happen, resilient people think positively by looking for ways to resolve and overcome obstacles. They don’t let others define their opinions or principles.  Because resilient people stay focused on positive outcomes, they aren’t easily swayed by the negative views of others.  When you think positively, your principles are based on knowing you can and will succeed.  Your belief in yourself creates personal power.

Stress Management Supports Being Yourself

Resilient people experience stressful situations in life. Instead of letting stress overwhelm them, they have learned to manage their lives to work through stress.  Resilient people understand that not everything that causes stress is horrible or never-ending.  Stress can be a motivator and teacher too.

Knowing how to process stress and work through it supports your personal power and being yourself.  Because a resilient person doesn’t allow other’s expectations of them to cause stress, they are free to be who they are.  In fact, being true to yourself often causes less stress once you learn to feel comfortable with your opinions and principles.  Being yourself builds your personal power and allows you to take the time needed to recharge, grow, and achieve.

Changed Perspective Supports Choosing Your Response

Personal power isn’t about control over others. Personal power is control over yourself.  Resilient people’s positive perspective of learning, growing, and living in the present supports the ability to choose the best response to any situation.  Choosing your personal response without interference from negative forces is the definition of personal power.

It’s impossible to build and maintain personal power without resilience. As the cornerstone of personal power, resilience provides the skills of focusing on the present, learning and growth, positive thinking, and stress management.

These skills change your perspective and support your personal power by helping you chose your response despite outside influences by building faith in yourself and your principles, self-acceptance, and the courage to be yourself and chose your best outcome.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

When IT Hits The Fan How Do You React?

You know how it is. Everything is happening at once, and then one more thing gets added or goes wrong. When IT hits the fan, how do your company personnel react? Do they respond negatively or positively to stress and difficulty?

obstacles

Psychologists believe people have a choice of how to react when things get tough. Your workers’ responses can be negative or positive and reflect how well they maintain control. Researchers have divided possible reactions to stressful situations to compare and contrast the differences of being distressed or being resilient.

• Overwhelming or Opportunity
• Blame or Responsibility
• Distract or Commit
• Allow or Act
• Impatience or Patience
• Pessimistic or Optimistic

Overwhelming or Opportunity

When things are tough, do your employees see their situation as overwhelming or as an opportunity? Being overwhelmed by change, challenges, and difficulties is a negative reaction. If things often seem overwhelming to your staff, they haven’t learned effective ways to cope with stress. Their negative response will keep them from overcoming a challenge and achieving more in their careers.

The positive reaction to when IT hits the fan is to see the challenge as an opportunity to learn and grow. People can’t avoid stress. Instead, they can use difficult situations to find new ways to solve problems. As your workers learn to see change as an opportunity, they learn and grow as a person.

Blame or Responsibility

Do any of your team think that everything wrong in their performance is someone else’s fault? Laying blame on other employees or supervisors for mistakes doesn’t negate your employees’ part in a difficult situation. Blaming others gives control away and keeps workers from overcoming obstacles.

Taking responsibility for their own actions allows workers to improve and better their situation. Control over their position and performance is basically theirs. Taking responsibility for their performance allows them to make needed changes to learn and grow.

Distract or Commit

Do your workers spend most of their time fantasizing about running away from their work and responsibilities? When IT hits the fan, distressed people often walk away from the challenge. They may even turn to alcohol and other drugs to distract themselves from their lack of control and their failures. When one of your team can’t face a difficult situation, they may quit their job or end a relationship, and distract themselves with something new. But if they don’t learn to deal with stress, their mistakes will follow them in their career and keep them from achieving new goals.

Resilient employees commit to their goals. They understand that while they may need to adjust their plans, reaching a goal requires commitment. If , on the contrary, they don’t get distracted by difficulties, they are showing signs of resilience.

Allow or Act

Allowing challenges like COVID-19 to keep you staff from company and personal goals is a negative reaction to difficulty. When they blame others, lose your control, and get distracted from finding solutions to work problems, they allow problems to stop themselves and maybe their team from succeeding.

If your staff are resilient, they have a goal and a plan. When they know they have control of themselves, they take action to improve their performance. Because you’re committed to helping your workforce learn and grow, you provide them the tools needed to make changes and overcome challenges.

Impatience or Patience

Challenges can create delays in reaching goals. If your workers are too impatient, they may give up their goals too quickly and never succeed. Even when IT hits the fan, you can’t insist on an immediate solution. Some goals require commitment and patience.

Patience takes practice. Are your employees willing to deny themselves an immediate distraction but instead commit to the work needed to achieve their goals? Taking a break can’t become permanent if they want to succeed.

Pessimistic or Optimistic

Ultimately, how your subordinates react to stress and success depends on if their reactions are pessimistic or optimistic. Pessimistic reactions limit ability to overcome challenges. Optimistic reactions give them the control and skills needed to succeed.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

3 Ways to Leave Your Comfort Zone and Build Resiliency

When one thinks about resilience it is our capacity to encounter difficulties and recover from those difficulties we encounter in a quick manner. Resilience is a skill that can be cultivated with time and patience. However, more than anything the development of resilience requires a willingness to step outside of your comfort zone.

Your comfort zone is the place where you feel safe and at ease, but if you feel comfortable you can almost always ensure that you’re experiencing no growth or development. Stepping out of your comfort zone sets the foundation for resilience to be cultivated by stretching you beyond your normal capacity and helping you learn to embrace the uncomfortable. Thus, you’re better able to cope and adapt to difficulties when they are encountered.

strength

How Abandoning Comfort Leads to Resilience

There are several ways that forsaking our comfort zones helps in our pursuit of resilience. The following outlines a few of those benefits.

1.Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable:

Stepping outside of your comfort zone most obviously helps expose you to the feeling of being uncomfortable. While initially, this might seem unbearable, over time the exposure to uncomfortable situations essentially builds endurance. The more often you’re uncomfortable, the more used to being uncomfortable you become.

Eventually, you realize you aren’t nearly as bothered by a particular situation or circumstance. This equips you to deal with that situation if you encounter it in the future but also trains you to deal with any scenario that might trigger the same feelings of discomfort. You then become more resilient because you aren’t as negatively or emotionally impacted by challenges and can better deal with them (Mook, n.d.).

2. Better Manage Stress:

Stepping outside of your comfort zone also helps with your management of stress. There is a certain level of stress experienced each time you are in a new, unfamiliar, or uncomfortable situation. When you are in these situations you learn skills and strategies that help you to cope and deal with stress.

Armed with that knowledge you are then better equipped to deal with future stress you experience (Buckley, 2019). This leads to resilience because you are less likely to have a purely emotional response that leads to breakdown and inactivity. Instead, you’ll have the skills to adapt and adjust as needed.

3. Conquer Fear

There is also a measure of fear attached to stepping out of your comfort zone- fear of the unknown. When you are uncertain about what to expect or what you may encounter the temptation to remain stationary because of fear is strong.

However, the intentional decision to step outside of your comfort zone forces you to face your fear. In doing so you demonstrate to yourself that challenges are more manageable than you may have thought or that you’re more capable than you may have believed. This leads to resilience by empowering you to see that you are competent and capable. Thus, when faced with future hardships you’re able to view them from an optimistic lens, embrace them, and work to find solutions or navigate through them.

The journey towards resilience is just that, a journey, but it starts with a first step in the right direction- stepping outside of our comfort zone. The initial discomfort of those first steps will yield a big return in the pursuit of resilience.

By learning to embrace discomfort, manage stress, and conquer our fear we will become better equipped to truly rise above those challenges we encounter in our lives, recover from them, and be wiser and better people as a result.

References:

Buckley, F. (2019, 12). Building resilience for those stuck in their comfort zone. Breaking News. https://www.breakingnews.ie/business/building-resilience-for-those-stuck-in-their-comfort-zone-971435.html

Mook, M. (n.d.). Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone to build resilience. Pro-Development. https://www.pro-development.co.uk/pushing-yourself-out-of-your-comfort-zone-to-build-resilience/

 

Say Thank You to Past Challenges: Gifts That Build Resilience

How do resilient workers get to become resilient in the first place? What makes someone adjust and recover from job stresses?  Resilient workers owe their resilience to past challenges.  How a person copes with challenges builds their resilience for future ones.  Every resilient employee should say thank you to their past challenges because they made the person they are today.

Each time an employee faces a challenge on-the-job, she has the opportunity to learn, grow, and change.  Psychologists believe that when you successfully navigate a challenge, you build resilience to face another challenge later.  Even failure can help build resilience if a lesson is learned from it.

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Here are the gifts that past challenges offer to help your personnel build resistance:

  • Control
  • Plans
  • Goals
  • Commitment
  • Action
  • Past Success
  • Support System
  • Humor
  • Patience
Control

Past challenges teach valuable lessons about control.  To succeed, one must learn the difference between what an individual can control and what she can’t.  When you understand that you control your actions and reactions, you are building the foundation of resilience.  Knowing what you can control helps you focus on how to cope with challenges throughout their career and, in fact, life.

Plans

Reaching a goal requires planning.  Your team may need to organize their time, workspace, or add to their certifications or education.  When faced with a challenge, having a plan allows them to work toward their goals, regardless of distractions.  Having a plan helps make your team resilient when new challenges appear.

Goals

People who aren’t resilient allow life to dictate their circumstances.  They don’t create goals because they don’t believe they can achieve them.  They let challenges overwhelm them instead of having a clear idea of what they want.  Goals provide a sense of purpose and a reason to be resilient.

Commitment

Resilience is staying committed to a goal and finding ways to cope with challenges. When you learn to commit to goals, you become more resilient to other challenges they may face.  People who aren’t resilient give up when presented with a challenge instead of working toward a resolution.

Action

Overcoming challenges requires action. Each challenge in life pushes you to work to overcome it.  As they take action, they learn new and better ways to cope with challenges.  Your experience and knowledge make you more resilient with each new challenge they face.

Past Successes

There’s nothing better than reaching a goal that they’ve worked hard to achieve.  Their past successes build their self-esteem and confidence, making your staff ready and more resilient for the next challenge. Their past successes also provide a framework for how to cope with other challenges.  That helps them to be more resilient, even if the new challenge is unexpected or difficult like COVID-19 has been for all of us.

Support System

To overcome a challenge, an individual team member often needs a strong support system. If the challenge is personal, she may need the support of friends and family.  If the challenge is professional, she may need the help of a mentor or coworkers.  Building a reliable support system provides endless ‘gifts’ for future challenges.  Employees know who to trust and rely on to help them.  That succeeds in making workers more resilient, and helping them cope.

Humor

Many people find that humor helps them cope.  Especially with thorny problems or situations at work.  Instead of struggling with a challenge, they use humor to lessen stress and accept when they fail.  Having a good sense of humor provides an outlet for stress and disappointment, making workers more resilient when faced with another challenge.

Patience

Not every goal is simple to achieve.  Many goals take time, hard work, and patience.  Being able to accept that a reward isn’t immediate helps make workers resilient in the face of delays and disappointments and potential loss of employment.  Patience helps them cope and stay committed to the company’s goals even when they face obstacles.

Past challenges, however painful at the time, truly are gifts that help your workforce build resilience. Coping with past challenges provides a wealth of skills that are needed for resilience.  They owe their past challenges a thank you!

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

Managing Work Obstacles: The Resilience Mindset

In order to move from a place of simply getting by in the office to a place of thriving, resilience is a necessary trait. At a basic level resilience is our ability to work through tough assignments and bounce back from situations like missed deadlines on tasks and difficulties encountered like Coronavirus and the toll it’s taking on business and personal lives.

At a more complex level, the resilience mindset embraces the idea that true resilience is the ability to navigate work, adapt to change, learn through adversity, and understand feelings and emotional responses to difficult situations. In order for this to be achieved, there must be a high level of personal awareness and insight which leads to a deep understanding of self (O’Keeffe, 2019).

Resilience mindset

Resilience is an asset sought-after employees must embrace when it comes to managing adversity because it helps them to overcome it. Rather than crumbling under the pressure and weight of every challenge encountered, they become able to assess the challenge, learn and grow from it as they go through it, and then move forward with the lessons they’ve been taught (O’Keeffe, 2019). It is resilience that empowers workers to continue moving forward, learning, and growing, and building on the things they are learning from setbacks or failure to deliver expected results at work.

Keys to Developing a Resilient Mindset

In order to develop a resilient mindset, there are several qualities and practices that can be implemented. The following outlines several of those qualities and practices and their relation to the development of resilience.

Optimism

A strong trait of those with a resilient mindset is an intentional optimistic outlook when approaching challenging situations. The way a worker views a situation shapes the approach they take when dealing with the situation.

A more positive outlook tends to yield a more positive outcome because your staff sees opportunities as opposed to obstacles, and thus enthusiastically address issues versus hesitantly avoiding them (Mind Tools, 2020). Leading psychologist Martin Seligman explains that optimism is linked to resilience in that it helps employees’ views on permanence, pervasiveness, and the personalization of hardships.

Optimism leads your staff to see bad events as temporary rather than permanent, to prevent setbacks from impacting unrelated areas of their jobs, and to not blame themselves when bad events occur. Thus, workers can better pivot and recover from challenges they experience (Mind Tools, 2020).

Focus on What You Can Control

Learning to focus on what is within their control and releasing those things that are not is an important part of developing resilience. It is only those things within their control that gives staff the ability to influence, thus exerting physical or mental and emotional energy on things outside of their control is mismanagement of time and energy (Miller, 2020). Employees who spend their time and energy on what they can control become more resilient because they put their efforts towards those things that will have the greatest impact and produce the most results. This allows them to actually be effective and respond better to situations that arise (Mind Tools, 2020).

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is critical to the development of a resilient mindset. Self-awareness helps staff to assess areas of themselves and their lives where it’s necessary to improve and areas that is producing favorable results.

Self-awareness offers staff key insights about themselves that can be used to change, adapt, grow, or alter themselves, their workplace environment, or other elements. This ultimately contributes to resilience by helping keep patterns and habits that help adapt and respond to challenges while becoming aware of and purging patterns and habits that work against their goals and targets.

If your staff can cultivate a resilient mindset their ability to cope with job-related challenges will be strengthened. Rather than being overcome by negative situations and circumstances they will become empowered to overcome those situations and circumstances. By implementing the practices mentioned and others like it, they’ll be one step closer to better navigating the difficulties they encounter.

References:

Miller, K. (2020). 5+ ways to develop a growth mindset using grit and resilience. PositivePsychology.com. https://positivepsychology.com/5-ways-develop-grit-resilience/

Mind Tools. (2020). Developing resilience: Overcoming and growing from setbacks. https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm

O’Keeffe, S. (2019, March 11). 4 aspects of a resilient mindset. https://thriveglobal.com/stories/4-aspects-of-a-resilient-mindset/

How to Plan and Build a Resilient Work Culture

In some companies employees are eager to come to their workplace and get right to work, while in other firms workers are tentative would prefer to remain at home. The difference is because workers are enthusiastic if the company has a deliberate work culture; while others have a default work culture where the workforce is less engaged.

In some companies the work culture depends on the mood of the Management, creating uncertainty for the workers. In other companies the Human Resources (HR) and the Management team have deliberately taken the effort to create a work culture based on their beliefs, value system, implementing and sustaining it using well-understood processes and systems, so that employees ‘get it’ and enjoy working.

Management Role

Peter Drucker, one of the most well known management consultants, has confirmed that the top management of an organization determines the culture to a great extent. If top Management has vision and integrity, the organization will also be a great place and the workforce will understand their direction. In contrast, if the leaders are dishonest and incompetent, the decay of the organization will start from the top. Many people are trained to think that a business should focus on its customers. While delivering high quality services or products is the aim of every business, it is also relevant to use the right methods to achieve these goals.

Ultimately everything in a business depends on the Management who is supported by the Human Resources team. Since all employees are accountable to the top leaders, the leaders influence the work culture for the company, which also affects employee behavior. Developing effective processes which make the workforce financially and emotionally secure, improves the work culture so that employees perform better

Making Teams Resilient

Research indicates that financial and emotional security is very important for the employees. They also want someone to listen to them, so employees know that their opinion is valued. Only if employees are respected and valued in the company, will they be emotionally secure. Like in the case of individuals, a deliberate effort is required to make the team resilient. This method includes improving the ability of team members to handle adversity, challenges and stress. This makes it easier to achieve their goals at present and also better face challenges in future. Unless the work culture is deliberately designed, team members will feel insecure, stressed and may worry about getting help if they make errors

It is recommended that every employer should define the desired culture at the workplace using a culture manual. So, if for example timeliness is the culture that should permeate the work environment though the timing is assumed in every organization, if a meeting is, it is important to specify when the meeting will start. And for those invitees to come on time otherwise the culture becomes unpredictable. The culture manual should specify the workplace timings. Workers should know what the rules at the workplace are, which they and other employees will also follow.

Dealing with Adversity

Every organization is likely to face adverse business conditions at some stage like we all are facing COVID-19. It is important to prioritize and clearly define the processes to handle the problems and resolve them. One of the leading experts in Quality Control, W.Edwards Deming believed that having a system which is reliable, predictable and is implemented consistently can lead to success in 94% of the cases.

If a team, group or the entire company wishes to be resilient, they should have a backup plan, which allows them to recover quickly and respond if the original plans don’t succeed. Without suitable processes, priorities, the work culture fails, limiting the success of both employees and the company.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.