What Are The Benefits Of Short-Burst Productivity

Although it may sound strange, most human productivity experts recommend that workers employ short-burst productivity methods, as they have found numerous benefits of short-burst productivity when humans work in more intense, focused periods.

Benefits off Short-Burst Productivity

It Minimizes Distractions

At this point in time, when every employee has a personal cell phone and access to the internet, it’s extremely easy for them to get distracted from their work. This is because you never know when your phone rings if it’s something which can wait, and you have no specified time of when you should answer it, so there’s no reason not to answer it right then.

Dedicate yourself to working for 25 minutes in the short burst method.  You’re less likely to engage in most distractions because you’ll have a specified break in a few minutes in which to deal with these distractions.

It Keeps You Focused

When you work for long periods of time, it’s not uncommon for workers’ minds to wander.  This is just how the human mind is. Short productivity bursts stops this wandering in its tracks because focusing for 25 minutes is much easier than telling your mind to stay engaged for four or even eight hours.

And when you’re focused, you’ll produce more work than when you keep thinking about what you will do after work every five minutes.

Not only that but focusing for 25 minutes on work in front of you stops multitasking, which many people engage in even if they don’t notice.

It Challenges Your Brain

Another of the benefits of short-burst productivity is it challenges your brain.  One of the main tactics of this approach to work is to pit your mind against a timer.  Place the timer where you can observe it.  This allows you to see the remaining time countdown. Whether you realize it or not, this puts some pressure on your brain.  That helps your mind see the work as a challenge that it needs to complete before the time runs out.

This is a stark difference from sitting at your desk all day knowing you have a deadline.  But it’s hours or even days away, so you don’t worry about it. The timer gives you a sense of urgency, which in turn gives you a sense of motivation.

Wrapping Up – Benefits of Short-Burst Productivity

Overall, there are numerous benefits to short-burst productivity and changing your work style. They are fewer distractions, increased focus, and more of a challenge for your mind. So, give short-burst productivity a day and see what all you can accomplish in your performance.

What Is Short-Burst Productivity and its ROI

It can sometimes be difficult to stay on task and productive for extended periods. And this is why many experts recommend changing the style of your work to short-burst productivity with multiple dedicated mini tasks in short, defined times.

Short-Burst productivity improves workers' performance in a compressed time

Work Smarter Not Harder

Although you may think that if you work for an eight-hour day, you will accomplish things more quickly, according to consultant Francesco Cirillo, this is not true. This is because, during a long work period, numerous distractions constantly pull you away from your work,.  You find it difficult to ignore distractions such as emails and phone calls.

Also,  the pressure on your mind to perform over a long period can quickly transform into frustration. And this frustration leads to you accomplishing less than you think. This is why it is recommended to break your workday down into shorter chunks of time.

How It Works

Short-burst productivity focuses on remaining hyper-focused for a short, specified period. And during this time, you mustn’t acknowledge any distractions.

  1. First, make a list of everything you need to get done, then you set your timer. Cirillo recommends using a physical timer and setting it for 25 minutes to start.
  2. When the timer goes off, take a 3-5-minute break to address anything you may need to, then set the timer again and do another 25 minutes.
  3. Repeat this three times until you have worked for just over 100 minutes.
  4. Then take an extended twenty-minute break before starting the cycle over again.

You’ll likely be surprised when you look back over what you accomplished.

Why A Physical Timer?

You should use a physical timer, such as a kitchen timer, and not the ‘glance at the clock’ method because having something count down that you can physically see is part of the effect.

This helps you feel a sense of urgency in your work, even if the work you are completing isn’t urgent. And when the timer goes off, you will likely feel a sense of mild accomplishment of what you’ve completed.

In Summary

The concept of short-burst productivity may not sound like it is an efficient way to work, but experts who have worked with the human mind for years swear by it. So next time you have a large project to tackle, consider grabbing your kitchen timer and try breaking it down into easier pieces to handle.

 

4 Simple Ways to Take Charge of Your Work Habits

There’s an old quote that perfectly shows why you need to take charge of your habits – be they work habits or personal. “The chains of habit are too light to be felt until they are too heavy to be broken.” by Warren Buffet. If you don’t take charge of your habits, even ones that seem harmless, they will easily control you.

While work habits are easily formed and followed through, especially once your brain recognizes them as habits, you can still change them. Always remember that you are in control, not your habits.  So, you can change bad patterns , even those you’ve had for a long time.

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Habit expert and writer of the book ‘Atomic Habits’ James Clear has four rules for forming habits that can help you take charge of them. Whether the habits are good or bad, you can still use these rules to gain some measure of control. These rules, according to Atomic Habits, are:

1. Make it obvious

2. Make it attractive

3. Make it easy

4. Make it satisfying

Let’s go over them one-by-one.

1.Make it Obvious

To take charge of your habits, you need to make them obvious. For example, let’s say you want to start running. If your running shoes and gear are in the closet, then that habit isn’t apparent. Instead of sifting through your wardrobe for your shoes, your brain will just want to stay in bed.

So, you can put your running shoes by the door and make sure that they are the first thing you see in the morning. Then you’ll be reminded that you should run today. To break bad habits, you want to hide things away – make them less obvious.

2. Make it Attractive

With habits, most people focus on the long-term goals. You might say, “I will go for a run to get my beach body in ten weeks.” While that goal is noble, it does nothing when running in the cold and feeling miserable.

So, make your routines attractive and give yourself a reward or incentive to get it done. Maybe run with a friend or have your running trail pass by a place where you can have breakfast or see the city’s sunrise. For bad patterns , add extra steps or make continuing the tendency very unattractive.

3. Make it Easy

Remember, the brain always takes on the path of least resistance. If that path happens to lead to your habit, then more power to you. It might seem counter-intuitive, but instead of telling yourself. I will run a mile today; say that you will only run a block.

Having smaller micro-habits will make everything easier and will help you do them. Most people go too big, get discouraged, and then get burned out. But running a block, reading one page of a book, or doing one push-up is something that takes no time at all. Plus, if you achieve a  small one, why not do another and another?

For bad habits, add more resistance to them and make them harder to achieve.

4. Make it Satisfying

Reward yourself along the journey toward achieving your desired habits, and you’ll keep doing them. Maybe if you go running for thirty days, give yourself some type of reward. Have a good meal, watch a movie, do something you wouldn’t normally do, and also reflect on how running has made you a better person than you were 30 days ago.

For bad habits, remove the satisfaction from them, and you won’t see them as a reward.

You Are In Control of Your Work Habits

Remember that every habit comes from your own brain, and you are the one in control. If you want to make or break a habit, you are the only one who can do so. Follow these four steps, and you’ll find that it gets easier and easier to take charge and make your work habits work for you.

Mental Trauma of COVID and 6 Steps to Protect Employees

According to the Washington Post, “Nearly half of Americans report the coronavirus crisis is harming their mental health, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll. A federal emergency hotline for people in emotional distress registered a more than 1,000 percent increase in one month compared with the same time in 2019. In one month, roughly 20,000 people texted that hotline, run by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.”

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It’s terrifying to realize a pandemic such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) remains around the world. The different stages of a pandemic can provide panic and anxiety. No one knows just how widespread or deadly the novel coronavirus will end up being.  But being proactive about your workers’ mental health can help to keep their mind and body healthy.

In the following information, we have detailed suggestions on ways to protect yourself and your staff.

One of the first steps you can take is to recognize the things you can control. Practicing self-care such as seeking professional help from a licensed mental health professional and finding ways to manage stress. Your means of coping with stress and anxiety goes a long way in managing your mental health. Here are some ways to help you ease anxiety surrounding COVID-19.

1. Help Employees Practice Good Self-Care

Eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, and engaging in some form of exercise may seem obvious since we were taught them as early as grammar school.  But they are always good steps to helping your personnel stay as physically and psychologically healthy as possible during stressful times.

Good self-care also keeps your workers’ immune system healthy which means eating well, sleeping well, and managing stress.

2. Peace of Mind

Practice recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control, The World Health Organization, and other excerpts to curtail transmission of COVID-19 still include wearing a mask when going out, keeping at least 6-foot distance from others, and washing your hands regularly.

If you live in an area where the COVID-19 infection rates are very high, try to stay home as much possible, avoid crowds, and when do you go out practice the methods of safety detailed above. There are always steps you can take to decrease risk. Be aware that steps like washing your hands, wearing a mask, and keeping social distance remind you to focus on the things you can control.

Knowing you are doing everything possible to keep safe gives a lot of peace of mind.

3. Professional Help

If your staff’s  mental health is being affected by the stress and anxiety of COVID-19 then they may need to seek support.

Workers experiencing burnout should reach out to their Human Resources department. Frequently supervisors are not familiar with what benefits are offered, particularly relating to mental health. But HR personnel are more aware of what’s available from a company and will be able to help obtain those resources.

It might mean to seek the help of a mental health professional. A licensed mental health professional can help you manage stress while helping you to make the best personal decisions. The good news is thousands of therapists are now using remote methods, such as video conferencing, telemedicine so you can talk to someone right from home or your workplace (in private, of course).

High anxiety and stress can cause some workers to adopt unproven or unsafe prevention methods. Some of these methods can be harmful to you and others. It’s important to make sure any actions you take are truly beneficial.

“Although the world is full of suffering, it is full also of the overcoming of it.” – Helen Keller

4. Develop an Action Plan

Be aware that increased depression and anxiety is probably going to occur with your workers. So, plan for it. If they start to feel sad, overwhelmed, frustrated or anxious – talk with them, have them write about it, just get it out, do not let it fester inside them. Be prepared and make a plan. Who to talk to?.

Another important issue is that employees often adopt the coping strategies they observe in their bosses.  Supervisors who show anxiety and stress during a pandemic may end up projecting the anxiety right along to their subordinates.

5. Read News From Trustworthy Sources And Limit Media Consumption

Avoid media outlets that provoke stress or focus on issues that can’t be controlled. Instead, turn to sources that give reliable information. One reputable source is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They provide helpful tips to keep you and your co-workers safe during these unprecedented times.

Watching media stories that talk about how fast an illness is spreading, or the death toll will increase stress and anxiety. Limit your media consumption to a certain time frame or a certain number of stories.

It is helpful to stay informed, but you shouldn’t allow yourself to be bombarded with anxiety-provoking news all day. The most important actions are to keep you and your workers properly informed, calm, and healthy as possible.

6. The Bottom Line

Remember one thing.  People are strong.  We will get through this.  It is not forever and most important do not project what has not yet happened. If you are healthy and safe, don’t worry about what might happen.  Get vaccinated when it is your turn.  Stay in the moment and enjoy the present.

Need Help Finding Top Performers for your Team?

Call Flexicrew. As one of  the Southeast’s top staffing agencies, we have 14 years experience serving employers – and helping them find truly exceptional people. Contact us today to learn more!

Stress Kills: Is Yours Out of Control?

On the job or outside work stress is arguably one of the most silent killers on the planet, largely because people don’t realize something is going wrong, or they refuse to act on it.workplace stressors

But why does stress contribute to so many aspects of ill health, ultimately leading to death?

It is because often it is untraceable. You may not realize you are suffering from stress overload.

Interested to know if your stress is rapidly becoming out of control? Look for the following tell-tale signs:

Unexplained Aches And Pain About The Body

A little pain here and there is normal, and should be nothing to get worried over; but it can spell a worrying trend when it occurs too often. And this is the case with being overly stressed at work or even worse – all the time.

Muscular pains most commonly occur around the back, neck or shoulder areas, and may be attributed to poor sleep patterns, although it is not always the case. Medications to treat the pain may only yield temporary relief, and you should not rely upon them as a long-term solution.

Frequent Colds And Infections

One thing associated with high stress levels is the negative effect on immunity. Cortisol suppresses the immune system and leaves the body wide open to infection. This is especially troublesome during this pandemic, and necessitates that extra precautions be taken (such as increasing anti-oxidant food consumption).

Poor Sleep Patterns

Insomnia is usually one of the first signs to appear when you are over-stressed, as cortisol does not work by itself. In fact, it recruits the neurochemicals adrenalin and noradrenalin, which enhance awareness, and energy levels.

This is an important function in the mornings when you need that “get up and go” boost to get to work, but not at night when you should be unwinding. Use of heavy stimulant based supplements (such as caffeine) too late at night will cause this to occur.

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure involves multiple pathways all experiencing dysfunction for its development, with cortisol happy to oblige. High blood pressure in this case is precipitated by increased retention of water (which increases blood volume), faster heart rate, and blood vessel constriction. All these factors increase blood pressure, so you need to take care to manage cortisol and stress levels.

Frequent Outbursts or Mood Swings

It can be hard to maintain a level head when stress levels are high, causing you to lash out to anyone or simple issues at work that seemingly irritates you. This is not normal behavior, especially if you are generally very level headed. If it does occur, it may be best to reduce work load, and spend more time with family and loved ones in an attempt to relax.

Depression Or Feelings Of Inadequacy

Stress can seriously affect your emotional well-being, especially since it can tear apart relationships with associates. You are likely to be irritable, picking fights, or feel pressured to perform. This can amount to depression, anxiety or feelings of disappointment. Depression is sometimes difficult to diagnose, especially if your organization does not provide a strong support system.

Conclusion

If you find yourself experiencing one or more of the symptoms above with increasing frequency, it is time to take a step back from the burden you have placed on your shoulder. Sometimes, a short vacation, weekend getaway or just a simple trek in the outdoors can do wonders for your wellbeing.

 

 

Dealing with Anxiety in Today’s Turbulent Business

Okay, so besides the normal day-to-day hustle and immense stress of the work environment in the modern world, we have a pandemic to contend with and we don’t know for how long.

Unfortunately, dealing with anxiety has become somewhat of a normal part of work life for many individuals today. Although this problem is not necessarily a new phenomenon, there are certain aspects of modern times that have served to exacerbate the issue.

anxiety

Due to our being so connected through the internet, social media and other forms of media, workers today are not only exposed to the issues in their immediate work environment. Instead, we are shown all of the bad things taking place across the entire nation. Furthermore, we are expected to juggle so many more responsibilities at one time, all while being as productive as possible.

Although anxiety certainly varies in intensity and frequency from employee to employee, there are a few ways to deal with the problem that are beneficial for anyone experiencing this issue.

 

This article intends to discuss a few of these techniques in order to alleviate some of your anxiety, hopefully improving your performance and overall quality of life.

Live in the Moment

Although it may seem obvious when stated, the only point in time in which you will EVER exist is right now. Ironically, most of us dedicate the bulk of our mental energy into the past or future. Anxiety is great at causing us to replay past mistakes in our head and constantly worry about things that have yet to occur.

A big part of dealing with anxiety is to live in the moment. This means focusing all of your physical and mental energy on what is going on right now. Not only does this simplify things for you, it also allows you to get the most performance out of your limited time.

Trying to deal with your entire past and future on a constant basis makes it virtually impossible to appreciate what is right in front of you.

Control What You Can Control

The truth is, many of the issues causing anxiety in your life are beyond your control. This includes global and community issues as well as problems in your personal life.

What you need to realize is that the weight of the world is NOT on your shoulders, even though it can certainly seem like it at times. Anxiety tells you that you should be worried about solving problems that are way out of your hands.

In reality, focusing on-the-job issues that you actually have the ability work on and to resolve is a much healthier response to a problem-filled situation.

It’s Okay to Not Feel Okay

Another side effect of anxiety is a feeling of isolation. People experiencing anxiety on a routine basis tend to feel like they are the only employees dealing with this issue.

Because of this perspective, we often feel like everyone else is much happier than we are, like we won’t be accepted by associates if anyone else knew the extent of our anxiety. It is so important to realize that this is far from the truth.

Everyone on your team is experiencing some degree of anxiety or mental hang up. You are far from alone. Don’t feel like you have to perform your tasks acting as if everything is okay when it isn’t.

Get Help if You Need it

Finally, if your anxiety is something you are having trouble dealing with on your own, then don’t! There is absolutely nothing wrong with reaching out to HR and even seeking professional help for this issue. Ironically, our society welcomes getting help for even minor physical ailments but acts as if doing the same for a serious mental issue is taboo.

Consider this, if you had the flu, you would most certainly seek the appropriate doctor to take care of it. Why would you not seek a doctor that is medically trained in alleviating mental health issues if you are dealing with anxiety?

There is help out there, get it if you need it!

Resilience: The Cornerstone of Your Personal Power

Do you remember when you were a child, and a bully called you a name or made fun of you? If you answered “I am rubber, and you are glue.  What you say bounces off of me and sticks to you,” your answer personified how resilience is the cornerstone of personal power.  Resilience, or the ability to bounce back from difficulties, is the basis for creating your own personal space, view, and power.

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Your personal power depends on how resilient you are.  Life coaches teach that building resilience grows your personal power to cope with challenges and obstacles.  Psychologists have studied the link between resilience and personal power. They’ve determined that these key aspects of resilience help support personal power:

  • Focusing on the Present Supports Faith in Yourself
  • Learning from Your Failures Supports Self-Acceptance
  • Positive Thinking Supports Courage in Your Principles
  • Stress Management Supports Being Yourself
  • Changed Perspective Supports Choosing Your Response
Focusing on the Present Supports Faith in Yourself

Resilience requires focusing on the present. You can’t be resilient if you distract yourself from your goals by worrying about the past or future.  Learning to focus on the present supports your personal power by understanding and giving you faith in yourself.  Since you can’t change the past, you need to focus on what you can do now to improve your future.  Believing that you have the power to shape your future shows your personal control.

Learning from Your Failures Supports Self-Acceptance

Instead of blaming others, resilient people understand how they contributed to a failure. Resilient people are willing to examine their life and look for ways to overcome difficulty.  They use mistakes as opportunities to learn and grow.

Acknowledging your role in failure also allows you to own your part in success.  Self-acceptance means you have worked hard to understand yourself, including your strengths and weaknesses.  When you learn from your failures, you build the self-awareness that leads to self-acceptance.  Because you accept yourself, your personal power is built on your resilience to life’s obstacles.

Positive Thinking Supports Courage in Your Principles

Even when bad things happen, resilient people think positively by looking for ways to resolve and overcome obstacles. They don’t let others define their opinions or principles.  Because resilient people stay focused on positive outcomes, they aren’t easily swayed by the negative views of others.  When you think positively, your principles are based on knowing you can and will succeed.  Your belief in yourself creates personal power.

Stress Management Supports Being Yourself

Resilient people experience stressful situations in life. Instead of letting stress overwhelm them, they have learned to manage their lives to work through stress.  Resilient people understand that not everything that causes stress is horrible or never-ending.  Stress can be a motivator and teacher too.

Knowing how to process stress and work through it supports your personal power and being yourself.  Because a resilient person doesn’t allow other’s expectations of them to cause stress, they are free to be who they are.  In fact, being true to yourself often causes less stress once you learn to feel comfortable with your opinions and principles.  Being yourself builds your personal power and allows you to take the time needed to recharge, grow, and achieve.

Changed Perspective Supports Choosing Your Response

Personal power isn’t about control over others. Personal power is control over yourself.  Resilient people’s positive perspective of learning, growing, and living in the present supports the ability to choose the best response to any situation.  Choosing your personal response without interference from negative forces is the definition of personal power.

It’s impossible to build and maintain personal power without resilience. As the cornerstone of personal power, resilience provides the skills of focusing on the present, learning and growth, positive thinking, and stress management.

These skills change your perspective and support your personal power by helping you chose your response despite outside influences by building faith in yourself and your principles, self-acceptance, and the courage to be yourself and chose your best outcome.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

When IT Hits The Fan How Do You React?

You know how it is. Everything is happening at once, and then one more thing gets added or goes wrong. When IT hits the fan, how do your company personnel react? Do they respond negatively or positively to stress and difficulty?

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Psychologists believe people have a choice of how to react when things get tough. Your workers’ responses can be negative or positive and reflect how well they maintain control. Researchers have divided possible reactions to stressful situations to compare and contrast the differences of being distressed or being resilient.

• Overwhelming or Opportunity
• Blame or Responsibility
• Distract or Commit
• Allow or Act
• Impatience or Patience
• Pessimistic or Optimistic

Overwhelming or Opportunity

When things are tough, do your employees see their situation as overwhelming or as an opportunity? Being overwhelmed by change, challenges, and difficulties is a negative reaction. If things often seem overwhelming to your staff, they haven’t learned effective ways to cope with stress. Their negative response will keep them from overcoming a challenge and achieving more in their careers.

The positive reaction to when IT hits the fan is to see the challenge as an opportunity to learn and grow. People can’t avoid stress. Instead, they can use difficult situations to find new ways to solve problems. As your workers learn to see change as an opportunity, they learn and grow as a person.

Blame or Responsibility

Do any of your team think that everything wrong in their performance is someone else’s fault? Laying blame on other employees or supervisors for mistakes doesn’t negate your employees’ part in a difficult situation. Blaming others gives control away and keeps workers from overcoming obstacles.

Taking responsibility for their own actions allows workers to improve and better their situation. Control over their position and performance is basically theirs. Taking responsibility for their performance allows them to make needed changes to learn and grow.

Distract or Commit

Do your workers spend most of their time fantasizing about running away from their work and responsibilities? When IT hits the fan, distressed people often walk away from the challenge. They may even turn to alcohol and other drugs to distract themselves from their lack of control and their failures. When one of your team can’t face a difficult situation, they may quit their job or end a relationship, and distract themselves with something new. But if they don’t learn to deal with stress, their mistakes will follow them in their career and keep them from achieving new goals.

Resilient employees commit to their goals. They understand that while they may need to adjust their plans, reaching a goal requires commitment. If , on the contrary, they don’t get distracted by difficulties, they are showing signs of resilience.

Allow or Act

Allowing challenges like COVID-19 to keep you staff from company and personal goals is a negative reaction to difficulty. When they blame others, lose your control, and get distracted from finding solutions to work problems, they allow problems to stop themselves and maybe their team from succeeding.

If your staff are resilient, they have a goal and a plan. When they know they have control of themselves, they take action to improve their performance. Because you’re committed to helping your workforce learn and grow, you provide them the tools needed to make changes and overcome challenges.

Impatience or Patience

Challenges can create delays in reaching goals. If your workers are too impatient, they may give up their goals too quickly and never succeed. Even when IT hits the fan, you can’t insist on an immediate solution. Some goals require commitment and patience.

Patience takes practice. Are your employees willing to deny themselves an immediate distraction but instead commit to the work needed to achieve their goals? Taking a break can’t become permanent if they want to succeed.

Pessimistic or Optimistic

Ultimately, how your subordinates react to stress and success depends on if their reactions are pessimistic or optimistic. Pessimistic reactions limit ability to overcome challenges. Optimistic reactions give them the control and skills needed to succeed.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

Say Thank You to Past Challenges: Gifts That Build Resilience

How do resilient workers get to become resilient in the first place? What makes someone adjust and recover from job stresses?  Resilient workers owe their resilience to past challenges.  How a person copes with challenges builds their resilience for future ones.  Every resilient employee should say thank you to their past challenges because they made the person they are today.

Each time an employee faces a challenge on-the-job, she has the opportunity to learn, grow, and change.  Psychologists believe that when you successfully navigate a challenge, you build resilience to face another challenge later.  Even failure can help build resilience if a lesson is learned from it.

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Here are the gifts that past challenges offer to help your personnel build resistance:

  • Control
  • Plans
  • Goals
  • Commitment
  • Action
  • Past Success
  • Support System
  • Humor
  • Patience
Control

Past challenges teach valuable lessons about control.  To succeed, one must learn the difference between what an individual can control and what she can’t.  When you understand that you control your actions and reactions, you are building the foundation of resilience.  Knowing what you can control helps you focus on how to cope with challenges throughout their career and, in fact, life.

Plans

Reaching a goal requires planning.  Your team may need to organize their time, workspace, or add to their certifications or education.  When faced with a challenge, having a plan allows them to work toward their goals, regardless of distractions.  Having a plan helps make your team resilient when new challenges appear.

Goals

People who aren’t resilient allow life to dictate their circumstances.  They don’t create goals because they don’t believe they can achieve them.  They let challenges overwhelm them instead of having a clear idea of what they want.  Goals provide a sense of purpose and a reason to be resilient.

Commitment

Resilience is staying committed to a goal and finding ways to cope with challenges. When you learn to commit to goals, you become more resilient to other challenges they may face.  People who aren’t resilient give up when presented with a challenge instead of working toward a resolution.

Action

Overcoming challenges requires action. Each challenge in life pushes you to work to overcome it.  As they take action, they learn new and better ways to cope with challenges.  Your experience and knowledge make you more resilient with each new challenge they face.

Past Successes

There’s nothing better than reaching a goal that they’ve worked hard to achieve.  Their past successes build their self-esteem and confidence, making your staff ready and more resilient for the next challenge. Their past successes also provide a framework for how to cope with other challenges.  That helps them to be more resilient, even if the new challenge is unexpected or difficult like COVID-19 has been for all of us.

Support System

To overcome a challenge, an individual team member often needs a strong support system. If the challenge is personal, she may need the support of friends and family.  If the challenge is professional, she may need the help of a mentor or coworkers.  Building a reliable support system provides endless ‘gifts’ for future challenges.  Employees know who to trust and rely on to help them.  That succeeds in making workers more resilient, and helping them cope.

Humor

Many people find that humor helps them cope.  Especially with thorny problems or situations at work.  Instead of struggling with a challenge, they use humor to lessen stress and accept when they fail.  Having a good sense of humor provides an outlet for stress and disappointment, making workers more resilient when faced with another challenge.

Patience

Not every goal is simple to achieve.  Many goals take time, hard work, and patience.  Being able to accept that a reward isn’t immediate helps make workers resilient in the face of delays and disappointments and potential loss of employment.  Patience helps them cope and stay committed to the company’s goals even when they face obstacles.

Past challenges, however painful at the time, truly are gifts that help your workforce build resilience. Coping with past challenges provides a wealth of skills that are needed for resilience.  They owe their past challenges a thank you!

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

Mindset – Developing Resilience

There are three key steps that your workforce will experience as you facilitate their attempt to build greater resilience.

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1. Understanding

At this stage, they invest energy into learning about the situation they are facing. If they are dealing with a health concern over COVID-19 diagnosis, then this is the research stage where they set out to learn as much as possible. If they are dealing with financial change or workplace challenge, they will still embark on a research project; it will just be shaped by the situation they are dealing with. The first stage is important because it sets the scene for the next two steps.

2. Managing

In this step, you and your employees begin to learn new behaviors and coping strategies. You help them discover what it looks like to take care of themselves on and off the job properly, from physical and mental health to social and financial health. You should teach them new ways to manage stress and deal with unpredictability.

3. Growth

Finally, there is the growth stage. This is when the experience starts to shift your employees’ priorities. They should now understand what is going on, they are learning how to manage it, and now they are growing into a new reality.

Often, this is when workers building resilience start to notice how grateful they are for everything in their life. Gratitude has a large role to play in resilience.

Resilient workers often share several characteristics. One of the biggest is outlook. To build resilience, they must adopt a positive mindset. Because their attitude is key.

For example, if they view failure as a learning opportunity, then they have a greater understanding and are in greater control of their emotions. This type of positive outlook is key to resilience. This positive mindset will serve as their fuel as they attempt to perform effectively on the job in the face of adversity or change from Coronavirus, the economic situation within your company and employment uncertainty, political polarization and ethnic disruption.

In addition to a positive mindset, there are other contributing factors to resilience. One of which is their support network. It’s much easier to build resilience when they have a safety net of people who like and support them.  This is where you should really focus your management efforts on your workforce with programs to build employee reward and recognition that contribute to their self-worth.

What else?
  • A positive view of themselves
  • Feeling secure in their strengths, skills, and ability to deal with difficult situations
  • Being a strong communicator
  • Being a strong problem-solver
  • Maintaining a never-say-die attitude
  • A strong decision-making ability
  • The ability to put together plans and follow-through
  • The ability to see the bigger picture.
Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.