Why Is Being Productive So Important?

Benefits of Being Productive

You’ve likely been told that being productive is important, but you may not know exactly why.  And the answer honestly isn’t that easy, as being productive can affect different parts of your life.

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 You Manage Your Time More Effectively

One thing that productivity does is it allows you to have more control over your life. This way you will have time to do all the activities which truly make you happy while still balancing work life. Not only that, but you won’t ever feel like you’re wasting your time either. And who knows, you might finally have time to try that one thing that has always been on your bucket list.

It Keeps Your Mind Active

As you grow older, according to scientists at Harvard Health, it’s just as important to keep your mind active as it is to keep your body healthy. This is because your mind starts to deteriorate if you don’t constantly keep working and learning new things.

And a deteriorating mind can lead to a group of other problems and diseases, which could lead to an early death. Therefore, focusing on being productive not only keeps your mind engaged but also keeps it active and functioning for years to come—all while you are accomplishing the things you aspire to achieve.

Your Quality Of Life Increases

In this world, everyone knows time is money. So, when you have more time, you’ll likely have more money as well. Just look at some of the most famous CEOs and their productivity levels, and all the fun they get to have.

Honestly, they live a pretty high-quality life no matter how you look at it. This doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll make more money by being productive, but it could mean you’ll finally have time to start that side business you always wanted to.

It’s The Key To Satisfaction

Money can’t buy happiness, but being productive can. The Anxiety and Depression Association for America has found numerous studies that conclude some people can achieve similar results with medication for their depression by increasing productivity only.

Of course, this doesn’t work for everyone, but productivity boosts your mood and motivates you, which will likely increase your outlook on life and emotional health.

FinalPoint

The point is, most people don’t prioritize productivity as they should. Productivity is truly the key to better time management, which has proven to keep your mind healthy and satisfied for years to come.

Mental Trauma of COVID and 6 Steps to Protect Employees

According to the Washington Post, “Nearly half of Americans report the coronavirus crisis is harming their mental health, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation poll. A federal emergency hotline for people in emotional distress registered a more than 1,000 percent increase in one month compared with the same time in 2019. In one month, roughly 20,000 people texted that hotline, run by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.”

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It’s terrifying to realize a pandemic such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) remains around the world. The different stages of a pandemic can provide panic and anxiety. No one knows just how widespread or deadly the novel coronavirus will end up being.  But being proactive about your workers’ mental health can help to keep their mind and body healthy.

In the following information, we have detailed suggestions on ways to protect yourself and your staff.

One of the first steps you can take is to recognize the things you can control. Practicing self-care such as seeking professional help from a licensed mental health professional and finding ways to manage stress. Your means of coping with stress and anxiety goes a long way in managing your mental health. Here are some ways to help you ease anxiety surrounding COVID-19.

1. Help Employees Practice Good Self-Care

Eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, and engaging in some form of exercise may seem obvious since we were taught them as early as grammar school.  But they are always good steps to helping your personnel stay as physically and psychologically healthy as possible during stressful times.

Good self-care also keeps your workers’ immune system healthy which means eating well, sleeping well, and managing stress.

2. Peace of Mind

Practice recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control, The World Health Organization, and other excerpts to curtail transmission of COVID-19 still include wearing a mask when going out, keeping at least 6-foot distance from others, and washing your hands regularly.

If you live in an area where the COVID-19 infection rates are very high, try to stay home as much possible, avoid crowds, and when do you go out practice the methods of safety detailed above. There are always steps you can take to decrease risk. Be aware that steps like washing your hands, wearing a mask, and keeping social distance remind you to focus on the things you can control.

Knowing you are doing everything possible to keep safe gives a lot of peace of mind.

3. Professional Help

If your staff’s  mental health is being affected by the stress and anxiety of COVID-19 then they may need to seek support.

Workers experiencing burnout should reach out to their Human Resources department. Frequently supervisors are not familiar with what benefits are offered, particularly relating to mental health. But HR personnel are more aware of what’s available from a company and will be able to help obtain those resources.

It might mean to seek the help of a mental health professional. A licensed mental health professional can help you manage stress while helping you to make the best personal decisions. The good news is thousands of therapists are now using remote methods, such as video conferencing, telemedicine so you can talk to someone right from home or your workplace (in private, of course).

High anxiety and stress can cause some workers to adopt unproven or unsafe prevention methods. Some of these methods can be harmful to you and others. It’s important to make sure any actions you take are truly beneficial.

“Although the world is full of suffering, it is full also of the overcoming of it.” – Helen Keller

4. Develop an Action Plan

Be aware that increased depression and anxiety is probably going to occur with your workers. So, plan for it. If they start to feel sad, overwhelmed, frustrated or anxious – talk with them, have them write about it, just get it out, do not let it fester inside them. Be prepared and make a plan. Who to talk to?.

Another important issue is that employees often adopt the coping strategies they observe in their bosses.  Supervisors who show anxiety and stress during a pandemic may end up projecting the anxiety right along to their subordinates.

5. Read News From Trustworthy Sources And Limit Media Consumption

Avoid media outlets that provoke stress or focus on issues that can’t be controlled. Instead, turn to sources that give reliable information. One reputable source is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They provide helpful tips to keep you and your co-workers safe during these unprecedented times.

Watching media stories that talk about how fast an illness is spreading, or the death toll will increase stress and anxiety. Limit your media consumption to a certain time frame or a certain number of stories.

It is helpful to stay informed, but you shouldn’t allow yourself to be bombarded with anxiety-provoking news all day. The most important actions are to keep you and your workers properly informed, calm, and healthy as possible.

6. The Bottom Line

Remember one thing.  People are strong.  We will get through this.  It is not forever and most important do not project what has not yet happened. If you are healthy and safe, don’t worry about what might happen.  Get vaccinated when it is your turn.  Stay in the moment and enjoy the present.

Need Help Finding Top Performers for your Team?

Call Flexicrew. As one of  the Southeast’s top staffing agencies, we have 14 years experience serving employers – and helping them find truly exceptional people. Contact us today to learn more!

5 Signs You Have an Employee with an Anger Problem

All personnel get angry and lash out occasionally. It’s likely you and the line supervisors do too.  Experts say it’s even healthy to vent one’s anger from time to time. It can also shield us from other people trying to hurt us or someone else.

The problems start when one of your personnel lets their anger get out of hand.

Rampant anger makes a worker feel like they’re losing control, almost like they are not themselves. It’s not the best feeling in the world. It often takes its toll on peoples’ health, work relationships, as well as their career. It can even get them in trouble with the law.

If you think you have an employee suffering from a hidden anger problem, you’ve come to the right place. Recognition is an important part of solving any problem. Being aware of their anger issues (both you and them) is the first step towards positive change.

In this article, we’ll talk about five signs that alert you to an employee’ anger problem. We’ll also discuss the difference between healthy and unhealthy feelings of anger. Once you see the difference, you can be on the lookout for and help workers control their emotions, rather than the other way around.

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Let’s get started!

Healthy vs Unhealthy Anger

Before we talk about different types of anger, we need to learn how to recognize anger. You should also know what sets it off. Start by asking these questions:

  • What situations/events/places/people make our workers angry?
  • How can I tell when workers are angry?
  • How do they react when they’re angry?
  • How does their anger affect those around them?
Healthy Anger

Healthy anger is an instinctive signal that lights up when people sense that something isn’t right. If you see someone of your staff being hurt or treated unfairly, their anger acts as a catalyst. So, you immediately start thinking of ways to help.

Dr. Robert M. Fraum, Ph.D. says, “Healthy anger is deliberate, proportional, and responsive to a clear and present need. [it’s] a powerful tool of human survival and adaptation.”

Unhealthy Anger

On the other hand, unhealthy anger hurts everyone around, instead of helping. Remember, if you experience workers showing one or more of these behaviors from time to time, it doesn’t mean they have an anger problem. The problem intensifies according to the frequency of these behaviors and their consequences.

The following are a few ways unhealthy anger can manifest itself in several ways, such as:

  • Rage
  • Resentment
  • Manipulation
  • Judgment
  • Passive aggression
  • Verbal or physical abuse
5 Signs Employees Have an Anger Problem

If you’re worried about whether the anger level of someone at your workplace is unhealthy or not, keep reading. You’ll find five of the most common signs of an anger management issue.

1.   A Worker Gets into Arguments

We’re not talking about casual arguments an employee has with a co-worker. We’re talking frequent, overblown rows with everyone s/he encounters, even strangers.

Not only that, but that person feels that they have to win every single argument. Not being able to back down from an argument has nothing to do with what s/he is arguing about. But it has everything to do with being more domineering and in control.

If these arguments seem to come out of nowhere and quickly spin out of control, that’s a sign that person’s anger has turned into a problem.

2.   A Worker is Passive Aggressive

People often don’t relate passive aggressiveness with anger. It’s neither loud nor violent.

Yet, it’s one of the most telling signs of anger management issues. The problem is that workers may not even realize they’re being passive-aggressive. Not only that, but they may not even realize they’re angry.

One reason is that when your employee is passive-aggressive, his emotions give the impression that he’s in control. For example, he avoids conflict, he’s often sarcastic, or indifferent.

3.   A Worker Blames Co-workers or Supervisors

For a worker blaming other team members for his work problems is easier than having to deal with them himself. While he may do this unknowingly, it’s usually a sign he’s not dealing with his own, that’s also a sign of trouble.

Another sign of an anger problem is that a staff member holds on to resentment. S/he stays bitter and can’t seem to forgive even over the small stuff.

4.   A Worker’s Anger Causes Others to Fear Them

If one of your personnel usually overreacts when angry, this can make associates start to avoid him whenever they get the chance. They become fearful of him and his over-the-top reactions when he’s mad.

You may notice that when associates talk to one given worker, they never come too close. They may also stand with their arms crossed over their chest or they have one foot turned to face the door. This is their way of expressing their fear and anxiety when they’re around that associate.

5.   You Worry about A Worker’s Reactions

This is both good and bad news. The bad news is that once you’ve reached this stage, it’s more than likely that you have an employee with an anger problem.

The good news is you’re starting to acknowledge that there’s a problem and you’re worried about his behavior. This is the first step to confronting him and helping him work through his anger issues and helping him gain control over his emotions.

 

A Final Note

If you or a supervisor notices one of your personnel in one or more of these five signs, it means you have an employee anger problem. His recognition and admitting it is the first step to a solution.

The next step is to seek help. Remember, anger is nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about. But it could result in seriously damaging his life or hurting him or someone on his team. The sooner you get him the help he needs, the sooner he’ll be able to live a healthier, more fulfilling life and you’ll have an overall more productive work environment.

How to Protect Your Mental Health During the Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has been brutal on the state of mental health in Americans. You’ve been limited in how you can celebrate birthdays, graduations, and weddings. You’ve seen loved ones hooked up to a ventilator fighting for their lives. You’ve got an entire hygienic routine every time you leave the house: Wear a mask, stay six feet apart, wash your hands, and repeat.

Here’s what you can do to protect your mental health during this ongoing pandemic.resilience (2)

Get some Exercise

You don’t have to go to the gym to stay in shape. There are actually plenty of exercises and routines that you can do from the comfort of your own living room. That includes exercises like push-ups, jumping jacks, burpees, and even going for a nice jog around the block.

On top of building your endurance and strength, exercise can trigger the release of endorphins in your system. According to the Mayo Clinic, these are known as the “feel-good” hormone and will naturally boost a low mood during such trying times.

Stay in Contact with Loved Ones

Not being able to meet with those you care about can be detrimental to your mental health. Prolonged loneliness and social isolation can increase your risk of certain mental health disorders, substance abuse issues, or even suicide.

In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that loneliness in older adults increases the risk of dementia and other serious health disorders. The best way to avoid these consequences is by staying in touch with loved ones via daily or weekly phone calls, video calls, or text messages.

Leave the House

Most states still have limitations when it comes to where you can go, what you can do, and who you can see. Yet at this point in the pandemic, you realize that your mood declines and you feel fatigued the longer you stay put in the house.

In a study published in Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vitamin D, which can be absorbed by the body from sunlight, is a great mood booster and actually is used to treat depression. So, if you’re feeling down and lonely in the house, spend some time in the backyard or go for a walk at the park before your fellow citizens get there.

Reach Out to a Therapist

If you were already struggling with your mental health prior to the pandemic, there’s a good chance that your situation has actually worsened as the months continued. Luckily, the forced closure of most mental health facilities doesn’t mean that you currently have no access to care. Many counselors, therapists, and psychiatrists have moved to telemedicine for the time being. Scheduling an appointment with a therapist via video call is a great way to process your emotions and learn how to cope.

Get a Pet

Most people would appreciate coming home from work every day to be greeted by a friendly dog or cat. But when loneliness and sadness become excessive during quarantine, a pet may be exactly what you need to feel better.

Even better, you may be able to help empty out your local animal shelter. The connection between pet ownership and mental health has been long studied. In fact, a survey conducted by the Human Animal Bond Research Institute, mental health improvements were seen in about 74% of pet owners.

Final Thoughts

During a pandemic that doesn’t seem to be ending anytime soon, it’s important that you prioritize your mental health. Not only will this make you feel less lonely and like you have a greater purpose, but it’ll also save you from a ton of emotional turmoil that you’ll have to sort through once COVID-19 is gone for good.