Ways to Get a Manufacturing Job Near You

How to Land a Manufacturing Job

Here are five ways to get a manufacturing job near you.  These 5 tips can  not only lead to getting a manufacturing job, but can also gain promotions over time to supervisory positions.

1.Adapt Your Resume

Tailor your resume to the manufacturing  job you seek by emphasizing pertinent experience, talents and trainings. Check the above list to ensure your resume fits.  When you tie your resume to the job you are giving yourself the best chance of being seen as a great fit. Competition is stiff and you want to make it as easy as possible for the person reviewing resumes.

So give this considerable thought:  customize your resume to the job you’re applying for, as best you can.  Despite claims that the resume is dead, resumes are still one of your strongest marketing tools. Even in this ill-designed, ridiculously frustrating hiring process. And its job continues long AFTER an initial screener sees it.

2. Show You Can Work Under Pressure

Production lines tend to be fast-paced and high-pressured. Show your ability by demonstrating talent under pressure. Establish on your resume that you are good at managing your time and prioritizing tasks.  Make evident that you pay attention to detail, while you also work well as part of a team. Previous positions in manufacturing support your claim.

3. Skill with Hand Tools

What?…

Though you mainly operate heavy machinery, you will still need to handle basic hand tools like hammers, wrenches, pliers, and screwdrivers. Why?  You will use these particularly if the  production line keeps sticking or snagging.

4. Accumulate Important Credentials

You can qualify for a manufacturing job with a simple GED.  However, earning additional related qualifications will help you be a stronger candidate. When you have achieved a position in manufacturing, you really should actively pursue further qualifications.  Devoting yourself to master your craft is the finest investment you can make. Relevant qualifications can also help you gain a promotions and pay raises.

5. Work with a Staffing Agency that’s a Manufacturing Expert

As a dedicated manufacturing staffing agency, Flexicrew has a close relationships with manufacturing companies. This is important for  your job search. A recruiting firm that specializes in manufacturing will understand you and the position you seek and understand if a manufacturer will be a decent fit for you. Your skill and experience should get a manufacturing job that’s near you. The knowledge and experience of a dedicated manufacturing staffing agency will make sure that the job is with the right employer.

Flexicrew Support

To learn how Flexicrew has helped thousands of jobseekers like you land their ideal manufacturing job, get in touch now. You’ll be pleased you did.

 

Stay Sane During COVID: Stay Grounded By Accepting Reality

It has been difficult to stay grounded during the pandemic.  By this point, your nerves are frayed, and your hands chapped from all the handwashing and sanitizing. It has been a lot.

Of course, that’s nothing compared to those who have fallen ill, passed away, or ‘recovered’ with lasting effects. The two are related, by doing the first things we are certain we can prevent the latter thing from occurring.

Stay grounded during pandemic

It’s certainly a good way to mitigate the risk. Lots of kids are at home, with many schools yet to return, a lot of people are working from home or laid off. We have not met our friends and family in-person for what seems like forever. For a time, the grocery shelves were wiped out and people were spending an hour in line in hopes of fulfilling their list.

Life has changed in a series of big and small ways due to COVID-19. The only highlight of this is that everyone else is going through it, too. We are all going through this same tumultuous event and we’re all in it together. At least, we should be.

There is nothing funny about a pandemic, but it’s important to stay grounded. As difficult as it seems, it’s important to accept reality and not catastrophize about what hasn’t yet happened. We all cope differently with horrible situations, and we all struggle with our locus of control.

The Acceptance of Reality

There are things you can do to exercise control in this situation. Focus on those things to reduce your risk. Firstly, it’s important that you sleep well, eat well, and move often. Those are basics of life that stand true in normal times and during a pandemic.

It’s also important that you pay attention to social distancing. If you’re allowed to have contact with others, then do so, but do it safely. That means wearing a mask, handwashing, and sanitizing often. A bit of anxiety can be productive if it is causing you to take proper precautions to prevent the spread of the virus. If we didn’t have a level of reasonable worry, then no one would take the appropriate measures to protect themselves and others.

There is unproductive anxiety, too. Where you allow it to spin out of control by imaging what would happen if you caught it, or your child caught it, or someone you know caught it. It’s happened to other people so it’s not ridiculous to imagine that someone close to you could catch a highly communicable disease.

You can counteract thoughts like that by focusing on the present. Remind yourself you are safe at home as you cook dinner, binge watch, play with your kids, or complete your workday.

You can think about it all day, but it won’t change anything, and it won’t make you feel better.

Staying Sane

What began as a tragic story on the news has become a very real threat to our world. In all likelihood, you know someone who has been touched by COVID-19, if not you personally. Stay grounded; you are not minimizing the pandemic or sticking your head in the sand. You are simply taking the necessary steps to protect your mental health and stay sane. Think of all the steps you have been taking to protect your physical health.

Now think about what steps you have taken to protect your emotional and mental health. With that in mind, what are you going to do to ensure you stay grounded by accepting the reality of the pandemic while avoiding worrying about things that have not happened.

4 Simple Ways to Take Charge of Your Work Habits

There’s an old quote that perfectly shows why you need to take charge of your habits – be they work habits or personal. “The chains of habit are too light to be felt until they are too heavy to be broken.” by Warren Buffet. If you don’t take charge of your habits, even ones that seem harmless, they will easily control you.

While work habits are easily formed and followed through, especially once your brain recognizes them as habits, you can still change them. Always remember that you are in control, not your habits.  So, you can change bad patterns , even those you’ve had for a long time.

C

Habit expert and writer of the book ‘Atomic Habits’ James Clear has four rules for forming habits that can help you take charge of them. Whether the habits are good or bad, you can still use these rules to gain some measure of control. These rules, according to Atomic Habits, are:

1. Make it obvious

2. Make it attractive

3. Make it easy

4. Make it satisfying

Let’s go over them one-by-one.

1.Make it Obvious

To take charge of your habits, you need to make them obvious. For example, let’s say you want to start running. If your running shoes and gear are in the closet, then that habit isn’t apparent. Instead of sifting through your wardrobe for your shoes, your brain will just want to stay in bed.

So, you can put your running shoes by the door and make sure that they are the first thing you see in the morning. Then you’ll be reminded that you should run today. To break bad habits, you want to hide things away – make them less obvious.

2. Make it Attractive

With habits, most people focus on the long-term goals. You might say, “I will go for a run to get my beach body in ten weeks.” While that goal is noble, it does nothing when running in the cold and feeling miserable.

So, make your routines attractive and give yourself a reward or incentive to get it done. Maybe run with a friend or have your running trail pass by a place where you can have breakfast or see the city’s sunrise. For bad patterns , add extra steps or make continuing the tendency very unattractive.

3. Make it Easy

Remember, the brain always takes on the path of least resistance. If that path happens to lead to your habit, then more power to you. It might seem counter-intuitive, but instead of telling yourself. I will run a mile today; say that you will only run a block.

Having smaller micro-habits will make everything easier and will help you do them. Most people go too big, get discouraged, and then get burned out. But running a block, reading one page of a book, or doing one push-up is something that takes no time at all. Plus, if you achieve a  small one, why not do another and another?

For bad habits, add more resistance to them and make them harder to achieve.

4. Make it Satisfying

Reward yourself along the journey toward achieving your desired habits, and you’ll keep doing them. Maybe if you go running for thirty days, give yourself some type of reward. Have a good meal, watch a movie, do something you wouldn’t normally do, and also reflect on how running has made you a better person than you were 30 days ago.

For bad habits, remove the satisfaction from them, and you won’t see them as a reward.

You Are In Control of Your Work Habits

Remember that every habit comes from your own brain, and you are the one in control. If you want to make or break a habit, you are the only one who can do so. Follow these four steps, and you’ll find that it gets easier and easier to take charge and make your work habits work for you.

The Harm Resentments Can Have on Work Relationships

Resentment is the feeling that you’re being overlooked, treated unfairly, or not getting the respect or appreciation you deserve. It’s been compared to drinking poison but waiting for the other person to die. It eats at you, sometimes for years on end, but the only one who suffers is you.

Two angry workers

Here are 5 important tips to help you avoid one of the most toxic elements in any work relationship we call resentment:

1. Ask, instead of assuming

We’re all busy, juggling many things at once, so much so that we take what’s important for granted, especially with those who work closest to us. Sometimes life gets in the way of us feeling appreciated and respected, even to the point of living with personal integrity.

We ignore what’s bothering us because it’s easier, hoping it’ll go away on its own or magically disappear into thin air. Yet ignoring issues like this doesn’t make them go away, it makes them grow until they’re too big to handle. That’s when the state of your co-worker interactions really starts to feel the weight of these problems.

And you know it’s there, but you don’t know what to do about it. Many times, we don’t bring up certain issues because we’re afraid to confront our bosses or peers and shy away from conflicts. But by doing this, you’re pushing away your associate without realizing it and this is one way that resentment builds up.

2. Be part of the solution, not the problem

Putting blame won’t get you anywhere; in fact, most times it just makes things that much worse. Instead, work at overcoming your anger and distrust so you can reach an agreement. Showing empathy is a big part of this process, especially after an argument because it tells your associate that you understand how they feel and why they did so-and-so. Empathy really goes a long way.

3. Give each other some space

When you first start working with another employee, you can’t imagine going an hour without approaching a work process with your supervisor or teammate or hearing each other’s take, let alone a whole day. But as you mature into a steady working relationship, and you gain experience, it’s wise to find some tasks you can accomplish working on your own.

This maintains your sense of self, while giving you something to chat about, so it’s a win-win. Taking some “me” time and distancing yourself from your work partner could be something you do periodically.  The point is to make yourself a priority during that time, so you came back into a close working relationship with fresh eyes and a sense of looking forward to camaraderie.

4. Don’t let small things grow and fester

Wouldn’t it be so much easier if your work partner just apologized when appropriate? Work would be so simple and pleasant. But it’s not always like that. It’s normal to have disagreements or arguments, big and small.

Feeling anger and hurt on occasion is also alright. But don’t sit on these feelings, waiting for that perfect moment to let it all out. You and your co-worker should be each other’s supporter and shoulder to lean on through difficult projects. Remember, you’re on the same team.

5. Communicate

Talking and listening requires a bit of vulnerability, which can be difficult at times, especially if you harbor feelings of mistrust or resentment. But there’s no way around it, opening up is crucial to healthy rapport.

Talk honestly with your associate and ask to be really listened to. And it’s important to listen without judgment when it’s your turn to be attentive to your associate. Practicing these confidence-boosting techniques will bring you and your workmate closer and more productive as a team.

It’ll also help break any, barriers either one of you had put up as a defense mechanism because, let’s be honest, we are on our guard at work. So why do we make it even harder on ourselves and keep our guard up even with our work partner?

Workplace relationships need work and care. That’s where people make the mistake of forgetting about the small details of everyday projects. We just say or do something without thinking it through.

But the truth is it does matter and over time, some of these things linger and fester into something ugly that brings out the bad in everything, and ultimately suffocates any good working relationship. Resolving issues before they get out of hand is the key to avoiding resentment and enjoying a cheerful, efficient, and balanced workday.

Flexicrew Support

At Flexicrew we constantly help workers with everything from interviewing to how to conduct themselves through stressful job situations.  Contact us Today to find out how we can help.

Sources

https://www.lifeadvancer.com/resentment-in-relationships

https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/marriage-resentment/

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/terry-gaspard-msw-licsw/is-resentment-ruining-your-marriage_b_5531600.html

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/anger-in-the-age-entitlement/201109/chains-resentment

https://www.bustle.com/articles/161065-7-signs-your-partner-resents-you

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inviting-monkey-tea/201711/can-relationship-recover-resentment

 

5 Signs You Have an Employee with an Anger Problem

All personnel get angry and lash out occasionally. It’s likely you and the line supervisors do too.  Experts say it’s even healthy to vent one’s anger from time to time. It can also shield us from other people trying to hurt us or someone else.

The problems start when one of your personnel lets their anger get out of hand.

Rampant anger makes a worker feel like they’re losing control, almost like they are not themselves. It’s not the best feeling in the world. It often takes its toll on peoples’ health, work relationships, as well as their career. It can even get them in trouble with the law.

If you think you have an employee suffering from a hidden anger problem, you’ve come to the right place. Recognition is an important part of solving any problem. Being aware of their anger issues (both you and them) is the first step towards positive change.

In this article, we’ll talk about five signs that alert you to an employee’ anger problem. We’ll also discuss the difference between healthy and unhealthy feelings of anger. Once you see the difference, you can be on the lookout for and help workers control their emotions, rather than the other way around.

Punch through Wall

Let’s get started!

Healthy vs Unhealthy Anger

Before we talk about different types of anger, we need to learn how to recognize anger. You should also know what sets it off. Start by asking these questions:

  • What situations/events/places/people make our workers angry?
  • How can I tell when workers are angry?
  • How do they react when they’re angry?
  • How does their anger affect those around them?
Healthy Anger

Healthy anger is an instinctive signal that lights up when people sense that something isn’t right. If you see someone of your staff being hurt or treated unfairly, their anger acts as a catalyst. So, you immediately start thinking of ways to help.

Dr. Robert M. Fraum, Ph.D. says, “Healthy anger is deliberate, proportional, and responsive to a clear and present need. [it’s] a powerful tool of human survival and adaptation.”

Unhealthy Anger

On the other hand, unhealthy anger hurts everyone around, instead of helping. Remember, if you experience workers showing one or more of these behaviors from time to time, it doesn’t mean they have an anger problem. The problem intensifies according to the frequency of these behaviors and their consequences.

The following are a few ways unhealthy anger can manifest itself in several ways, such as:

  • Rage
  • Resentment
  • Manipulation
  • Judgment
  • Passive aggression
  • Verbal or physical abuse
5 Signs Employees Have an Anger Problem

If you’re worried about whether the anger level of someone at your workplace is unhealthy or not, keep reading. You’ll find five of the most common signs of an anger management issue.

1.   A Worker Gets into Arguments

We’re not talking about casual arguments an employee has with a co-worker. We’re talking frequent, overblown rows with everyone s/he encounters, even strangers.

Not only that, but that person feels that they have to win every single argument. Not being able to back down from an argument has nothing to do with what s/he is arguing about. But it has everything to do with being more domineering and in control.

If these arguments seem to come out of nowhere and quickly spin out of control, that’s a sign that person’s anger has turned into a problem.

2.   A Worker is Passive Aggressive

People often don’t relate passive aggressiveness with anger. It’s neither loud nor violent.

Yet, it’s one of the most telling signs of anger management issues. The problem is that workers may not even realize they’re being passive-aggressive. Not only that, but they may not even realize they’re angry.

One reason is that when your employee is passive-aggressive, his emotions give the impression that he’s in control. For example, he avoids conflict, he’s often sarcastic, or indifferent.

3.   A Worker Blames Co-workers or Supervisors

For a worker blaming other team members for his work problems is easier than having to deal with them himself. While he may do this unknowingly, it’s usually a sign he’s not dealing with his own, that’s also a sign of trouble.

Another sign of an anger problem is that a staff member holds on to resentment. S/he stays bitter and can’t seem to forgive even over the small stuff.

4.   A Worker’s Anger Causes Others to Fear Them

If one of your personnel usually overreacts when angry, this can make associates start to avoid him whenever they get the chance. They become fearful of him and his over-the-top reactions when he’s mad.

You may notice that when associates talk to one given worker, they never come too close. They may also stand with their arms crossed over their chest or they have one foot turned to face the door. This is their way of expressing their fear and anxiety when they’re around that associate.

5.   You Worry about A Worker’s Reactions

This is both good and bad news. The bad news is that once you’ve reached this stage, it’s more than likely that you have an employee with an anger problem.

The good news is you’re starting to acknowledge that there’s a problem and you’re worried about his behavior. This is the first step to confronting him and helping him work through his anger issues and helping him gain control over his emotions.

 

A Final Note

If you or a supervisor notices one of your personnel in one or more of these five signs, it means you have an employee anger problem. His recognition and admitting it is the first step to a solution.

The next step is to seek help. Remember, anger is nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about. But it could result in seriously damaging his life or hurting him or someone on his team. The sooner you get him the help he needs, the sooner he’ll be able to live a healthier, more fulfilling life and you’ll have an overall more productive work environment.

If You Believe You Are a Victim You Always Will Be

Every day brings a series of small and large challenges that workers sometimes win by overcoming them and sometimes lose by failing.  Most workers adapt to these challenges and understand that these challenges help them grow in their profession  even when they fail.  But if they believe they’re a victim of circumstances, they will find themselves being the victim even when they could have succeeded.

Feeling like a victim often starts early in life and maybe triggered by trauma.  As a child, some situations may be forced on you that are unfair, difficult, or harmful.  As an adult, a series of losses can lead to feeling like you have little control.resilience (2)

Lack of control is a hallmark of feeling like a victim. Victims believe they are powerless to change, improve, or overcome obstacles.

Victims feel helpless.  They often feel trapped by circumstances and believe they aren’t capable of overcoming their situation.  These feelings can cause a person to give up on themselves, their goals, and their performance.

Psychologists agree that believing you are a victim creates a cycle where your beliefs make you a victim over and over again.

According to Psychology Today, a leading group of psychologists and researchers, the beliefs a person has directly affect how they cope with challenges. These specialists have identified certain beliefs that lead to victim behavior.

  • Why try? I never win
  • Trust no one
  • I can’t
  • Everyone else is better than me
Why try? I never win

Everyone loses sometimes. Even a sports team with a perfect season rarely has more than one perfect season in a row.  In life, just like sports, you can lose sometimes and still win the overall prize in the end.  But if you let your losses overshadow your accomplishments, you can start to believe that your wins aren’t real or substantial.  When you see life as always loosing, it’s not worth trying for anything, and what you lose is the opportunity to win.

Trust no one

Victims don’t trust anyone. They believe that everyone else is against them and out to harm them.  Even innocent slights by others are perceived as intentional hurt.  While not everyone in life is willing to accept and help you, most people don’t spend all their time trying to hurt others.  Believing that you can’t trust anyone means that you will miss out on confiding and accepting help from people that could and would support you.  Without support, you remain a victim.

I Can’t

Feeling powerless robs you of control. If you believe that you don’t have control, you may start to feel like you are a victim.  “I can’t” becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Lack of commitment to change, refusal to learn and grow, and inability to accept mistakes as part of the path to success, all make it impossible to do something positive in your position.  It’s not that you can’t; it’s that you believe you can’t, so you don’t.

Everyone else is better than me

The powerless of believing you’re a victim elevates peers and co-workers above you. When you give others more control and power than you, you always remain a victim.  Believing everyone else is smarter, stronger, and more accomplished than you keep you from trying to improve and traps you as a victim.  Until you believe in yourself, you will always be a victim.

Work can be hard at times.  It’s possible to fail during the learning process and ultimately achieve goals.  But if you believe you are a victim of life, you always will be.  Letting others have power over you and giving up your control keeps you from the opportunities work offers to grow, change, and achieve.

Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need assistance recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in these challenging times, contact Flexicrew Today.

The Victim Mentality – Life Seems Unfair

Ongoing stress or a distressful situation can lead to the victim mentality. According to Healthline, a leading internet medical information provider, some people who experience ordeal may lose their sense of control over their lives and feel helpless when confronted with changes or challenges.  They feel trapped by circumstances that they think they have no control over and give up on being able to cope with or improve their situation.

People can be victims without developing the victim mentality.  When life seems unfair, or things don’t happen the way people want them to, most people adjust, adapt, and cope with their circumstances.  They make changes to improve themselves and their situation.

victim

People with the victim mentality are unable to make positive changes that help them control their circumstances. A person with the victim mentality always considers themselves a victim and behave as if they always will be the victim.  Even when they aren’t a victim, they refuse to see the difference between their perception of victimhood and reality.

Psychologists who study people’s reactions to disturbance believe the victim mentality is an acquired personality trait.  By thinking and acting as if they are always a victim, people’s personality becomes that of a victim no matter the circumstances.  The victim mentality includes thoughts and actions that keep people trapped as a victim.

Feeling Powerless

With the victim mentality, people feel powerless and unable to cope. They can’t find solutions for their problems because they don’t believe they have any power over themselves or their circumstances.  The victim mentality creates additional situations throughout life where people feel like victims because of the perception of powerlessness.

Feeling All Problems are Disasters

For people with the victim mentality, even small problems and challenges in life are perceived as significant disasters. They become upset and unreasonable when they feel the slightest thing is out of place or not up to their standards and expectations.  Because people with the victim mentality can’t find solutions, every problem they encounter feels like it’s unfixable and unending.

Thinking Others are Purposefully Trying to Cause Harm

Have you ever confronted someone about why they didn’t acknowledge you or do something to help you only to find that they were completely unaware of the situation? It’s easy to feel slighted when you think someone hasn’t responded to your needs, but the truth is they are often so wrapped up in their own lives; they aren’t fully aware of yours.

People with the victim mentality don’t see these types of situations as unintentional.  Instead, they believe other people are always out to hurt or harm them.  Because they don’t feel like they have control over their lives, they think that any lack of acknowledgment or help is a direct affront designed to hurt them.

Feeling Singled Out for Mistreatment

The victim mentality makes people feel that they are alone in their victimhood and receive worse treatment than others in the same situation. When a negative situation affects an entire group of people, they think that it’s harder and worse for them.  They may feel that they were included in the group only to make their lives worse, not because of circumstances but because they were singled out for mistreatment.

Being Unforgiving

When a situation is someone else’s fault, a person with the victim mentality refuses to forgive a sincerely offered apology or offers to make things right.  They may fear being hurt again by the same person.  They refuse to accept that others can make mistakes without malice or specific intent to harm them.

The victim mentality is a learned personality trait that results from not coping with and processing past distress. Because a person with the victim mentality can’t cope with challenges and problems, they feel they are always the victim of circumstances or other people’s intentional mistreatment.  The victim mentality makes people unable to take control of their lives and their responses to difficulty, keeping them always feeling like a victim.

Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need assistance recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in these challenging times, contact Flexicrew Today.