5 Signs You Have an Employee with an Anger Problem

All personnel get angry and lash out occasionally. It’s likely you and the line supervisors do too.  Experts say it’s even healthy to vent one’s anger from time to time. It can also shield us from other people trying to hurt us or someone else.

The problems start when one of your personnel lets their anger get out of hand.

Rampant anger makes a worker feel like they’re losing control, almost like they are not themselves. It’s not the best feeling in the world. It often takes its toll on peoples’ health, work relationships, as well as their career. It can even get them in trouble with the law.

If you think you have an employee suffering from a hidden anger problem, you’ve come to the right place. Recognition is an important part of solving any problem. Being aware of their anger issues (both you and them) is the first step towards positive change.

In this article, we’ll talk about five signs that alert you to an employee’ anger problem. We’ll also discuss the difference between healthy and unhealthy feelings of anger. Once you see the difference, you can be on the lookout for and help workers control their emotions, rather than the other way around.

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Let’s get started!

Healthy vs Unhealthy Anger

Before we talk about different types of anger, we need to learn how to recognize anger. You should also know what sets it off. Start by asking these questions:

  • What situations/events/places/people make our workers angry?
  • How can I tell when workers are angry?
  • How do they react when they’re angry?
  • How does their anger affect those around them?
Healthy Anger

Healthy anger is an instinctive signal that lights up when people sense that something isn’t right. If you see someone of your staff being hurt or treated unfairly, their anger acts as a catalyst. So, you immediately start thinking of ways to help.

Dr. Robert M. Fraum, Ph.D. says, “Healthy anger is deliberate, proportional, and responsive to a clear and present need. [it’s] a powerful tool of human survival and adaptation.”

Unhealthy Anger

On the other hand, unhealthy anger hurts everyone around, instead of helping. Remember, if you experience workers showing one or more of these behaviors from time to time, it doesn’t mean they have an anger problem. The problem intensifies according to the frequency of these behaviors and their consequences.

The following are a few ways unhealthy anger can manifest itself in several ways, such as:

  • Rage
  • Resentment
  • Manipulation
  • Judgment
  • Passive aggression
  • Verbal or physical abuse
5 Signs Employees Have an Anger Problem

If you’re worried about whether the anger level of someone at your workplace is unhealthy or not, keep reading. You’ll find five of the most common signs of an anger management issue.

1.   A Worker Gets into Arguments

We’re not talking about casual arguments an employee has with a co-worker. We’re talking frequent, overblown rows with everyone s/he encounters, even strangers.

Not only that, but that person feels that they have to win every single argument. Not being able to back down from an argument has nothing to do with what s/he is arguing about. But it has everything to do with being more domineering and in control.

If these arguments seem to come out of nowhere and quickly spin out of control, that’s a sign that person’s anger has turned into a problem.

2.   A Worker is Passive Aggressive

People often don’t relate passive aggressiveness with anger. It’s neither loud nor violent.

Yet, it’s one of the most telling signs of anger management issues. The problem is that workers may not even realize they’re being passive-aggressive. Not only that, but they may not even realize they’re angry.

One reason is that when your employee is passive-aggressive, his emotions give the impression that he’s in control. For example, he avoids conflict, he’s often sarcastic, or indifferent.

3.   A Worker Blames Co-workers or Supervisors

For a worker blaming other team members for his work problems is easier than having to deal with them himself. While he may do this unknowingly, it’s usually a sign he’s not dealing with his own, that’s also a sign of trouble.

Another sign of an anger problem is that a staff member holds on to resentment. S/he stays bitter and can’t seem to forgive even over the small stuff.

4.   A Worker’s Anger Causes Others to Fear Them

If one of your personnel usually overreacts when angry, this can make associates start to avoid him whenever they get the chance. They become fearful of him and his over-the-top reactions when he’s mad.

You may notice that when associates talk to one given worker, they never come too close. They may also stand with their arms crossed over their chest or they have one foot turned to face the door. This is their way of expressing their fear and anxiety when they’re around that associate.

5.   You Worry about A Worker’s Reactions

This is both good and bad news. The bad news is that once you’ve reached this stage, it’s more than likely that you have an employee with an anger problem.

The good news is you’re starting to acknowledge that there’s a problem and you’re worried about his behavior. This is the first step to confronting him and helping him work through his anger issues and helping him gain control over his emotions.

 

A Final Note

If you or a supervisor notices one of your personnel in one or more of these five signs, it means you have an employee anger problem. His recognition and admitting it is the first step to a solution.

The next step is to seek help. Remember, anger is nothing to be ashamed or embarrassed about. But it could result in seriously damaging his life or hurting him or someone on his team. The sooner you get him the help he needs, the sooner he’ll be able to live a healthier, more fulfilling life and you’ll have an overall more productive work environment.

If You Believe You Are a Victim You Always Will Be

Every day brings a series of small and large challenges that workers sometimes win by overcoming them and sometimes lose by failing.  Most workers adapt to these challenges and understand that these challenges help them grow in their profession  even when they fail.  But if they believe they’re a victim of circumstances, they will find themselves being the victim even when they could have succeeded.

Feeling like a victim often starts early in life and maybe triggered by trauma.  As a child, some situations may be forced on you that are unfair, difficult, or harmful.  As an adult, a series of losses can lead to feeling like you have little control.resilience (2)

Lack of control is a hallmark of feeling like a victim. Victims believe they are powerless to change, improve, or overcome obstacles.

Victims feel helpless.  They often feel trapped by circumstances and believe they aren’t capable of overcoming their situation.  These feelings can cause a person to give up on themselves, their goals, and their performance.

Psychologists agree that believing you are a victim creates a cycle where your beliefs make you a victim over and over again.

According to Psychology Today, a leading group of psychologists and researchers, the beliefs a person has directly affect how they cope with challenges. These specialists have identified certain beliefs that lead to victim behavior.

  • Why try? I never win
  • Trust no one
  • I can’t
  • Everyone else is better than me
Why try? I never win

Everyone loses sometimes. Even a sports team with a perfect season rarely has more than one perfect season in a row.  In life, just like sports, you can lose sometimes and still win the overall prize in the end.  But if you let your losses overshadow your accomplishments, you can start to believe that your wins aren’t real or substantial.  When you see life as always loosing, it’s not worth trying for anything, and what you lose is the opportunity to win.

Trust no one

Victims don’t trust anyone. They believe that everyone else is against them and out to harm them.  Even innocent slights by others are perceived as intentional hurt.  While not everyone in life is willing to accept and help you, most people don’t spend all their time trying to hurt others.  Believing that you can’t trust anyone means that you will miss out on confiding and accepting help from people that could and would support you.  Without support, you remain a victim.

I Can’t

Feeling powerless robs you of control. If you believe that you don’t have control, you may start to feel like you are a victim.  “I can’t” becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Lack of commitment to change, refusal to learn and grow, and inability to accept mistakes as part of the path to success, all make it impossible to do something positive in your position.  It’s not that you can’t; it’s that you believe you can’t, so you don’t.

Everyone else is better than me

The powerless of believing you’re a victim elevates peers and co-workers above you. When you give others more control and power than you, you always remain a victim.  Believing everyone else is smarter, stronger, and more accomplished than you keep you from trying to improve and traps you as a victim.  Until you believe in yourself, you will always be a victim.

Work can be hard at times.  It’s possible to fail during the learning process and ultimately achieve goals.  But if you believe you are a victim of life, you always will be.  Letting others have power over you and giving up your control keeps you from the opportunities work offers to grow, change, and achieve.

Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need assistance recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in these challenging times, contact Flexicrew Today.

The Victim Mentality – Life Seems Unfair

Ongoing stress or a distressful situation can lead to the victim mentality. According to Healthline, a leading internet medical information provider, some people who experience ordeal may lose their sense of control over their lives and feel helpless when confronted with changes or challenges.  They feel trapped by circumstances that they think they have no control over and give up on being able to cope with or improve their situation.

People can be victims without developing the victim mentality.  When life seems unfair, or things don’t happen the way people want them to, most people adjust, adapt, and cope with their circumstances.  They make changes to improve themselves and their situation.

victim

People with the victim mentality are unable to make positive changes that help them control their circumstances. A person with the victim mentality always considers themselves a victim and behave as if they always will be the victim.  Even when they aren’t a victim, they refuse to see the difference between their perception of victimhood and reality.

Psychologists who study people’s reactions to disturbance believe the victim mentality is an acquired personality trait.  By thinking and acting as if they are always a victim, people’s personality becomes that of a victim no matter the circumstances.  The victim mentality includes thoughts and actions that keep people trapped as a victim.

Feeling Powerless

With the victim mentality, people feel powerless and unable to cope. They can’t find solutions for their problems because they don’t believe they have any power over themselves or their circumstances.  The victim mentality creates additional situations throughout life where people feel like victims because of the perception of powerlessness.

Feeling All Problems are Disasters

For people with the victim mentality, even small problems and challenges in life are perceived as significant disasters. They become upset and unreasonable when they feel the slightest thing is out of place or not up to their standards and expectations.  Because people with the victim mentality can’t find solutions, every problem they encounter feels like it’s unfixable and unending.

Thinking Others are Purposefully Trying to Cause Harm

Have you ever confronted someone about why they didn’t acknowledge you or do something to help you only to find that they were completely unaware of the situation? It’s easy to feel slighted when you think someone hasn’t responded to your needs, but the truth is they are often so wrapped up in their own lives; they aren’t fully aware of yours.

People with the victim mentality don’t see these types of situations as unintentional.  Instead, they believe other people are always out to hurt or harm them.  Because they don’t feel like they have control over their lives, they think that any lack of acknowledgment or help is a direct affront designed to hurt them.

Feeling Singled Out for Mistreatment

The victim mentality makes people feel that they are alone in their victimhood and receive worse treatment than others in the same situation. When a negative situation affects an entire group of people, they think that it’s harder and worse for them.  They may feel that they were included in the group only to make their lives worse, not because of circumstances but because they were singled out for mistreatment.

Being Unforgiving

When a situation is someone else’s fault, a person with the victim mentality refuses to forgive a sincerely offered apology or offers to make things right.  They may fear being hurt again by the same person.  They refuse to accept that others can make mistakes without malice or specific intent to harm them.

The victim mentality is a learned personality trait that results from not coping with and processing past distress. Because a person with the victim mentality can’t cope with challenges and problems, they feel they are always the victim of circumstances or other people’s intentional mistreatment.  The victim mentality makes people unable to take control of their lives and their responses to difficulty, keeping them always feeling like a victim.

Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need assistance recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in these challenging times, contact Flexicrew Today.