6 Skills a Warehouse Jobseeker Should Have

A warehouse jobseeker should be aware of the skills employers seek when applying for a job.  He will then increase his chances of getting the job offer. In the past year, the importance of warehouse jobs has increased, along with the number of jobs available. The warehouse jobseeker gets an edge over others applying for the same job when he knows in advance what is needed to complete the job.  A sharp warehouse jobseeker will highlight these skills on his resume and in an interview.

Warehouse jobseeker

Six of the most in demand skills for warehouse jobs are:

1.Skilled Communicator:

Every warehouse job wants candidates with good communication skills. Each employee must work with suppliers, co-workers, his supervisor or upper management. A warehouse employee should communicate clearly with all of them using phone, email and face-to-face.  Team members receiving the message must get it quickly without misunderstanding.

2. Teamwork:

In addition to communication, teamwork is also necessary. In the warehouse there is a lot of work which workers must do in a short period of time. Therefore, all the team members should complete  their portion of work assigned to them on time. So, it is important to get along with other team members in the warehouse and other related departments.

3. Time Management:

Warehouse employees are often given multiple tasks they have to complete the same day or sooner. Employers prefer to hire staff who can prioritize the work assigned to them. This will ensure that the tasks are completed before the specified deadline, so that the orders placed are delivered according to schedule, and the warehouse functions smoothly.

4. Understands Industry Specific Terms:

The warehouse jobseeker should spend some time to become familiar with warehouse specific terms before the interview.  Therefore, the employer will be convinced that he is genuinely interested in getting the job. This will also convince the business interviewer, that the warehouse jobseeker will quickly understand his responsibilities and work well with the rest of the team members. Those who have not held a warehouse job, can do some research online to become familiar with the frequently used terms. Doing so, will create the right impression on the employer, making it easier to be offered the job.

5. Technology Knowledgeable:

At present, warehouses use the latest technology to keep detailed records of the stock available and ensure that orders are delivered properly. So even for low level positions, the warehouse employees should have some IT and computer knowledge. Though the job applicant may not be a computer expert, he should be able to understand the features of new software being  used. Technical skills become more important for senior positions since new technologies are continually being used.  Decision makers and managers expect warehouse jobseekers to keep themselves updated with these latest technologies.

6. Fast, Accurate. Responsive:

Warehouses must deliver orders quickly with tight deadlines. Hence the warehouse jobseeker must complete his work quickly and ensure high quality. So, employers value completing high quality work fast as an important  skill in candidates.

To Sum Up

A job applicant’s resume should highlight the above 6 skills a warehouse requires to improve his chances of getting an interview and the job offer.

$1.9 Trillion American Rescue Plan Summary

The $1.9 trillion relief bill, known as the American Rescue Plan, has passed Congress and will head to President Joe Biden for a signature. Highlights of the bill include extended unemployment benefits, direct checks to individuals and more.

While some of the bill was changed during its time in the Senate, it’s largely similar to the initial version passed by the House. However, some key provisions, such as a higher minimum wage, were scrapped amid efforts to pass the bill swiftly.

This article defines the most relevant terms included in the bill.

Small Business Assistance

The bill invests billions toward small business assistance. Here is the current funding breakdown:

  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan program: $15 billion
  • New grant program for bars and restaurants, specifically: $28 billion
  • Paycheck Protection Program: $7.25 billion
Direct Payments

Just like the two other COVID-19 relief bills passed during the pandemic, this version also features direct payments to Americans. This time around, eligible recipients can expect $1,400 per person ($2,800 for couples), including adult dependentsa family of four could receive up to $5,600.

However, payment parameters are stricter this time around than with the previous direct payment. The full amount will go to individuals earning under $75,000 (or $150,000 for couples), with payments cut off entirely for individuals earning over $80,000 (or $160,000 for couples). Individuals earning an amount between those figures will receive a reduced sum.

Unemployment Aid

The bill extends two previously established pandemic unemployment assistance efforts: the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation program. Unemployed gig workers, freelancers, contractors and others who previously qualified for aid will continue to be eligible under these programs. The financial assistance provided by these two programs is currently set to expire in mid-March, which pressured legislators to act quickly.

The bill also provides for enhanced unemployment assistance payments of $300 per week. Under the bill, these programs and their financial aid are extended through Sept. 6.

Housing Assistance

The bill sets aside billions in financial aid to homeowners and renters. Here is the funding breakdown:

  • Aid for emergency rental assistance: $22 billion
  • Aid for mortgages, utilities and property taxes: $10 billion
  • Aid to states and localities to help individuals at risk of becoming homeless: $5 billion
Emergency Paid Leave

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), signed into law on March 18, 2020, required certain employers to provide employees with paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave for specified reasons related to COVID-19. That requirement expired Dec. 31, 2020.

The American Rescue Plan maintains the status quo, in that it does not require employers to offer leave under the FFCRA framework. However, the bill does provide tax credits for employers that voluntarily provide leave under the FFCRA framework through the end of September 2021.

Aid to Schools and Child Care

A significant portion of the relief bill involves aid to states, including schools and child care facilities:

  • Aid for getting K-12 schools ready for in-person learning: $125 billion
    • Money may be used for purchasing protective equipment, improving ventilation systems and hiring support staff, among other things. However, 20% of the money schools receive must be used to address pandemic learning loss—for example, extending learning time into the summer.
    • Aid carved out specifically for private schools: $2.75 billion
  • Aid for colleges: $40 billion
    •  Institutions will be required to spend at least 50% of their allocated funds on emergency financial aid grants to students.
  • Child care provider assistance: $39 billion
    • Funds may be used for payroll, rent, protective equipment and other expenses.
Tax Credits

The relief bill provides an overhaul of the child tax credit for the 2021 tax year. The bill increases the amount of the credit to $3,000 for each child under the age of 18 and $3,600 for children under the age of 6. The credit will also become fully refundable, meaning low-income individuals would receive the benefit.

The bill also expands the earned income tax credit for individuals without children. The maximum credit will be nearly tripled, and eligibility will be expanded as well.

Health Insurance

The bill subsidizes private health insurance premiums for unemployed workers through the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). The provision allows individuals eligible for COBRA insurance coverage to maintain their employer-sponsored coverage after losing employment without having to pay any portion of the premiums through the end of September 2021.

Additionally, the bill invests nearly $35 billion in premium subsidy increases for those who buy coverage on the ACA Marketplace. The bill increases the subsidies provided to currently eligible individuals, and removes the 400% federal poverty level cap (equal to approximately $51,000 for an individual) on subsidy eligibility.

Aid to States, Local Governments, Tribes and Territories

The bill provides billions in financial assistance to states, local governments, tribes and territories. Here is the current funding breakdown:

  • Aid to state and local governments: $325.5 billion
  • Aid to tribes and territories: $24.5 billion
  • Creation of the Coronavirus Capital Projects Fund, to carry out capital projects directly enabling work, education and health monitoring: $10 billion
What’s NOT in the Bill

A minimum wage hike to $15 per hour—one of the most discussed provisions from the initial bill—has been removed from the final version due to strict rules governing budget bills in the Senate. Some Democrats have suggested this provision may be considered as a standalone bill, but any movement on that front remains to be seen.

Additionally, the bill does not include an extension of the eviction moratorium, which is set to expire on March 31, or an expansion of mandated paid sick and family and medical leave. While neither were included in the original House bill, these were popular provisions contained within one of the previous bills.

Summary

While there are many complex provisions in this nearly $2 trillion relief bill, many legal and tax consultants are available to help employers make sense of everything. Please reach out with questions about how this new bill may affect your organization.  And if you need assistance with recruiting or flexible staffing support, please contact Flexicrew.

Come back again to this space to track Flexicrew’s Coronavirus efforts and information for your business and workforce.

This material has been prepared for informational purposes only, and is not intended to provide, and should not be relied on for, legal or tax advice. If you have any legal or tax questions regarding this content or related issues, then you should consult with your professional legal or tax advisor.

Ask the Flexpert…What Are Good Reasons Employers Should Hire Older Workers

Older Worker Discrimination

Is there bias against older workers? Certainly we in staffing agencies observe it to some degree. Yet this age discrimination remains hidden and tacit, it is unquestionable that it still exists and certainly it is upsetting.

Recruiting Attitude toward Older Workers

Employers, plus employment specialists and hiring managers within the organizations that have open jobs must show more innovation and be more imaginative in making use of candidates in all age brackets to accomplish more in the workplace. By disregarding or excluding the valuable experience and unique traits of our aging work force may bring about expertise gaps and missing skills in select industries and markets.

When recruiting older candidates, those doing the hiring should utilize a distinctive attitude and view these candidates with a creative point of view. On balance, older candidates offer a wide-ranging set of skills and experience to the workforce.

 

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Good Reasons Employers Should Hire Older Workers

Here are 10 good reasons employers should hire older workers and why they are good for business:

  1. It is not usually necessary to pay benefits like health care insurance.
  2. If an employer has a hiring freeze, hiring temporary older employees usually comes from a different budget.
  3. Older workers have a positive attitude.
  4. They have lower absenteeism and tend to be more punctual.
  5. Older workers have a better commitment to quality.
  6. Senior workers generally require less training.
  7. Older workers may possess superior customer service skills.
  8. Older temporary workers can be terminated at the end of a project with comparatively little or no cost.
  9. They often have better people skills.
  10. Older workers are more eager to learn new skills.

With these innate traits and benefits that we outlined, we hope you will give meaningful consideration to hiring older workers when you are trying to fill out your team. These individuals have many intangible skills that cannot be taught or trained which will positively enhance your workplace.

Need Assistance Hiring Older Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more mature workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew today.

Ask the Flexpert…How to Overcome the Employee Shortage?

Trouble Keeping up with the Demand?

Companies are increasing their need for high performing talent, but the supply of skilled candidates has diminished.  That makes it harder for employers to satisfy their needs.  The economy is hot and organizations want to participate.  But, how do they do that when they can’t find enough qualified workers?

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This has become a candidate-driven environment.  Nearly 40% of organizations couldn’t fill their job openings last month.

 

Some helpful hints to deal with this employee shortage are:

Extended Hiring Process

Reset your expectations that a longer hiring process is the new normal.  It’s been observed that open positions are remaining that way approximately one and a half months.  The time to fill a position has roughly doubled over the past 5 years.  So you must start your recruitment process earlier and pay particular attention to your job description and your company reputation.

Turnover

With more available positions and salaries finally starting to rise, employers can expect to see more turnover.  That will worsen the hiring crisis.  Higher performing workers have even more job opportunities available.  So, it’s vital for retention to support current employees’ desire for greater training and career development.   That shifts the discussion away from money and toward retention actions.

Counter Offer

If an employee plans to leave, the earlier you get this information the more time you have to consider whether or not to counter. The key is learning why the employee plans to quit.  Asking the employee if they would consider staying if those areas were improved could make a difference in retention versus back to hiring.

Dissatisfaction causes a worker’s choice to jump ship. In this candidate-shortage environment we advise finding out your top employees dissatisfaction points and presenting them with a counter offer.  Your plan is to persuade them to remain with your firm and for you to avoid the cost and hassle of going the new hire route.

Compensation

Higher wages in your new hire offer is an obvious answer, though painful. But a competitive compensation package can be the solution. Be sure to research what your industry is paying for certain experience, skills, and positions. You can tweak that to make sure you have a solid offer. If a high-performing candidate already has a firm offer from a competitor, consider the components of the offer and make your offer addresses learning, company culture and career advancement as your response.

Reputation

In the past, there were fewer employment opportunities and more competition for jobs. An organization could list their job opening on its website and multiple qualified applicants would respond. Today, candidates aren’t necessarily proactively seeking new opportunities. But, if an employee recognizes your firm and it has a good reputation then they’re more likely to respond to your job post. So, actions to strengthen your company name and differentiate your firm become an asset in this tight labor market.

There are many other ways to deal with a worker shortage.  If you need some assistance in surviving and thriving with recruitment in this tight labor market, contact Flexicrew today.

Ask the Flexpert…Why Are Employers Struggling to Find Workers

Employment experts confirm employers are having a difficult time recruiting qualified employees to fill vacant positions.

It’s a very tight market.  There are more job openings available than trained and experienced individuals to fill them.

Employers are also trying to find applicants from a smaller pool of potential candidates. The unemployment rate was 3.5% in September 2019, according to the most recent figures. The workforce has been the number-one issue facing businesses in the last few years.

Since more people have jobs, less people are looking for work.  Candidates today have many options in multiple industries.

Firms struggle to find qualified workers with the skills necessary for the available jobs, and the most difficult jobs to fill seem to be technical skills positions, transportation jobs, and middle management.

The construction industry especially has complained about a shortage of experienced workers. In a survey by the Association of General Contractors, 78 percent of respondents said they were having a hard time finding qualified workers.

Symptoms of the problem
  1. Job applicants don’t show up for scheduled interviews
  2. Online openings will receive a lot of applications, but those applicants aren’t dedicated to the hiring process
  3. Applicants often won’t respond when employers reach out to them
  4. Struggle to find workers willing to do entry-level or hard work.
Problems for Employers
  • Hiring difficulties have increased causing firms to forgo new business opportunities
  • When short-handed, employees work longer shifts, making them more tired, so their attitudes might not be as appealing.
  • Some organizations haven’t started new projects for lack or talent
  • Projects have been delayed due to lack of people to complete the project
  • Retention is harder for businesses because employees have more employment options.

This is not ‘your father’s recruiting environment.’  It isn’t effective to use just one recruitment strategy anymore. Recruiters really have to be going at it in a number of ways and have had to adapt to this changing job market.

Employers Using Different Approaches to Make Their Jobs More Appealing

They have:

  • Adopted more flexible employee scheduling to be more appealing
  • Have tried to recruit to ‘nontraditional workers,’ including semiretired workers, retirees, etc. to fill entry-level jobs
  • More and more redoubled efforts to attract young people to apprenticeships
  • Some have raised pay, added vacation days and offered hiring and longevity bonuses
  • Broadened ties with local vocational institutions, expanding skilled apprenticeship programs
  • Gone regional or national with recruiting efforts that formerly stayed close to home
  • Aging or discouraged workers are being drawn back into the workforce
  • More employers start hiring people with a non-violent criminal history so the candidate field opens up

Candidates don’t necessarily need experience because the company will now provide training.

It’s becoming more common for businesses to reach out to recruiting agencies for assistance finding people to fill entry-level and upper-level positions. At Flexicrew, our clients are counting on us to do the leg work to find the skills they can’t find or don’t have time to search for.

There had been such a big push for a college education in past years that schools placed less emphasis on skilled trades. Now, Public Schools and other area districts are building their career technical education and employers are accommodating more on-the-job training

Conclusion

If things seem bleak now, a Washington Post article states that tight labor markets are likely to persist. Over the next decade, as the baby boomers retire, the labor force will expand by 0.5 percent annually, roughly one-third as fast as it did between 1950 and 2016, predicted the Congressional Budget Office.