The Connection Between Self-Control and Resilience

Self-control is crucial to coping with work’s challenges and being a resilient employee. No matter what the circumstances are, a employees can control only their own actions and reactions to a situation.  How they act and react to obstacles builds their resilience, and those actions and reactions are based on the level of self-control they have.

resilience

Resilient Self-Control Actions

Psychologists have identified the positive coping skills a person needs to be resilient. When life is difficult, resilient people take action to improve their situation.  They know they need to control their:

Making plans is a positive coping skill that allows your staff to take control of their success.  Self-control builds when the staff commit to your plans.  Employees who work toward their goals cope with obstacles by growing, adapting, and staying focused on their goals.  The self-control needed to carry out a plan builds resilience against difficulties and distractions.

Resilient workers also have goals.  Instead of allowing challenges to overwhelm them and struggling with negative outcomes, resilient workers have goals that they perform hard tasks to achieve.  They recover from setbacks because they are focused on and committed to their goals.  A work team without goals often find themselves without a clear direction, because they don’t have the self-control to work toward their success.

Physical health is essential to resilience because it provides a positive way to cope with stress.  Exercise, a healthy diet, and getting enough sleep all contribute to good health.  A healthy lifestyle requires self-control.  Every worker needs to have the self-control to stick to an exercise plan, commit to healthy eating, and find time for adequate rest.

Because a resilient employee has self-control, they understand that reaching their goals can take time.  It can be hard to wait for the fulfillment that arises from of achieving goals, but self-control allows employees to stay focused and follow their plan despite distractions or the immediate satisfaction from doing something else.  Being patient makes your employees more resilient when they face obstacles because they know it may take time to overcome them.

Resilient Self-Control Reactions

When faced with a challenge or a situation your workforce doesn’t like, being resilient also involves how they react to those stresses. Life coaches teach that a worker’s reactions are under his or her own control.  Learning how to respond positively includes:

  • Self-esteem
  • Avoiding Overreaction
  • Facing Problems
  • Humor

Self-esteem is essential to resilience.  Workers who believe that their supervisor or their employer is giving them a raw deal, and that others are always trying to hurt them do not have the resilience to cope well with life’s challenges.  Self-esteem requires self-control by not reacting poorly to less than ideal situations.  Instead, resilient employees use their goals and plan to work through difficulties and don’t let their self-esteem suffer from other’s opinions.

When a resilient person fails, they understand they have control over making changes and trying again to reach their goal. They don’t blame their failure on outside forces and think they can’t make the changes needed to achieve.

Self-control plays a role in avoiding overreaction too.  When a worker overacts, they often lose their focus on their goals because of their immediate emotional reaction.  While everyone gets upset, angry, and sad from time to time, overacting is a sign that a worker doesn’t have self-control or resilience.

Resilient workers face their problems with a plan, a goal, and a commitment to overcome them.  Those who aren’t resilient avoid dealing with their problems and often use unhealthy coping mechanisms like alcohol and other drugs to lessen their disappointment and pain.  Workers need self-control to choose a positive way to cope with challenges and be resilient when faced with difficulties.

Humor is an important skill that helps your employees be resilient.  Being able to accept difficulties and setbacks by finding the humor in situations lessens stress.  Self-control allows your employees to let go of negative feelings and laugh when things don’t go as planned.  Resilience includes moving past the difficulty and finding a new way to reach goals.

Resilience is based on the control of your actions and reactions to challenges. Successfully overcoming a challenge increases self-control, helps employees learn and grow, and builds resilience.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

10 Essential Traits to Create Resilience

Resilience speaks to one’s ability to bounce back from difficulties and catastrophes experienced in life. Resilience is essential to navigating life because adversity and challenges are inevitable. While there are a variety of things related to resilience, the following is a list of resilience power traits. Each of these traits is linked to the development of resilience, which ultimately equates to the ability to handle adversity with grace.Resilience-in-the-workplace-1

1. Acceptance

Adversity is inevitable, so learning to accept and embrace it is essential to developing resilience and navigating challenges well. Those who are resilient accept difficulties as normal and spend their time and energy learning to adapt to the adversity rather than fighting it or running from it. The choice to lean into the discomfort and embrace it ultimately helps employees better deal with and bounce back from the hardships they face (Waters, 2013).

2. Adaptability

The ability to be able to adjust and shift as the pandemic creates new circumstances and increases challenges is a key facet of resilience. Those employees who are resilient can develop numerous strategies from dealing with stressful situations. This flexibility in the way they think about challenges allows them to respond flexibly with regards to their emotion. Thus, they are better able to shift from one coping strategy to another depending upon what is best given the specific set of circumstances (Barker, 2016).

3. Awareness

Awareness is also heavily tied to the development of resilience. Awareness helps individual personnel understand what they need, how they feel, when they need to reach out for help, and when they need to make adjustments and improvements. Being aware of what personal adjustments need to be made to one’s staff members or their situation helps your staff gain the knowledge and information needed to best approach and navigate the challenge at hand (Waters, 2013).

4. Boundaries

Boundaries in the context of adversity relate to one’s ability to create distinction between who they are at their core and the cause of their current negative circumstances. This means being able to understand that the adversity currently being faced is temporary.

This also means refraining from allowing the negative situation or circumstance to become one’s permanent identity. Being able to set these boundaries aids in quick recovery from trials because individuals understand that their situation will eventually change for the better, and there is the understanding that their identity is not rooted in the trauma. Thus, there is an ability to approach the challenge with a more positive attitude, and less likelihood of allowing the challenge to define one’s self (Waters, 2013).

5. Confidence

A key to learning to cope with the stresses of life is a belief in your ability to do so. Research shows that there is a link between one’s self-esteem and one’s ability to handle stress and recover from negative events. Employees who lack self-esteem have a tendency to approach negative events with a negative outlook, and in general, have more negative outcomes. On the other hand, those who possess high levels of confidence in themselves and their abilities, approach negative circumstances with the belief that they possess what is necessary to overcome the circumstance. Thus, their outcomes tend to be more favorable (Cherry, 2020).

6. Goals

Goal setting and resilience are linked for workers in the sense that setting goals help breakdown challenges and hardships into more manageable parts that can be tackled and conquered. Goals allow challenges to be addressed in a realistic manner while also helping people to manage their emotional response to a given situation. When a person can tackle a situation one step at a time, there is less anxiety, less stress, and more probability of a favorable outcome. This ultimately means a better ability to bounce back from adversity (Cherry, 2020).

7. Optimism

Optimism is the ability to look at situations and circumstances and find the positives, even in the midst of what seems like endless negatives. The ability to approach hardships with this type of positive attitude is key to being able to quickly recover from the difficulties your workers face.  You should support positivity in your workforce by creating and sustaining intentional employee reward and recognition programs.

True optimism isn’t about ignoring the negatives, but rather paying attention to those negatives that are relevant to the problems they face and then actively choosing not to remain focused on those negative solely or long term. A truly optimistic workforce that is able to foster resilience learn how to balance a positive outlook with a realistic view of the world and that helps them bounce back from challenges faced (Barker, 2016).

8. Problem-Solving

There is research that suggests workers who know how to analyze and develop solutions for problems are better able to cope with challenges as compared to those who do not know how to do those things. Being faced with a challenge creates an opportunity for workers in your employ to perform and on-the-job learning that will help them develop potential solutions for the issue at hand.

It is that regular and consistent work of engaging in exercises that build focus and encourages non-traditional thinking that better helps employees to able be able to solve problems in future scenarios (Cherry, 2020).

9. Purpose

Helping your work teams find or create a sense of purpose for themselves in the midst of adversity or crisis can significantly help when it comes to coping and recovery. Developing a ‘why’ becomes the motivation needed to do the work that will help them get through the crisis. It is the purpose that makes the work of fighting through the trouble worthwhile and sustains their ability to continue moving forward to overcome adversity (Cherry, 2020).

10. Support

Having a support system in place when faced with difficulties is essential to building resilience. The emotional support offered by having additional associates help carry the load of mental/emotional burdens can make the adversity more manageable and easier to navigate.

Additionally, other workers or mentors can remind workers of their abilities and strengths which may help tap into the skills and inner strength they need to persevere. The support of others can also offer practical physical support and provision of resources and information that will aid you in overcoming the challenges they face (Barker, 2016).

Resilience is linked to so many other useful traits and qualities. In fostering resilience, one is able to foster the 10 traits mentioned in this article, and that in turn subsequently strengthens resilience.

Thus, an emphasis on continued growth within your company in any of these areas is sure to result in improved resilience bringing in a better ability to navigate through day-to-day work challenges.

References:

Barker, E. (2016, April 26). 10 ways to boost your emotional resilience, backed by research. Time. https://time.com/4306492/boost-emotional-resilience/

Cherry, K. (2020, January). Use these 10 tips to improve your resilience. Verywell Mind. https://www.verywellmind.com/ways-to-become-more-resilient-2795063

Waters, B. (2013, May 21). 10 traits of emotionally resilient people. Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/design-your-path/201305/10-traits-emotionally-resilient-people

The Connection between Patience and Resilience

It doesn’t seem obviously apparent, but there is a connection between patience and resilience. Patience can be defined as the capacity to accept or tolerate delay, trouble, or suffering without getting angry or upset. Resilience is their ability to recover quickly from difficulties and challenges we encounter.

Sea Kayak

So what’s the link?

Patience is a marker of resilience.

The more we are able to tolerate and withstand circumstances in their lives without an angry response, the more indicative that is of their ability to endure tough circumstances and recover from them with speed and ease (Sood, 2019). Thus, taking the time to strengthen one’s patience skills subsequently strengthens one’s resilience.

How to Cultivate Patience in the Workplace

Since patience is so critical to the development of resilience, it’s important to pursue opportunities to train your workforce to increase their patience. There are many ways to cultivate patience in their daily routines. The following outlines a few key techniques for developing and implementing patience into their work habits on a consistent basis.

  1. Wait: This may seem like a common-sense solution or it may seem counterintuitive (or even childish), but the practice of making yourself wait actually does develop patience over time. Much like their physical muscles, patience is a mental/emotional muscle that when worked will get stronger. By making your staff wait they demonstrate to you that they are able to endure without being reactive (Power, 2017). This practice can begin by making them wait just a few minutes and over time gradually increased to making them wait a few weeks, months, or even years.
  2. Embrace the Discomfort: Let’s face it- there is nothing comfortable about waiting. The typical response to discomfort is to run from it or try to avoid it. However, choosing to embrace the discomfort is where the real growth comes from. Learning to embrace the discomfort that waiting brings and become more comfortable with the uncomfortable is actually a strong way to build patience and endurance according to therapist Jane Bolton, Psy.D. (Holmes, 2017).
  3. Reframing: Often the root of impatience is the focus on what your workers don’t presently have. Reframing is the practice of intentionally changing the way a situation is viewed. When you reframe situations to shift from what they are lacking to focus on another aspect of the situation, such as how the waiting is stretching them and challenging us for the better, then they are put in a position where they are better able to wait and build patience. As a result, their increased patience leads to increased resilience (DiGiulio, 2019).
  4. Calming Techniques: When all else seems to fail, resorting to the use of calming techniques can be a great way to help increase their patience. These techniques can include breathing, meditation, walking, or other similar methods. The goal of these methods is to engage in a practice that helps them to cope with feelings of anxiety or anger caused by impatience (Power, 2017). By learning to implement a calming technique at the onset of feelings of stress, you enhance their ability to become more tolerant and thus become more resilient.

Ultimately, those who are able to cultivate more patience will be better equipped to be more resilient. In learning to deal with their somewhat innate desire to be instantly gratified and the feelings of anxiety and anger that can often accompany waiting, they learn to become more tolerant and endure more things that are challenging and unpleasant.

This, therefore, sets the stage for someone to quickly recover from hardships and cope with unpleasantries in a healthy manner. With this in mind, you should make it a goal to find ways to increase your workforce’ patience so that they can become more resilient in their daily work activities.

References:

DiGiulio, S. (2019, July 9). How to train yourself to be more patient. Retrieved from https://www.nbcnews.com/better/lifestyle/how-train-yourself-be-more-patient-ncna1022356

Holmes, L. (2017, December 7). 5 tricks to becoming a more patient person. Retrieved from https://www.huffpost.com/entry/patience-tips_n_5843928

Power, R. (2017, October 24). 4 tips to help you be a more patient person, science says you will be happier. Retrieved from https://www.inc.com/rhett-power/4-tips-to-help-you-be-a-more-patient-person-science-says-you-will-be-happier.html

Sood, A. (2019, September 17). The essential skills that boost resilience | Everyday health. Retrieved from https://www.everydayhealth.com/wellness/resilience/essential-skills-that-make-you-resilient/

The Connection between Great Problem Solving Skills and Resilience

Resilience speaks to our ability to recover quickly from hardships that we experience. Having strong problem-solving skills speaks to our ability to look at problems comprehensively, break them down into pieces, and find applicable solutions for them in a timely matter.

Problem-Solving Involves the following Five Steps (Lawrence, 2019):
  1. Identifying the problem
  2. Breaking the problem into more manageable part
  3. Generating possible solutions
  4. Evaluating possible solutions for viability and selecting the most appropriate option to apply to the problem
  5. Monitoring the results of the applied solution and generating and applying a new solution if necessaryConnected
Applying to the Workforce

The link between the two is that a person with strong problem-solving skills becomes a person who is more resilient. This is because the better we are at evaluating and solving the problems that arise in our lives, the quicker we can recover from the issues we face. The ability to problem-solve helps us to quickly transition out of our circumstances and onto growth (Lawrence, 2019).

How to Develop Strong Problem-Solving Skills

In order to become more resilient, we must learn to strengthen our problem-solving skills so we can better deal with obstacles we may face. The following are ways to develop problem-solving skills in our lives.

  • Ask Questions

Asking questions is one of the best ways to develop strong problem-solving skills because asking questions gets you to begin thinking critically. It is via critical thinking and asking analytical questions that one can truly get to the bottom of problems and begin developing solutions (B, 2020). Asking questions also ensures that the problem is accurately defined so that the correct issue can be addressed.

  • Gather Information

It can be easy to assume we already have what we need or know all we need to solve problems and challenges that arise in our lives. However, that often fails to be true and leaves us ill-prepared and ill-informed. This means taking the time to consult additional persons and sources for information so that a strong foundation is laid for the problem to be accurately defined and then solved (Talwar, 2019).

  • Flexibility & Adaptability

The ability to be flexible is an important skill to possess when it comes to problem-solving because many problems often require pivoting when it comes to the application stage. This means that as possible solutions are being weighed an even applied one may realize that selected options are not viable and need to go with other options to more effectively solve those problems (Talwar, 2019).

  • Approach with Positivity

Often, we approach problems with apprehension and negativity which hinder our ability to clearly and open-mindedly address an issue. When we have a positive outlook we can approach issues with optimism, which makes us more likely to actually find a viable solution. Believing that a challenge is an opportunity for growth and that a positive outcome can be achieved sets the tone for the ultimate outcome (B, 2020).

When we are people who are better equipped to solve problems, we become people who are also more resilient. Having the skills we need to analyze issues, generate possible options, and apply solutions also helps us build the same skills that help us become more tolerant of difficulties and recover from the difficulties we face with speed.

Thus, active pursuit of activities and opportunities that will allow us to practice asking more questions, gathering information, being flexible, and approaching problems with positivity will help build better problem-solving skills and therefore enhance our resilience.

References:

B, Z. (2020, May 12). 6 ways to enhance your problem-solving skills effectively. Retrieved from https://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/6-ways-to-enhance-your-problem-solving-skills.html

Lawrence, J. (2019, December 23). Resilience skills: 5 steps to effective problem-solving. Retrieved from https://in-equilibrium.co.uk/5-steps-to-effective-problem-solving/

Talwar, M. (2019, February 19). 5 ways to improve your problem-solving skills. Retrieved from https://social.hays.com/2017/08/16/5-ways-improve-problem-solving-skills/

What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger and Resilient

Resilience. This ability has risen to the forefront and become a more prominent topic of discussion particularly over the course of 2020 for most of us, but even before that in recent times due to natural disasters, market forces and technological change. It has been recognized as a concept that can be applied in all facets of your life, including personal and professional – at home and in the workplace. It greatly strengthens your ability to cope with threats, whether they are anticipated or unforeseen.

Resilience is complex; it’s a multifaceted idea that can be useful for dealing with stress, risk, shock, and environmental changes. Often, resilience is posed as the opposite of vulnerability. That’s a simplistic view, seeing as they are relative terms. However, just as you have certain vulnerabilities, you can build resilience to them. In a way, they do absolutely go hand-in-hand.

Workplace Resilience

Resilience is heavily related to capacity. It’s a broad concept that stretches far beyond plans, resources, and actions. You may find that some people use capacity and resilience interchangeably.

Let’s clarify this now. Resilience is two-pronged – a desired outcome and the process resulting in that outcome. For example, you want to build a safe, resilient workplace and in order to achieve that end, you have to enable people and empower the workforce to adapt and show them how to become more resilient.

What – Defining Resilience

First and foremost, resilience is a skill, and not a trait. This is great news because it means anyone can build resilience; you don’t have to be born with it.

If you type resilience definition into your search engine, you will likely find a series of answers. It means a lot of different things in many different contexts.

However, the straightforward definition is this – the ability to anticipate, absorb, and accommodate/recover from an unsettling event or ongoing situation in a timely fashion and efficiently. This may include preserving, restoring, or improving existing situations, structures, or functions.

You can see from that description, that the word resilience can be applied to more than just individuals. It can be applied to corporations, communities, and even processes. However, our focus is on individual workers. To break it down to its base level – resilience is the ability to bounce back. Let’s break it down further.

Context

This is the person, system, or process that is facing interruption. The resilience of what?

Challenge

This is the dire situation, the shock or stressor. The resilience to what?

Capacity to Cope

This includes peoples’ exposure to an issue, their sensitivity to it, and their capacity to adapt.

Reaction

Your work team’s (or your) reaction to the disturbance is the impulse to survive and cope, to recover and learn, and to transform. Your capacity to deal with an issue forms your reaction to it – it influences your ability to bounce back.

Further Details

The COVID pandemic has brought about radical change in the work environment and increased the need for greater resilience for companies and their employees to cope and even thrive when faced with monumental levels of stress.

Flexicrew has faced and faced-down our stressors and have observed clients, leaders, workers and candidates who have dealt with difficult current circumstances and either persevered or didn’t have the capacity to cope.

Over the next month we will explore this concept of resilience and identify tools to improve your resilience and that of your peers and personnel.

Increased Resilience Offsets Rising Workplace Pressure

Resilience in the Face of Rising Workplace Pressures

Resilience in the work environment is being discussed more often these days and in the headlines more frequently.  Due to Coronavirus plus improving technology, rapid change and disruption, many organizations have a work environment with urgent deadlines.  Here employees have to work under great pressure to deliver the work in less time. Employees are expected to ensure that their work is of high quality to help their employer become the market leaders. They should be aware of the latest trends and adapt to them, manage more effectively and work harder to deliver better results.

workplace stress collage

For the current business conditions it is necessary for teams and their leaders to be more sensitive and respond quickly to the desires and requirements of their customers. They should also be able to deal with failure, rejection and new challenges effectively.

Stress Reduction vs. Employee Resilience

If a business wishes to retain its edge under these conditions, it should be able to innovate. The leaders should take the initiative personally and work harder without adversely affecting their health or that of their team. Being resilient can greatly help a business and its management succeed in the current business situation. To make the work environment more resilient, instead of focusing on stress reduction, which many organizations are trying, it is advisable to lead teams more effectively and help build team and individual resilience.

Tips for Building Resilience

Some tips which will help make the members of the team at the workplace more resilient are listed below:

  • Only focusing on doing the work without thinking or planning can lead to over-working and fatigue
  • Identify what causes stress which makes it difficult for employees to focus on their work. The leaders should understand how the increase in the work output expected, change in the pace or rate of doing work will affect employees’ concentration
  • The team should be able to adapt to changing conditions to remain relevant. The work which a team member was doing to-date, is likely to change in the next five years, so that they remain useful for the business. The employee should be willing to adapt to the change in work profile and also improve his skills to adapt to changing work requirements
  • Employees should be open to feedback and use it constructively to improve performance
  • It is important to accept failure and use it learn and grow when there is more pressure. If the team is discouraged by failure, it will not innovate to prevent further failure, and this will adversely affect growth.

At a time when there is a lot of uncertainty and hardship in the economy, it is important to ensure that all the team members feel that they are working together, their concerns and heard by the team leaders who understand them and will help resolving issues. This will help a business achieve its goals of productivity which are linked to employee well being and performance.

Below are some resources available to help workers dealing with work or personal anxiety or stress and help build resilience.

Resources

If the pandemic is taking a toll on your team’s mental health (or your own), know that you’re not alone. CNN identifies some resources that can help those in the United States:

  • The Crisis Text Line is available by texting 741741. Trained volunteers and crisis counselors are staffed 24/7, and the service is free.
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to disasters. Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to connect with a trained crisis counselor.
  • For the Frontlines offers health care professionals and essential workers free 24/7 crisis counseling and support for workers dealing with stress, anxiety, fear or isolation related to Coronavirus.
Additional Resources

For more support, check out CNN’s guide to giving and getting help during the pandemic.

For more information on resilience, check Flexicrew online or connect with a Flexicrew professional 866.720.FLEX (3539).

Staying Centered and Calm amid Coronavirus: Positive at-home Actions to Begin Today

Introduction

This article is a bit different from the topics we choose to write about.  But since a long weekend is approaching for some and there could be more time spent in homes, we thought it was appropriate at this time to address the subject of anxiety, unease and maybe occasional panic in these uncertain and chaotic times.  We provide just a few reflections on taking care of yourself to have a good work-life balance to stay centered.

Reaction to Coronavirus

As COVID-19 continues to make its way into cities, suburbs and rural areas across the nation, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult to remain calm and not panic.

Authorities have told us to say in our homes in order to prevent spread, but that does not mean that we should go crazy inside and solely focus our attention on what is happening with the world outside. Try to limit how much news you watch, especially some of the over-hyped reporting that only propagates fear and anxiety. First and foremost, get updates and facts from reliable sources, and then focus your attention elsewhere.

You can avoid contact with other people and wash your hands more carefully, but your ability to remain calm comes from within. That means you’ll have to take the necessary steps in reducing your stress and anxiety and promoting calmness while the virus runs its course.

leaves falling calm

We’re going to go over three of the best ways that you can stay calm and centered in times of COVID-19 stress!

Mindfulness & Meditation

So, you’re anxious and stressed as a result of the rapid spread of Coronavirus. If you’ve never attempted meditation or any mindfulness techniques in the past, this is the perfect time to try them out and get some practice under your belt.

According to the Mayo Clinic, meditation can play a huge role in helping you to maintain your mental and emotional health, even benefiting aspects of your physical health. Here’s what meditation can do for you.

  • Greater outlook on life (positivity)
  • Increased feelings of calmness
  • Greater self-awareness
  • Reduced levels of anxiety and stress.
  • Improved focus

The best part is: There are plenty of different types of meditation.

If you’re able to focus for long periods of time, you might want to try out guided meditations or visualization techniques. When you’re looking to stay more active while you’re quarantined, you can give yoga or Pilates a go!

Draw on a Creative Outlet

You might be stuck in the house for the next few weeks, but that doesn’t mean you have to resort to going stir crazy. In fact, that’ll probably only increase your feelings of panic during such trying times!

This is a great time to try out some new (or old) creative hobbies. When you’re focused on building or creating something new, you’re reducing the amount of focus on the negativity surrounding you. That means creativity is a solid way of helping you to relax.

A creative outlet can be almost anything. Here are a few things you might want to try out.

  • Painting, coloring, or drawing
  • Singing or playing musical instruments
  • Taking photos or videos of things you enjoy
  • Building something with things lying around the house
  • Writing
  • Puzzles
  • Reading something and then writing an essay about it (yes, remember English 101 class?). This is a great way to take your mind off the world’s troubles.

Basically, the goal here is to find an activity or task that requires focus and makes you happy. You won’t even notice that you spent the last hour drawing your favorite cartoon character.

Giving Back & Helping Others

It’s completely natural to be fearful of the unknown, but giving back to others can help you to tackle this fear. When you’re giving back to the community or helping those in need, you’ll be working to spread compassion and happiness rather than fear and anxiety.  It will certainly ‘give back’ to you in multiple, subtle ways.

With so many people sick or self-quarantined, many people aren’t able or fear to  to leave the home. However, these individuals do still have needs that they now can’t meet on their own.

As long as you’re keeping your distance and not exposing anyone to the virus, you can deliver food and groceries or do things like their yard work. It’ll make you feel good about yourself while also helping those who need it! So, call your neighbors, post something on your Facebook to let those in need know you are available and how to get in contact.

Final Thoughts

You can’t do anything yourself when it comes to curing or eliminating COVID-19, but there are things you can do that can reduce your unease and invoke an overwhelming sense of calmness.

By taking advantage of mindfulness, looking for a creative outlet, or giving back to those who need it, you’ll be able to stay calm and centered, even now!

To help you stay calm and centered at work, Flexicrew can assist you with workforce planning and recruiting the quality talent that you need during recession.  Contact one of our workforce professionals Today!

And, by the way, have a happy, calm Labor Day.