7 Natural Ways to Boost Your Memory Starting Today

How to Boost Your Memory Starting Today

The day is half over, and you can’t get over the feeling that you’ve forgotten something important. You check your calendar, but whatever it is, it was never written down. Now you’re stuck, and you can’t remember what it was.

There’s nothing more frustrating than forgetting. The fact is, we get so busy that it’s very hard to keep track of all your work assignments you need to get through a day.

Or is it?

Boost your memory starting today

Thankfully there are natural things we can do to boost our memory. And we don’t have to wait to get started. Below you’ll find several suggestions to help you boost your memory right now!

1.Meditate

All day long you’re trying to absorb information. Is it any wonder your brain gets to the point where it can’t hold in another fact? Meditation gives you time to process, and recharge. What’s more, meditation improves your focus, so when it’s time to go back to work, you’re ready for it.

2. Eat Better

Some things we eat are called brain foods. Anything with antioxidants will improve brain function, which in turns makes for a better memory!

3. Get Up and Move

Exercise increases blood flow. Better blood flow carries more of what your brain needs to function (such as oxygen and nutrients). So movement = better memory!

4. Try a Brain Teaser

Regularly challenging your brain is good for it! By doing things such as crossword puzzles or Sudoku, you start building better networks for the neural pathways. There are tons of apps out there filled with all kinds of mental challenges designed to enhance your memory. So, why not play a game that gives a real positive boost to your brainpower?

5. Take a Break

Brains need rest periods too. If you’re finding that you’re losing focus while working, it’s probably time to take a short break. That gives your brain a chance to process and re-energize.

6. Learn Something New

By learning new things, you train your brain to process information better, and so you will start remembering more. Picking up a new skill will result in you helping your memory as well!

7. Sleep

It’s a fact of life that a tired brain isn’t going to be working at its very best. Getting enough sleep is probably the simplest thing you can do to improve your memory. By getting 7 – 9 hours of sleep every night, you’ll find your memory will improve dramatically.

Wrapping Up

To boost your memory starting today doesn’t have to take a lot of time or even forced attention. Use his list and you’ll find that your memory will improve dramatically in just a short time.  All without having to resort to great big crazy changes in your life. How easy is that?

 

 

3 Ways to Work Smarter Not Harder Now

How to Work Smarter Not Harder

There are a few keys that help you work smarter not harder.  Everyone knows any approaches that will give you rewards at work are going to require a little hard work. But this doesn’t always mean you have to work yourself to the point where you are really exhausted and barely able to stay awake.  You need to tackle activities in a more productive way.

How to work smarter not harder to enhance productivity

High achievers work hard, but they also find ways to work smarter and not harder.

1.Prioritize

Even if everything you have to do seems equally important, there are bound to be some assignments that can wait a few hours or days to complete. You need to review your to-do list of can’t-wait activities and complete them first. This way, you will complete the things that are important ahead of the deadline. You won’t need to rush last-minute because you did less important assignments first.

2. Delegate

Don’t be afraid to hand off to a subordinate who can do your basic tasks. Sometimes this is not easy, especially if you are the type of person who doesn’t like to relinquish control or feels that you can accomplish tasks better than anyone. It is well worth it, though. When you delegate tasks that take up your time and energy for little to no return, you will have time to work on more important projects that offer higher returns. Note that you can do this both in your professional and personal life. In your professional life, you can hire an assistant to file paperwork or make routine phone calls. In your personal life, you could hire someone to do your cleaning and laundry.

3. Batch Similar Tasks

This tip is probably the hardest one on the list, and it may not work for all tasks, but you should try to batch tasks which are similar and get them all done at once.

For example, if you have to respond to emails, respond to all of your emails at the same time. If you need to make phone calls, sit and make all the calls at once. This behavior can save you lots of time. Since you are already set up to complete one of the tasks, completing more won’t require a new setup.

Working smarter, not harder, may seem difficult, but you can quickly increase your productivity if you know what you are doing. All it takes is some prioritizing, delegating, and grouping similar tasks together. Soon, you will have everything you need to get done finished in no time at all, and with much less effort on your end!

Work Through an Industrial Specialist  Staffing Agency

If your industrial industry career has come to a standstill with your current employer, it may be time to search for something better. Connect with a staffing agency specializing in industrial jobs, like Flexicrew.  We can help you discover and get hired to a position with the growth and development you want.   The neat thing is that specialist staffing agencies have multiple industry contacts. We can put you forward for industrial jobs you couldn’t find on your own.  Often, we are aware of positions even before they hit the market. This builds and delivers you a host of opportunity.

Flexicrew Advisors

We as specialist recruiters also often have good working relationships with the employers they represent. We understand each of our client’s needs and can advise on what roles will best suit your skills. Kind of like putting together the pieces of a puzzle that fit together.  Also we have our finger on the pulse of the industry.  A specialist recruiter like Flexicrew can also advise you on the training you need to take to enhance your desirability as a candidate for industrial jobs.

Contact Flexicrew today to see what our recruiting specialists have to offer you.  They can show you some simple tricks to work smarter not harder.

Organization Leads to Better Productivity

If you’re struggling to be productive, it could be a lack of organization at the root of the problem.  For some people organization comes naturally, but for most people it requires some energy to learn organization skills. organization leads to better productivity

And even if you’re not inherently organized, there are many things you can do to improve your organization one step at a time.

Clean Your Work Area

If your work area looks like it was the victim of a recent natural disaster, your productivity will suffer.  The first step toward better organization is cleaning your work area.

This means organizing papers in file folders or binders, designating storage spaces for workplace supplies, and throwing away materials that are duplicates or that you no longer need.

Computer and Email Organization

Do you use a computer or the internet in your work?  If your computer desktop has fifty icons on it and your email list has hundreds of emails, it’s time to clean those areas.  Make sure that you store all important documents in logical folders and remove any unused icons from your desktop.

Spend a day organizing email so that deleted unimportant emails are and important emails are organized into folders so you can refer to them when you need them.  If you have unread mail, read it.

Use a Planner

Productive people plan each day with purpose.  Using a daily planner – either on paper or electronically – can help you to stay on track and become more productive.  It’s best to plan the next day’s work at the end of your work day so that you can begin fresh the next day and know what needs to be done first.

Focus Your Efforts

Instead of worrying about trying to do everything at once, learn to focus instead of multi-tasking.  Set a designated time or times each day to read email, respond to voicemail, and work on social media.  The rest of your day should be spent on more important tasks.

Don’t Procrastinate

Sometimes it’s tempting to put off tasks that are less desirable.  But all this does is get you behind schedule and put off the inevitable.  When you need to do something, just use self-discipline to complete the task and move on.  You’ll save time and energy.

Stick to a Routine

It’s easier to be productive when you stick to a consistent schedule instead of doing things differently each day.  This may sound boring, but over time you’ll find you actually like the regularity of a routine and you’ll get more done in less time.

 

 

Ask the Flexpert…Name some Techniques that Lower Employee Workplace Stress

7 Simple Tips to Lower Employee Stress

In these uncertain times, even effective organizations undergo stress and worry. Human Resource personnel play a critical role in monitoring employee stress levels and modeling effective behCharaciture of Flexpertaviors for the workforce. to maintain a culture that triggers less unease and tension for employees, improves resilience, boosts performance, and builds feelings of value for all members of work teams.

Signs of Employee Stress

Quarrelling workers, hassling managers, poor communicating peers who don’t reply, supervisors who are emailing while you’re talking to them… all these personnel are too harried to observe the basic tenets of respect and concern for their co-workers or subordinates.

You should be aware of these 7 techniques because they merit your attention for improving the tone in your workplace:

  1. Institute “zero-tolerance” guidelines against toxic or offensive talk.
  2. Foster behavior by managers who hear negativity to prompt employees that their good performance or interactions compensates for any small mistakes. Advise employees that it is acceptable and even desirable to attempt some outcome even if tit results in some honest errors.
  3. Inform your workers what they are doing well. A few times per week a distribute a positive quotation that motivates them or at least gets them thinking about positive actions. Blend in snippets of positive company or industry news or positive results by an employee. The idea is if people see something positive the first thing each day that sets a positive tone for the entire day.
  4. Encourage leaders to praise employees in front of their peers.
  5. Support bosses in recognizing each employees’ strengths, and then have them delegate projects that mirror each employee’s strengths. Build work groups whose members’ skills complement one another.
  6. Arrange for lunchtime speakers to educate employees about stress-management. Upload stress-reducing exercises to your internal website.
  7. Regularly recap for employees the value of their output to customers or other co-workers or to support the company’s goals.
Reduce Stress with a Staffing Agency’s Support

Flexicrew can help improve your work environment, reduce your anxiety and stress by assisting you with workforce planning and recruiting the quality talent that you need in this uncertain time.  Contact one of our workforce professionals Today!

Finding Hope during the Pandemic

There is a lot of uncertainty these days, whether in our work environment, financial affairs or in our changing and unsteady political climate. The strategies that most of us rely on to contend with such uncertainty tend to be self-defeating. When we face an uncertain future we often resort to feeling anxious, worrying, complaining, or being negative about events that may never occur.

But some employees rise to meet these uncertain times with hope and resilience. We need to develop such attitudes if we want to be successful in the face of COVID’s ups and downs.

What does having hope mean? Think of how you handle difficult situations. Do you offer platitudes like, “I hope everything will work out”? Unfortunately, this is just a way of disengaging or checking out of a difficult situation. True hope comes from a source much deeper – your core. At your core, there are vital qualities that help to determine how much hope you yourself feel, as well as what you can offer to co-workers. Hope is an essential component in facing any type of uncertainty: from layoffs, to sickness, to working from home, and to the current state of the world.

Hope’s Primary Qualities
  • Strength – You draw from inner strength to tap into your personal powers.
  • Resilience – You bounce back when faced with setbacks and obstacles.
  • Optimism – You stay positive despite the challenges ahead of you.

The above qualities are the antithesis of pessimism, complaining, and worry. Rather than be self-defeatist, you can be strong, resilient, and optimistic, and in this way improve your self-esteem.

Hope is essential for handling a crisis but it can also serve as your core value on a daily basis. Uncertainty can arrive at any time, whether it appears in a personal issue, a business issue, a national event, or a global event. The situation doesn’t even necessarily need to be negative. It could be the uncertainty and excitement of getting a promotion.

Now, let’s take a closer look at the qualities that were mentioned above.

Strength

Most of us are all too willing to give away our power. Yet, what could be a more hopeless situation than being without power? This can happen in both business and personal relationships. You can find yourself going along with something you disagree with simply because you don’t have the strength or power to speak up.

Retaining power means that you can stand up for yourself, that you can overcome resistance, that you can turn a catastrophe into an opportunity. True strength is in the core of your being. It’s a quiet calm that isn’t disturbed by events or the turmoil of emotions.

Inner strength established self-power that will anchor, uplift, and encourage you.

Resilience

Here’s an outside-of-work example:  We often see the elderly celebrated in the media for reaching 100. They are always happy to share the secret to their long life. They all have different secrets, from a cigarette and a glass of whiskey every day, to 3 glasses of red wine a week.

The truth is that they didn’t win the gene pool lottery, nor were they immune to the woes of life. They were resilient. They faced hard times and bounced back, shook defeat off at every turn. Being resilient is the true secret to avoiding victimhood.

It isn’t about positive thinking. When we’re faced with sadness, it’s healthy to deal with sadness; when we lose a loved one, grief is natural.

Resilience and overcoming adversity comes from a strong sense of self.

Optimism

Society has taught us that life is difficult, that some struggle is the norm. Society wants us to believe that the safest place for us is behind a wall. In this environment, optimism seems foolish and unrealistic. Yet, when we meet people who are truly optimistic, we are jealous of their cheerfulness. Attitudes of pessimism, skepticism, and cynicism come from fear and distrust. Life can take care of itself, that’s the attitude of optimism.

Finding hope in uncertain times is easier than you think, it’s within you.

Impact on Employees in Times of Crisis and Distress

Work and Life Stress

Throughout history, crises and distress have been a part of people’s lives. Daily life can include many mild to moderate stressors like work tension, managing time and money, and stress from inter-personal relationships either at work or in personal life.

A person may also currently be experiencing significant stresses in life through the loss of a job, civil rights unrest or political uncertainty, or the death of a loved one. During times of crisis, such as our current pandemic or community violence, the coping mechanisms people use can be strained even further.

According to the United Nations (UN), depression and anxiety caused by stress cost the global economy one trillion dollars annually before the crisis events of 2020. The additional crisis events of a worldwide pandemic and community violence over the past year may cause psychological distress in nearly everyone affected by these emergencies.

The UN states that people who coped well with life stressors before these crises are now facing additional, multiple stressors and may be unable to manage their responses fully.

People prefer certainty. Much of the anxiety workers and their families feel today is related to wanting control of their lives but not having that control. Peoples’ income, health, and work are being affected in negative ways. Situations involving social isolation, restricted movement, and the lack of a plan and outcome for crisis affects peoples’ mental health and their behavior.

FDR Quote on Fear

Anxiety Consequences

Anxiety can cause a person to:

  • Feel on edge
  • Be angry
  • Feel helpless
  • Experience sadness
  • Become frustrated
  • Try to avoid the crisis

For employees who already had minor underlying anxiety issues, a crisis can cause increased depression and less motivation to participate in activities of daily work life. In times of crisis and distress, protecting your mental health becomes extremely important, but can be stressful under the circumstances.

The Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress highlights these current factors causing additional stress during an urgent situation like COVID-19 and it ramifications:

  • Frustration and boredom related to social isolation from working at home or lockdowns
  • Fears about getting sick or infecting others
  • Inadequate access to medical care
  • Insufficient reliable information
  • Financial loss
  • Stigmatization and rejection from society
  • Inadequate food supplies
  • Adjustments needed return to a regular routine

The World Health Organization (WHO) divides these factors into social and mental health problems, all of which can affect peoples’ ability to cope with crisis.

Social Problems
  • Pre-existing: low income and discrimination of marginalized groups
  • Emergency-induced: family separation, lack of safety, loss of livelihoods, disrupted social networks, and low trust and resources; and
  • Humanitarian response-induced: overcrowding, lack of privacy, and undermining of community or traditional support.
Mental Health Problems
  • Pre-existing: mental disorders such as depression or schizophrenia
  • Emergency-induced: grief, acute stress reactions, harmful use of alcohol and drugs, and depression and anxiety, including post-traumatic stress disorder; and
  • Humanitarian response-induced: anxiety due to a lack of information about food distribution or about how to obtain basic services.

Yet despite these crises and distress stressors, multiple organizations have identified ways to help find relief.  Flexicrew will address some of these ways we have uncovered in subsequent articles.

Managing Work Obstacles: The Resilience Mindset

In order to move from a place of simply getting by in the office to a place of thriving, resilience is a necessary trait. At a basic level resilience is our ability to work through tough assignments and bounce back from situations like missed deadlines on tasks and difficulties encountered like Coronavirus and the toll it’s taking on business and personal lives.

At a more complex level, the resilience mindset embraces the idea that true resilience is the ability to navigate work, adapt to change, learn through adversity, and understand feelings and emotional responses to difficult situations. In order for this to be achieved, there must be a high level of personal awareness and insight which leads to a deep understanding of self (O’Keeffe, 2019).

Resilience mindset

Resilience is an asset sought-after employees must embrace when it comes to managing adversity because it helps them to overcome it. Rather than crumbling under the pressure and weight of every challenge encountered, they become able to assess the challenge, learn and grow from it as they go through it, and then move forward with the lessons they’ve been taught (O’Keeffe, 2019). It is resilience that empowers workers to continue moving forward, learning, and growing, and building on the things they are learning from setbacks or failure to deliver expected results at work.

Keys to Developing a Resilient Mindset

In order to develop a resilient mindset, there are several qualities and practices that can be implemented. The following outlines several of those qualities and practices and their relation to the development of resilience.

Optimism

A strong trait of those with a resilient mindset is an intentional optimistic outlook when approaching challenging situations. The way a worker views a situation shapes the approach they take when dealing with the situation.

A more positive outlook tends to yield a more positive outcome because your staff sees opportunities as opposed to obstacles, and thus enthusiastically address issues versus hesitantly avoiding them (Mind Tools, 2020). Leading psychologist Martin Seligman explains that optimism is linked to resilience in that it helps employees’ views on permanence, pervasiveness, and the personalization of hardships.

Optimism leads your staff to see bad events as temporary rather than permanent, to prevent setbacks from impacting unrelated areas of their jobs, and to not blame themselves when bad events occur. Thus, workers can better pivot and recover from challenges they experience (Mind Tools, 2020).

Focus on What You Can Control

Learning to focus on what is within their control and releasing those things that are not is an important part of developing resilience. It is only those things within their control that gives staff the ability to influence, thus exerting physical or mental and emotional energy on things outside of their control is mismanagement of time and energy (Miller, 2020). Employees who spend their time and energy on what they can control become more resilient because they put their efforts towards those things that will have the greatest impact and produce the most results. This allows them to actually be effective and respond better to situations that arise (Mind Tools, 2020).

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is critical to the development of a resilient mindset. Self-awareness helps staff to assess areas of themselves and their lives where it’s necessary to improve and areas that is producing favorable results.

Self-awareness offers staff key insights about themselves that can be used to change, adapt, grow, or alter themselves, their workplace environment, or other elements. This ultimately contributes to resilience by helping keep patterns and habits that help adapt and respond to challenges while becoming aware of and purging patterns and habits that work against their goals and targets.

If your staff can cultivate a resilient mindset their ability to cope with job-related challenges will be strengthened. Rather than being overcome by negative situations and circumstances they will become empowered to overcome those situations and circumstances. By implementing the practices mentioned and others like it, they’ll be one step closer to better navigating the difficulties they encounter.

References:

Miller, K. (2020). 5+ ways to develop a growth mindset using grit and resilience. PositivePsychology.com. https://positivepsychology.com/5-ways-develop-grit-resilience/

Mind Tools. (2020). Developing resilience: Overcoming and growing from setbacks. https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm

O’Keeffe, S. (2019, March 11). 4 aspects of a resilient mindset. https://thriveglobal.com/stories/4-aspects-of-a-resilient-mindset/

The Connection Between Self-Control and Resilience

Self-control is crucial to coping with work’s challenges and being a resilient employee. No matter what the circumstances are, a employees can control only their own actions and reactions to a situation.  How they act and react to obstacles builds their resilience, and those actions and reactions are based on the level of self-control they have.

resilience

Resilient Self-Control Actions

Psychologists have identified the positive coping skills a person needs to be resilient. When life is difficult, resilient people take action to improve their situation.  They know they need to control their:

Making plans is a positive coping skill that allows your staff to take control of their success.  Self-control builds when the staff commit to your plans.  Employees who work toward their goals cope with obstacles by growing, adapting, and staying focused on their goals.  The self-control needed to carry out a plan builds resilience against difficulties and distractions.

Resilient workers also have goals.  Instead of allowing challenges to overwhelm them and struggling with negative outcomes, resilient workers have goals that they perform hard tasks to achieve.  They recover from setbacks because they are focused on and committed to their goals.  A work team without goals often find themselves without a clear direction, because they don’t have the self-control to work toward their success.

Physical health is essential to resilience because it provides a positive way to cope with stress.  Exercise, a healthy diet, and getting enough sleep all contribute to good health.  A healthy lifestyle requires self-control.  Every worker needs to have the self-control to stick to an exercise plan, commit to healthy eating, and find time for adequate rest.

Because a resilient employee has self-control, they understand that reaching their goals can take time.  It can be hard to wait for the fulfillment that arises from of achieving goals, but self-control allows employees to stay focused and follow their plan despite distractions or the immediate satisfaction from doing something else.  Being patient makes your employees more resilient when they face obstacles because they know it may take time to overcome them.

Resilient Self-Control Reactions

When faced with a challenge or a situation your workforce doesn’t like, being resilient also involves how they react to those stresses. Life coaches teach that a worker’s reactions are under his or her own control.  Learning how to respond positively includes:

  • Self-esteem
  • Avoiding Overreaction
  • Facing Problems
  • Humor

Self-esteem is essential to resilience.  Workers who believe that their supervisor or their employer is giving them a raw deal, and that others are always trying to hurt them do not have the resilience to cope well with life’s challenges.  Self-esteem requires self-control by not reacting poorly to less than ideal situations.  Instead, resilient employees use their goals and plan to work through difficulties and don’t let their self-esteem suffer from other’s opinions.

When a resilient person fails, they understand they have control over making changes and trying again to reach their goal. They don’t blame their failure on outside forces and think they can’t make the changes needed to achieve.

Self-control plays a role in avoiding overreaction too.  When a worker overacts, they often lose their focus on their goals because of their immediate emotional reaction.  While everyone gets upset, angry, and sad from time to time, overacting is a sign that a worker doesn’t have self-control or resilience.

Resilient workers face their problems with a plan, a goal, and a commitment to overcome them.  Those who aren’t resilient avoid dealing with their problems and often use unhealthy coping mechanisms like alcohol and other drugs to lessen their disappointment and pain.  Workers need self-control to choose a positive way to cope with challenges and be resilient when faced with difficulties.

Humor is an important skill that helps your employees be resilient.  Being able to accept difficulties and setbacks by finding the humor in situations lessens stress.  Self-control allows your employees to let go of negative feelings and laugh when things don’t go as planned.  Resilience includes moving past the difficulty and finding a new way to reach goals.

Resilience is based on the control of your actions and reactions to challenges. Successfully overcoming a challenge increases self-control, helps employees learn and grow, and builds resilience.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

Yes, You Can Build your Resiliency and Grow from it

Resilient workers recover quickly from setbacks and don’t allow difficulties to hinder their success. How does a person become resilient?  Can you build your resiliency?  Can you use resiliency to grow and succeed?  Psychologists have determined that resiliency is a skill you can learn.  And once you learn what you need to be resilient, you can also improve and grow your expertise.

strength

Resiliency requires a commitment to improving yourself.  Specific actions and skills are needed to become and stay resilient.

Researchers have identified the following ways you can build and grow resiliency:
  • Take Responsibility
  • See Change as an Opportunity
  • Have Goals
  • Learn from Success and Failure
  • Get Support
  • Take Action
  • Be Optimistic
  • Have Patience
Take Responsibility

Resilient people understand that they can control their actions and reaction, but not the actions and reactions of others. To be resilient, you need to take responsibility for how you manage and conduct yourself.  Blaming others for your mistakes makes you weak.  Taking responsibility for yourself makes you strong and focuses your control on yourself.

See Change as an Opportunity

Is change good or bad? To build resiliency, you need to answer that question by knowing that change is an opportunity for both good and bad.  When your workforce sees change as being forced on them by Management, they lose their control of the situation.  Resilience requires a different approach.  Resilient workers see change as an opportunity to learn and grow.

Have Goals

You can’t learn to recover from setbacks if you don’t have goals. Otherwise, you may spend your time reacting to things that don’t improve your experiences or help you reach your goals.  Having goals helps a team focus, avoid distractions, and stay committed, making them more resilient.

Learn from Success and Failure

Resiliency is a skill that comes partly from the knowledge gained with each success and failure. When team members accept responsibility for their own actions, their successes and failures depend on each of them.  Each time workers complete a successful project, they learn ways to improve themselves for their next project.  This helps them grow and achieve more.  When you fail, instead of belittling yourself, use your failure as an opportunity to discard what doesn’t work and learn new ways to overcome obstacles.

Get Support

Even before the pandemic, work had many challenges. Getting support from others helps a single worker overcome challenges and be resilient when faced with difficulty.  Seeking others out for knowledge, through education and mentoring, helps build resilience.  Knowing there are trusted co-workers and family can help motivate and keep an individual worker focused on his team’s goals.

Take Action

Resilient people don’t’ give up. They find ways to achieve their goals despite setbacks and difficulties.  Resiliency requires action to create the opportunity to learn and grow.  Allowing your circumstances to dictate responses isn’t action.  Action involves trying new things and making the changes necessary to succeed.

Be Optimistic

Realistic optimism is necessary for resiliency. Overly optimistic people don’t adjust their plan when they need to make changes to reach a goal.  Pessimistic people rarely stay committed to their goals because they don’t believe they can achieve them.  But, people with realistic optimism understand they must be resilient when obstacles arise.

Have Patience

Building resiliency involves allowing yourself the time needed to reach goals. Long-term goals, like launching a new product or creating a software platform, or even finishing one’s education, take time to achieve.  Patience allows team members to stay focused on their goals even when they make mistakes or need more time to meet them.  The resiliency built with patience can help a team achieve targets on-time and within budget, reach professional goals and strengthen team relationships.

Yes, you can build resiliency.  By focusing on the skills, you need to develop to become resilient you can grow as a trusted work team member and improve your satisfaction with your performance.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

 

The Connection between Great Problem Solving Skills and Resilience

Resilience speaks to our ability to recover quickly from hardships that we experience. Having strong problem-solving skills speaks to our ability to look at problems comprehensively, break them down into pieces, and find applicable solutions for them in a timely matter.

Problem-Solving Involves the following Five Steps (Lawrence, 2019):
  1. Identifying the problem
  2. Breaking the problem into more manageable parts
  3. Generating possible solutions
  4. Evaluating possible solutions for viability and selecting the most appropriate option to apply to the problem
  5. Monitoring the results of the applied solution and generating and applying a new solution if necessaryConnected
Applying to the Workforce

The link between the two is that a person with strong problem-solving skills becomes a person who is more resilient. This is because the better we are at evaluating and solving the problems that arise in our lives, the quicker we can recover from the issues we face. The ability to problem-solve helps us to quickly transition out of our circumstances and onto growth (Lawrence, 2019).

How to Develop Strong Problem-Solving Skills

In order to become more resilient, we must learn to strengthen our problem-solving skills so we can better deal with obstacles we may face. The following are ways to develop problem-solving skills in our lives.

  • Ask Questions

Asking questions is one of the best ways to develop strong problem-solving skills because asking questions gets you to begin thinking critically. It is via critical thinking and asking analytical questions that one can truly get to the bottom of problems and begin developing solutions (B, 2020). Asking questions also ensures that the problem is accurately defined so that the correct issue can be addressed.

  • Gather Information

It can be easy to assume we already have what we need or know all we need to solve problems and challenges that arise in our lives. However, that often fails to be true and leaves us ill-prepared and ill-informed. This means taking the time to consult additional persons and sources for information so that a strong foundation is laid for the problem to be accurately defined and then solved (Talwar, 2019).

  • Flexibility & Adaptability

The ability to be flexible is an important skill to possess when it comes to problem-solving because many problems often require pivoting when it comes to the application stage. This means that as possible solutions are being weighed an even applied one may realize that selected options are not viable and need to go with other options to more effectively solve those problems (Talwar, 2019).

  • Approach with Positivity

Often, we approach problems with apprehension and negativity.  That hinders our ability to clearly and open-mindedly address an issue. When we have a positive outlook we can approach issues with optimism.  That makes us more likely to actually find a viable solution. Believing that a challenge is an opportunity for growth and that a positive outcome can be achieved sets the tone for the ultimate outcome (B, 2020).

So, when we are better equipped to solve problems, we become people who are also more resilient. Having the skills we need to analyze issues, generate possible options, and apply solutions also helps us build the same skills that help us become more tolerant of difficulties and recover from the difficulties we face with speed.

Thus, active pursuit of activities and opportunities that will allow us to practice asking more questions, gathering information, being flexible, and approaching problems with positivity will help build better problem-solving skills and therefore enhance our resilience.

References:

B, Z. (2020, May 12). 6 ways to enhance your problem-solving skills effectively. https://www.liehack.org/articles/productivity/6-ways-to-enhance-your-problem-solving-skills.html

Lawrence, J. (2019, December 23). Resilience skills: 5 steps to effective problem-solving. Retrieved from https://in-equilibrium.co.uk/5-steps-to-effective-problem-solving/

Talwar, M. (2019, February 19). 5 ways to improve your problem-solving skills. Retrieved from https://social.hays.com/2017/08/16/5-ways-improve-problem-solving-skills/