Finding Hope during the Pandemic

There is a lot of uncertainty these days, whether in our work environment, financial affairs or in our changing and unsteady political climate. The strategies that most of us rely on to contend with such uncertainty tend to be self-defeating. When we face an uncertain future we often resort to feeling anxious, worrying, complaining, or being negative about events that may never occur.

But some employees rise to meet these uncertain times with hope and resilience. We need to develop such attitudes if we want to be successful in the face of COVID’s ups and downs.

What does having hope mean? Think of how you handle difficult situations. Do you offer platitudes like, “I hope everything will work out”? Unfortunately, this is just a way of disengaging or checking out of a difficult situation. True hope comes from a source much deeper – your core. At your core, there are vital qualities that help to determine how much hope you yourself feel, as well as what you can offer to co-workers. Hope is an essential component in facing any type of uncertainty: from layoffs, to sickness, to working from home, and to the current state of the world.

Hope’s Primary Qualities
  • Strength – You draw from inner strength to tap into your personal powers.
  • Resilience – You bounce back when faced with setbacks and obstacles.
  • Optimism – You stay positive despite the challenges ahead of you.

The above qualities are the antithesis of pessimism, complaining, and worry. Rather than be self-defeatist, you can be strong, resilient, and optimistic, and in this way improve your self-esteem.

Hope is essential for handling a crisis but it can also serve as your core value on a daily basis. Uncertainty can arrive at any time, whether it appears in a personal issue, a business issue, a national event, or a global event. The situation doesn’t even necessarily need to be negative. It could be the uncertainty and excitement of getting a promotion.

Now, let’s take a closer look at the qualities that were mentioned above.

Strength

Most of us are all too willing to give away our power. Yet, what could be a more hopeless situation than being without power? This can happen in both business and personal relationships. You can find yourself going along with something you disagree with simply because you don’t have the strength or power to speak up.

Retaining power means that you can stand up for yourself, that you can overcome resistance, that you can turn a catastrophe into an opportunity. True strength is in the core of your being. It’s a quiet calm that isn’t disturbed by events or the turmoil of emotions.

Inner strength established self-power that will anchor, uplift, and encourage you.

Resilience

Here’s an outside-of-work example:  We often see the elderly celebrated in the media for reaching 100. They are always happy to share the secret to their long life. They all have different secrets, from a cigarette and a glass of whiskey every day, to 3 glasses of red wine a week.

The truth is that they didn’t win the gene pool lottery, nor were they immune to the woes of life. They were resilient. They faced hard times and bounced back, shook defeat off at every turn. Being resilient is the true secret to avoiding victimhood.

It isn’t about positive thinking. When we’re faced with sadness, it’s healthy to deal with sadness; when we lose a loved one, grief is natural.

Resilience and overcoming adversity comes from a strong sense of self.

Optimism

Society has taught us that life is difficult, that some struggle is the norm. Society wants us to believe that the safest place for us is behind a wall. In this environment, optimism seems foolish and unrealistic. Yet, when we meet people who are truly optimistic, we are jealous of their cheerfulness. Attitudes of pessimism, skepticism, and cynicism come from fear and distrust. Life can take care of itself, that’s the attitude of optimism.

Finding hope in uncertain times is easier than you think, it’s within you.

Impact on Employees in Times of Crisis and Distress

Work and Life Stress

Throughout history, crises and distress have been a part of people’s lives. Daily life can include many mild to moderate stressors like work tension, managing time and money, and stress from inter-personal relationships either at work or in personal life.

A person may also currently be experiencing significant stresses in life through the loss of a job, civil rights unrest or political uncertainty, or the death of a loved one. During times of crisis, such as our current pandemic or community violence, the coping mechanisms people use can be strained even further.

According to the United Nations (UN), depression and anxiety caused by stress cost the global economy one trillion dollars annually before the crisis events of 2020. The additional crisis events of a worldwide pandemic and community violence over the past year may cause psychological distress in nearly everyone affected by these emergencies.

The UN states that people who coped well with life stressors before these crises are now facing additional, multiple stressors and may be unable to manage their responses fully.

People prefer certainty. Much of the anxiety workers and their families feel today is related to wanting control of their lives but not having that control. Peoples’ income, health, and work are being affected in negative ways. Situations involving social isolation, restricted movement, and the lack of a plan and outcome for crisis affects peoples’ mental health and their behavior.

FDR Quote on Fear

Anxiety Consequences

Anxiety can cause a person to:

  • Feel on edge
  • Be angry
  • Feel helpless
  • Experience sadness
  • Become frustrated
  • Try to avoid the crisis

For employees who already had minor underlying anxiety issues, a crisis can cause increased depression and less motivation to participate in activities of daily work life. In times of crisis and distress, protecting your mental health becomes extremely important, but can be stressful under the circumstances.

The Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress highlights these current factors causing additional stress during an urgent situation like COVID-19 and it ramifications:

  • Frustration and boredom related to social isolation from working at home or lockdowns
  • Fears about getting sick or infecting others
  • Inadequate access to medical care
  • Insufficient reliable information
  • Financial loss
  • Stigmatization and rejection from society
  • Inadequate food supplies
  • Adjustments needed return to a regular routine

The World Health Organization (WHO) divides these factors into social and mental health problems, all of which can affect peoples’ ability to cope with crisis.

Social Problems
  • Pre-existing: low income and discrimination of marginalized groups
  • Emergency-induced: family separation, lack of safety, loss of livelihoods, disrupted social networks, and low trust and resources; and
  • Humanitarian response-induced: overcrowding, lack of privacy, and undermining of community or traditional support.
Mental Health Problems
  • Pre-existing: mental disorders such as depression or schizophrenia
  • Emergency-induced: grief, acute stress reactions, harmful use of alcohol and drugs, and depression and anxiety, including post-traumatic stress disorder; and
  • Humanitarian response-induced: anxiety due to a lack of information about food distribution or about how to obtain basic services.

Yet despite these crises and distress stressors, multiple organizations have identified ways to help find relief.  Flexicrew will address some of these ways we have uncovered in subsequent articles.

Managing Work Obstacles: The Resilience Mindset

In order to move from a place of simply getting by in the office to a place of thriving, resilience is a necessary trait. At a basic level resilience is our ability to work through tough assignments and bounce back from situations like missed deadlines on tasks and difficulties encountered like Coronavirus and the toll it’s taking on business and personal lives.

At a more complex level, the resilience mindset embraces the idea that true resilience is the ability to navigate work, adapt to change, learn through adversity, and understand feelings and emotional responses to difficult situations. In order for this to be achieved, there must be a high level of personal awareness and insight which leads to a deep understanding of self (O’Keeffe, 2019).

Resilience mindset

Resilience is an asset sought-after employees must embrace when it comes to managing adversity because it helps them to overcome it. Rather than crumbling under the pressure and weight of every challenge encountered, they become able to assess the challenge, learn and grow from it as they go through it, and then move forward with the lessons they’ve been taught (O’Keeffe, 2019). It is resilience that empowers workers to continue moving forward, learning, and growing, and building on the things they are learning from setbacks or failure to deliver expected results at work.

Keys to Developing a Resilient Mindset

In order to develop a resilient mindset, there are several qualities and practices that can be implemented. The following outlines several of those qualities and practices and their relation to the development of resilience.

Optimism

A strong trait of those with a resilient mindset is an intentional optimistic outlook when approaching challenging situations. The way a worker views a situation shapes the approach they take when dealing with the situation.

A more positive outlook tends to yield a more positive outcome because your staff sees opportunities as opposed to obstacles, and thus enthusiastically address issues versus hesitantly avoiding them (Mind Tools, 2020). Leading psychologist Martin Seligman explains that optimism is linked to resilience in that it helps employees’ views on permanence, pervasiveness, and the personalization of hardships.

Optimism leads your staff to see bad events as temporary rather than permanent, to prevent setbacks from impacting unrelated areas of their jobs, and to not blame themselves when bad events occur. Thus, workers can better pivot and recover from challenges they experience (Mind Tools, 2020).

Focus on What You Can Control

Learning to focus on what is within their control and releasing those things that are not is an important part of developing resilience. It is only those things within their control that gives staff the ability to influence, thus exerting physical or mental and emotional energy on things outside of their control is mismanagement of time and energy (Miller, 2020). Employees who spend their time and energy on what they can control become more resilient because they put their efforts towards those things that will have the greatest impact and produce the most results. This allows them to actually be effective and respond better to situations that arise (Mind Tools, 2020).

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is critical to the development of a resilient mindset. Self-awareness helps staff to assess areas of themselves and their lives where it’s necessary to improve and areas that is producing favorable results.

Self-awareness offers staff key insights about themselves that can be used to change, adapt, grow, or alter themselves, their workplace environment, or other elements. This ultimately contributes to resilience by helping keep patterns and habits that help adapt and respond to challenges while becoming aware of and purging patterns and habits that work against their goals and targets.

If your staff can cultivate a resilient mindset their ability to cope with job-related challenges will be strengthened. Rather than being overcome by negative situations and circumstances they will become empowered to overcome those situations and circumstances. By implementing the practices mentioned and others like it, they’ll be one step closer to better navigating the difficulties they encounter.

References:

Miller, K. (2020). 5+ ways to develop a growth mindset using grit and resilience. PositivePsychology.com. https://positivepsychology.com/5-ways-develop-grit-resilience/

Mind Tools. (2020). Developing resilience: Overcoming and growing from setbacks. https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/resilience.htm

O’Keeffe, S. (2019, March 11). 4 aspects of a resilient mindset. https://thriveglobal.com/stories/4-aspects-of-a-resilient-mindset/

The Connection Between Self-Control and Resilience

Self-control is crucial to coping with work’s challenges and being a resilient employee. No matter what the circumstances are, a employees can control only their own actions and reactions to a situation.  How they act and react to obstacles builds their resilience, and those actions and reactions are based on the level of self-control they have.

resilience

Resilient Self-Control Actions

Psychologists have identified the positive coping skills a person needs to be resilient. When life is difficult, resilient people take action to improve their situation.  They know they need to control their:

Making plans is a positive coping skill that allows your staff to take control of their success.  Self-control builds when the staff commit to your plans.  Employees who work toward their goals cope with obstacles by growing, adapting, and staying focused on their goals.  The self-control needed to carry out a plan builds resilience against difficulties and distractions.

Resilient workers also have goals.  Instead of allowing challenges to overwhelm them and struggling with negative outcomes, resilient workers have goals that they perform hard tasks to achieve.  They recover from setbacks because they are focused on and committed to their goals.  A work team without goals often find themselves without a clear direction, because they don’t have the self-control to work toward their success.

Physical health is essential to resilience because it provides a positive way to cope with stress.  Exercise, a healthy diet, and getting enough sleep all contribute to good health.  A healthy lifestyle requires self-control.  Every worker needs to have the self-control to stick to an exercise plan, commit to healthy eating, and find time for adequate rest.

Because a resilient employee has self-control, they understand that reaching their goals can take time.  It can be hard to wait for the fulfillment that arises from of achieving goals, but self-control allows employees to stay focused and follow their plan despite distractions or the immediate satisfaction from doing something else.  Being patient makes your employees more resilient when they face obstacles because they know it may take time to overcome them.

Resilient Self-Control Reactions

When faced with a challenge or a situation your workforce doesn’t like, being resilient also involves how they react to those stresses. Life coaches teach that a worker’s reactions are under his or her own control.  Learning how to respond positively includes:

  • Self-esteem
  • Avoiding Overreaction
  • Facing Problems
  • Humor

Self-esteem is essential to resilience.  Workers who believe that their supervisor or their employer is giving them a raw deal, and that others are always trying to hurt them do not have the resilience to cope well with life’s challenges.  Self-esteem requires self-control by not reacting poorly to less than ideal situations.  Instead, resilient employees use their goals and plan to work through difficulties and don’t let their self-esteem suffer from other’s opinions.

When a resilient person fails, they understand they have control over making changes and trying again to reach their goal. They don’t blame their failure on outside forces and think they can’t make the changes needed to achieve.

Self-control plays a role in avoiding overreaction too.  When a worker overacts, they often lose their focus on their goals because of their immediate emotional reaction.  While everyone gets upset, angry, and sad from time to time, overacting is a sign that a worker doesn’t have self-control or resilience.

Resilient workers face their problems with a plan, a goal, and a commitment to overcome them.  Those who aren’t resilient avoid dealing with their problems and often use unhealthy coping mechanisms like alcohol and other drugs to lessen their disappointment and pain.  Workers need self-control to choose a positive way to cope with challenges and be resilient when faced with difficulties.

Humor is an important skill that helps your employees be resilient.  Being able to accept difficulties and setbacks by finding the humor in situations lessens stress.  Self-control allows your employees to let go of negative feelings and laugh when things don’t go as planned.  Resilience includes moving past the difficulty and finding a new way to reach goals.

Resilience is based on the control of your actions and reactions to challenges. Successfully overcoming a challenge increases self-control, helps employees learn and grow, and builds resilience.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

Yes, You Can Build your Resiliency and Grow from it

Resilient workers recover quickly from setbacks and don’t allow difficulties to hinder their success. How does a person become resilient?  Can you build your resiliency?  Can you use resiliency to grow and succeed?  Psychologists have determined that resiliency is a skill you can learn.  And once you learn what you need to be resilient, you can also improve and grow your expertise.

strength

Resiliency requires a commitment to improving yourself.  Specific actions and skills are needed to become and stay resilient.

Researchers have identified the following ways you can build and grow resiliency:
  • Take Responsibility
  • See Change as an Opportunity
  • Have Goals
  • Learn from Success and Failure
  • Get Support
  • Take Action
  • Be Optimistic
  • Have Patience
Take Responsibility

Resilient people understand that they can control their actions and reaction, but not the actions and reactions of others. To be resilient, you need to take responsibility for how you manage and conduct yourself.  Blaming others for your mistakes makes you weak.  Taking responsibility for yourself makes you strong and focuses your control on yourself.

See Change as an Opportunity

Is change good or bad? To build resiliency, you need to answer that question by knowing that change is an opportunity for both good and bad.  When your workforce sees change as being forced on them by Management, they lose their control of the situation.  Resilience requires a different approach.  Resilient workers see change as an opportunity to learn and grow.

Have Goals

You can’t learn to recover from setbacks if you don’t have goals. Otherwise, you may spend your time reacting to things that don’t improve your experiences or help you reach your goals.  Having goals helps a team focus, avoid distractions, and stay committed, making them more resilient.

Learn from Success and Failure

Resiliency is a skill that comes partly from the knowledge gained with each success and failure. When team members accept responsibility for their own actions, their successes and failures depend on each of them.  Each time workers complete a successful project, they learn ways to improve themselves for their next project.  This helps them grow and achieve more.  When you fail, instead of belittling yourself, use your failure as an opportunity to discard what doesn’t work and learn new ways to overcome obstacles.

Get Support

Even before the pandemic, work had many challenges. Getting support from others helps a single worker overcome challenges and be resilient when faced with difficulty.  Seeking others out for knowledge, through education and mentoring, helps build resilience.  Knowing there are trusted co-workers and family can help motivate and keep an individual worker focused on his team’s goals.

Take Action

Resilient people don’t’ give up. They find ways to achieve their goals despite setbacks and difficulties.  Resiliency requires action to create the opportunity to learn and grow.  Allowing your circumstances to dictate responses isn’t action.  Action involves trying new things and making the changes necessary to succeed.

Be Optimistic

Realistic optimism is necessary for resiliency. Overly optimistic people don’t adjust their plan when they need to make changes to reach a goal.  Pessimistic people rarely stay committed to their goals because they don’t believe they can achieve them.  But, people with realistic optimism understand they must be resilient when obstacles arise.

Have Patience

Building resiliency involves allowing yourself the time needed to reach goals. Long-term goals, like launching a new product or creating a software platform, or even finishing one’s education, take time to achieve.  Patience allows team members to stay focused on their goals even when they make mistakes or need more time to meet them.  The resiliency built with patience can help a team achieve targets on-time and within budget, reach professional goals and strengthen team relationships.

Yes, you can build resiliency.  By focusing on the skills, you need to develop to become resilient you can grow as a trusted work team member and improve your satisfaction with your performance.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

 

The Connection between Great Problem Solving Skills and Resilience

Resilience speaks to our ability to recover quickly from hardships that we experience. Having strong problem-solving skills speaks to our ability to look at problems comprehensively, break them down into pieces, and find applicable solutions for them in a timely matter.

Problem-Solving Involves the following Five Steps (Lawrence, 2019):
  1. Identifying the problem
  2. Breaking the problem into more manageable part
  3. Generating possible solutions
  4. Evaluating possible solutions for viability and selecting the most appropriate option to apply to the problem
  5. Monitoring the results of the applied solution and generating and applying a new solution if necessaryConnected
Applying to the Workforce

The link between the two is that a person with strong problem-solving skills becomes a person who is more resilient. This is because the better we are at evaluating and solving the problems that arise in our lives, the quicker we can recover from the issues we face. The ability to problem-solve helps us to quickly transition out of our circumstances and onto growth (Lawrence, 2019).

How to Develop Strong Problem-Solving Skills

In order to become more resilient, we must learn to strengthen our problem-solving skills so we can better deal with obstacles we may face. The following are ways to develop problem-solving skills in our lives.

  • Ask Questions

Asking questions is one of the best ways to develop strong problem-solving skills because asking questions gets you to begin thinking critically. It is via critical thinking and asking analytical questions that one can truly get to the bottom of problems and begin developing solutions (B, 2020). Asking questions also ensures that the problem is accurately defined so that the correct issue can be addressed.

  • Gather Information

It can be easy to assume we already have what we need or know all we need to solve problems and challenges that arise in our lives. However, that often fails to be true and leaves us ill-prepared and ill-informed. This means taking the time to consult additional persons and sources for information so that a strong foundation is laid for the problem to be accurately defined and then solved (Talwar, 2019).

  • Flexibility & Adaptability

The ability to be flexible is an important skill to possess when it comes to problem-solving because many problems often require pivoting when it comes to the application stage. This means that as possible solutions are being weighed an even applied one may realize that selected options are not viable and need to go with other options to more effectively solve those problems (Talwar, 2019).

  • Approach with Positivity

Often, we approach problems with apprehension and negativity which hinder our ability to clearly and open-mindedly address an issue. When we have a positive outlook we can approach issues with optimism, which makes us more likely to actually find a viable solution. Believing that a challenge is an opportunity for growth and that a positive outcome can be achieved sets the tone for the ultimate outcome (B, 2020).

When we are people who are better equipped to solve problems, we become people who are also more resilient. Having the skills we need to analyze issues, generate possible options, and apply solutions also helps us build the same skills that help us become more tolerant of difficulties and recover from the difficulties we face with speed.

Thus, active pursuit of activities and opportunities that will allow us to practice asking more questions, gathering information, being flexible, and approaching problems with positivity will help build better problem-solving skills and therefore enhance our resilience.

References:

B, Z. (2020, May 12). 6 ways to enhance your problem-solving skills effectively. Retrieved from https://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/6-ways-to-enhance-your-problem-solving-skills.html

Lawrence, J. (2019, December 23). Resilience skills: 5 steps to effective problem-solving. Retrieved from https://in-equilibrium.co.uk/5-steps-to-effective-problem-solving/

Talwar, M. (2019, February 19). 5 ways to improve your problem-solving skills. Retrieved from https://social.hays.com/2017/08/16/5-ways-improve-problem-solving-skills/

5 Key Ways To Become More Resilient

Resiliency is a characteristic possessed by every individual worker who has ever achieved something truly worthwhile. Being able to push through difficulties, setbacks and the unrelenting obstacles that work throws your way is paramount to success in your job and your career. Unfortunately, the majority of workers may look for the path of least resistance. Avoiding difficulty and hard work is incredibly enticing for most.

word resilience

However, if you plan on separating yourself from the status quo and actually leading a career of accomplishment, resiliency is a must. Make no mistake; resiliency is not a trait that people are born with, far from it. Becoming resilient is a process and requires hardships and difficult situations.

In this article, we will discuss 5 ways to become more resilient in your everyday work life that will allow you to step out of your comfort zone and go after those lofty goals.

Seek Discomfort

Are you serious?

Yes…as human beings, we have an inherent tendency to avoid discomfort. Making ourselves do things that are hard and unpleasant is not our natural instinct, even if the task is beneficial in the long run. One of the most important habits you can develop when it comes to building resilience is to actually seek out discomfort here and there.

What does this mean? Think about the things you know you should be doing, but always find an excuse to avoid executing. Maybe this is getting up early to workout, staying up well into the night to finish important assignments for work, or having that difficult conversation you have been putting off with your supervisor or your subordinate. You are certainly aware of whatever discomfort your position brings you but needs to be done for your own benefit.

Simply put, becoming resilient involves voluntarily attacking discomfort head on instead of coming up with yet another excuse to postpone what needs to be done.

Solidify Your “Why”

Being resilient is synonymous with refusing to give up. That being said, having a deeply rooted conviction as to why you are doing something in the first place is critical. Doing something difficult just for the sake of discomfort is highly likely to result in failure.

Take a moment to reflect back to that uncomfortable work activity you always seem to put off. Instead of the difficulty involved in this task, think about the reasoning behind it. If you want to become resilient, finding your “why” behind overcoming an obstacle is a must.

Keep Your Ego In Check

So many of us shy away from challenges for fear of how others will perceive us. Being labeled a “try-hard” has ironically taken on a negative connotation in today’s society. What you need to understand is that this is YOUR life, not a drill or dress rehearsal before the real thing. Furthermore, you are in your current job or in the workforce for a short time and you can bet that one day, you will look back and regret not going after what you wanted because of what so-and-so thought about it.

Resiliency and ego do not coexist very neatly. Therefore, being able to drown out negative opinions from small-minded co-workers is absolutely necessary to maintain a state of resilience.

Don’t Shy Away From Failure

Make no mistake; failure is as an inevitable and vitally important part of employment. In order to become skillful, there is a large amount of failure involved. Likewise, in the pursuit of anything truly worthwhile, setbacks and obstacles are a guarantee.

Every time you fail at an assignment on your way to becoming competent, each and every occasion that you refuse to let a mistake or setback halt your progress you are building resilience. When you fail, and you will, use the situation as a lesson to fail better next time. Rest assured that beyond that last failure is hard-earned success.

Self-Talk Is Everything

The way you communicate with yourself in your mental environment has to be positive and compassionate if you want to become more resilient. So many people go through life berating themselves for every shortcoming and mistake and then wonder why other people speak to them the same way.

One thing that is certain on your path to success is that a fairly large percentage of your co-workers will question and disagree with many of the decisions you have to make and then sing your praises when you finally accomplish the goal. YOU must be a voice of support and motivation to yourself during the hard times, really at all times. Being able to maintain your resiliency relies heavily on your ability to sustain positive self-talk.

Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.

 

Mindset – Developing Resilience

There are three key steps that your workforce will experience as you facilitate their attempt to build greater resilience.

Resilience Bounce back sign

1. Understanding

At this stage, they invest energy into learning about the situation they are facing. If they are dealing with a health concern over COVID-19 diagnosis, then this is the research stage where they set out to learn as much as possible. If they are dealing with financial change or workplace challenge, they will still embark on a research project; it will just be shaped by the situation they are dealing with. The first stage is important because it sets the scene for the next two steps.

2. Managing

In this step, you and your employees begin to learn new behaviors and coping strategies. You help them discover what it looks like to take care of themselves on and off the job properly, from physical and mental health to social and financial health. You should teach them new ways to manage stress and deal with unpredictability.

3. Growth

Finally, there is the growth stage. This is when the experience starts to shift your employees’ priorities. They should now understand what is going on, they are learning how to manage it, and now they are growing into a new reality.

Often, this is when workers building resilience start to notice how grateful they are for everything in their life. Gratitude has a large role to play in resilience.

Resilient workers often share several characteristics. One of the biggest is outlook. To build resilience, they must adopt a positive mindset. Because their attitude is key.

For example, if they view failure as a learning opportunity, then they have a greater understanding and are in greater control of their emotions. This type of positive outlook is key to resilience. This positive mindset will serve as their fuel as they attempt to perform effectively on the job in the face of adversity or change from Coronavirus, the economic situation within your company and employment uncertainty, political polarization and ethnic disruption.

In addition to a positive mindset, there are other contributing factors to resilience. One of which is their support network. It’s much easier to build resilience when they have a safety net of people who like and support them.  This is where you should really focus your management efforts on your workforce with programs to build employee reward and recognition that contribute to their self-worth.

What else?
  • A positive view of themselves
  • Feeling secure in their strengths, skills, and ability to deal with difficult situations
  • Being a strong communicator
  • Being a strong problem-solver
  • Maintaining a never-say-die attitude
  • A strong decision-making ability
  • The ability to put together plans and follow-through
  • The ability to see the bigger picture.
Need Assistance Hiring Resilient Workers

If you need some assistance in recruiting and hiring more resilient workers in this uncertain labor market, contact Flexicrew Today.